ATC belay device for light duty rigging/control

Phil

Well-Known Member
Location
Oak Lawn, IL
The thread on the munter hitch for lowering made me think of this.

Anybody every try one of these ATC belay devices for light duty?


I have one just sitting doing nothing. Been thinking about how it would work to help control swing on a limb that has a separate primary rigging point. Its more gear than just a munter but might be able to provide more controlled lowering based on rope angle and perhaps not hockle the line.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Still likely to get hockles.

There isn't much difference between any belay device. My rigging biners were steel HMS style so there was always one around to do double duty.
 

Phil

Well-Known Member
Location
Oak Lawn, IL
If you're gonna carry an additional piece of kit (over just a spare biner you probably already have on your saddle at all times anyway) why not go with a rig-n-wrench setup?
$$$$$$$$$$

$260 for isc rig n wrench
$199 for rope logic rig n wrench
$22 atc belay (free since I have one)

I'm looking at this through the lens of an occasional climber. If I was an all day every day operation there would be value to the purpose built device. Now don't mind me as I saunter off in my treemotion evo that cost my left testicle.
 

Cereal_Killer

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
You can build a DIY wrench for $0, use an old piece of hitch cord for the tether ($0) to attach it to a pinto ($50) and have a much better option than the ATC.

If you're only an occasional climber that's all the more reason to get proper tools, I do this every day and I wouldn't want to handicap myself with an ATC, I can't imagine how handicap it would make a non-pro trying to use illsuited tools.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
If you're gonna carry an additional piece of kit (over just a spare biner you probably already have on your saddle at all times anyway) why not go with a rig-n-wrench setup?
I climbed with an atc attached to my saddle for my first three years of tree climbing. It was a safety blanket for if I got stuck and needed to bail, and it was also a way to occassionally exit a tree when I was SRT canopy tied and still without functional ability to use MRT technique. I think a lot of us of a certain age have an atc on hand from our rock climbing days.

My atc barely took my cougar blue. I had to persistently wedge it in to get it through the device. Anyone else have that problem, and on which line?
 

Phil

Well-Known Member
Location
Oak Lawn, IL
You can build a DIY wrench for $0, use an old piece of hitch cord for the tether ($0) to attach it to a pinto ($50) and have a much better option than the ATC.

If you're only an occasional climber that's all the more reason to get proper tools, I do this every day and I wouldn't want to handicap myself with an ATC, I can't imagine how handicap it would make a non-pro trying to use illsuited tools.
I get purpose built stuff. Everything I have for the work I do is purpose built. I do wonder how a device I have collecting dust might be of use though.

I like to blend old school with new school. If I'm doing light duty rigging, I'll probably be using my rigging thimble saver I spliced up and if friction is needed I'll just wrap the rope around itself once or twice. Good old 3 strand. Won't even phase it.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Cougar BLue diameter: 11.7mm
ATC rope capacity:11mm

There are lots of good reasons that specs are written for gear. But...the specs need to be read...hint hint

Would you persistently wedge your size 11.7 feet into size 11 boots?
 
Actually gotta disagree with the hockles comment - the ATC is the one thing on my alpine belt that doesn't pull a rope twister-roo - even on multiple 60 meter raps (3 and 4 at a go). The rope goes straight thru the ATC, down under the biner, then up and out. Might with 3 strand? A Munter or especially an F8 - forget it - any rope does a spiral dance after half a rope rap or less. On a modern arb kern I think you'd be OK. Gotta agree with the rope size comment though - on ice, we're on 11's or nowadays, smaller (the new spaghetti gives me the willies though - still). But on a large arb rope, dunno if the newest ATC gizmo's are sized for that big a rope because the alpine dynamic climbing lines have gotten smaller and smaller the last 10-15 yrs. We used to climb on 12 and 13 mm singles though in the old days (sigh - the days of electrical conduit for ice "pro" and non dry ropes you could hold out horizontal for 6 feet cuz they froze so solid). An ATC is rated to catch a lead whipper, not sure how many kN but should be easy to find out. But the ATC is usually used now around here for double ropes or twins - two ropes fed thru it side by side - the ATC loads evenly in this use. As I've said before, catching a climber's fall always surprises everybody that tries it for the first few times in practice sessions - how violent it is. Funny to watch some of the expressions . . . . So my vote would probably be that if you'd lower a tree bit on a biner and Munter, yeah guess I could try an ATC. But I wouldn't personally use a Munter for this stuff unless you have no affection for your rope. My 2 cents . . . .

Addenda:
Info I looked at 23-Apr-21 showed current ATC models tested for rope sizes ~ 8.3 mm to 11 mm
 
Last edited:

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
Cougar BLue diameter: 11.7mm
ATC rope capacity:11mm

There are lots of good reasons that specs are written for gear. But...the specs need to be read...hint hint

Would you persistently wedge your size 11.7 feet into size 11 boots?
False equivalency - ropes don't feel pain! ;)
 

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