Bandit Model 990xp / Model 95 overheating issues... is there a fix?

G00p

New Member
Location
Houston
Hello all,

My dad and I have been running these two Bandits the past few years... the 990 xp is a 2011 and I think the model 95 is a 2009. They have identical 85hp diesel motors, which I believe are Kubotas (navy blue). We have constant issues with the both of them overheating... The radiators will fill up with fine debris from the chips, causing the machines to reach 210 and trigger the tattletale switches to shut 'em off. We end up having to take the covers off and blow out the radiators with air blowers or compressors. It's a real pain in the butt, especially in the middle of jobs. They get to the point to where they eventually have the be taken to a do-it-yourself carwash and blasted with the power washer.

I was curious if any of you are running these machines with similar issues, and if you've found a solution. Is there some way to attach an additional auxiliary fan or something to the radiators to assist with cooling? Replace the radiators all together? Would really like to find a fix, because other than this issue, they are fine machines.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I’ve been running Bandits for years, and ran a 990 with that engine for a while. Never had an overheating problem with it like you though. Have you ever done a cooling system flush and coolant change? That may help. If the radiator is just clogging up though, is the screen on the front of the engine intact and in place? If not, that will definitely do it.

How often do you wash out your radiators? We have ours cleaned at least twice a year, to eliminate the fine dust that builds up.

Also, do you keep the knives sharp and anvils properly adjusted? That will reduce the amount of fine dust you’re making.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
I blow off my external heavy duty screen and out my radiator fins every time before I shut the engine off. That simple work around has made a big difference. (Even though I can't get to all the fin slots etc.)
 

G00p

New Member
Location
Houston
I’ve been running Bandits for years, and ran a 990 with that engine for a while. Never had an overheating problem with it like you though. Have you ever done a cooling system flush and coolant change? That may help. If the radiator is just clogging up though, is the screen on the front of the engine intact and in place? If not, that will definitely do it.

How often do you wash out your radiators? We have ours cleaned at least twice a year, to eliminate the fine dust that builds up.

Also, do you keep the knives sharp and anvils properly adjusted? That will reduce the amount of fine dust you’re making.

We ran a 1490 xp prior to that for about nine years, and that one never never saw any overheating issues...

I believe the cooling system was flushed and replenished about a year ago by a mechanic that we have do work on our equipment. I could be wrong about the flush though. He may have only replaced the fluid.

The screen of the radiator is kept on the machine except when we end up having to blow out the radiator... We take it to the car wash about once a month to give it a thorough clean out.

We diligently flip and change the knives. If it starts throwing shreds, we change them out. Anvil adjustment is something foreign to us... If you have any suggestions on where I'd get more information on this, it would be much appreciated. I've read mixed opinions on how far the anvil should be from the knives, but if you've run the same 990 xp before than you may have better insight.
 
Last edited:

G00p

New Member
Location
Houston
Are your belts tensioned right?

what is the rating of your anti-freeze mix?

Test the cap and thermostats

The belts are tensioned to spec, and checked regularly.

I'm not sure about the rating of the anti-freeze mix... Is there a specific one that we should be using for these chippers, and does that make a significant difference? When I asked my dad about it, he said that our mechanic just used whatever anti-freeze mix is used for diesel motors.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
We ran a 1490 xp prior to that for about nine years, and that one never never saw any overheating issues...

I believe the cooling system was flushed and replenished about a year ago by a mechanic that we have do work on our equipment. I could be wrong about the flush though. He may have only replaced the fluid.

The screen of the radiator is kept on the machine except when we end up having to blow out the radiator... We take it to the car wash about once a month to give it a thorough clean out.

We diligently flip and change the knives. If it starts throwing shreds, we change them out. Anvil adjustment is something foreign to us... If you have any suggestions on where I'd get more information on this, it would be much appreciated. I've read mixed opinions on how far the anvil should be from the knives, but if you've run the same 990 xp before than you may have better insight.
It sounds to me like you are keeping up with things pretty well, but definitely look into whether or not your cooling system was flushed, and if not, I would recommend doing it. Even a very thin layer of scale inside the radiator makes a tremendous difference in the cooling capacity of that radiator. Scale acts as insulation, and blocks the heat from being transferred to the cooling fins in the radiator.

Anvil adjustment instructions are in the owner’s manual for the chipper, you can also find some videos on YouTube (
) that show how it’s done. Bandit makes a tool to use to set the anvil properly, but it basically comes down to about an 1/8” gap between knife and anvil. We set ours by eye, but I’ve been doing it long enough to be comfortable doing it that way, I don’t recommend trying that as a knife contacting the anvil while the chipper is under load will result in catastrophic damage to your chipper.

As for which antifreeze and concentration to run in the engine, check the engine manual. If you don’t have one, contact the manufacturer and they will likely send you one, or at least tell you where to get it.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Location
My Island, WA
Of course check for cooling system issues like t-stat and flushing the system. BUTTT you can get aftermarket radiators with a much wider fin spacing. On a morbark that would clog the radiator up with fines, we took it to a radiator shop and they recored it. The new one has a straight pass though design with a full 1/8th by 3/8th opening between the fins (maybe a but more), they said it would loose a smidge of efficiency but should trade off with less blockages. Keep in mind this is the coastal PNW and we wear shirts and sleeveless shorts in the rain to about 55 degrees..
 

G00p

New Member
Location
Houston
Thanks for all the responses, everyone. We're going to have a flush done and see if that helps. We'll also look at replacing the thermostats since it's a rather inexpensive fix.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Recoring the radiator worked for me. More space between tubes and fins meant that I could flush out sawdust with a hose or compressed air. The radiator shop could not understand how the machine designers spe’d out radiators meant for particulate free working conditions
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
This is so good to know. I wasn't aware that there were radiators with that big of openings between the fins (approaching 3/8 of an inch.) I'm going to talk to someone at a ratiator shop and be ready to re-core that way at the first sign of trouble with my radiator.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Location
Olympia, WA
Very reasonable.

When I looked into a radiator, when I thought I might have a hole, my Boxer mini-loader was over $1000 to replace.

I think the guy at the radiator shop in Tacoma's industrial area near the port (time warp!!!) said around 5-6 to rebuild.

He tested it; no leaks, no charge!
 

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