10mm lanyard users

Viking

New Member
Location
Columbus Ohio
Been a big fan of 10mm lanyard cordgage. I have used beeline, but ocean has been my fav for a while. Only thing is im using it through a cinch ( and it grabs just fine!) and want to go back to a micro pulley and prussic . What cordage have you tried? Would 8mm suffice on 10mm rope? I dont have my gear on me so I cant experiment right now. Experience or suggestions will be rewarded with a Flavor Flav YEAHHHHHH BOYYYYYYYYYYYYY!
 

cambmx

Member
Location
Wisconsin
I have an 8mm VT with a 10mm rope, but it took an extra wrap to make it grab. I love how it feels and grabs, way better than 1/2 in I had before.
 

opposablethumb

Active Member
Location
Philadelphia
I use 7/16" KMIII on my lanyard, so I'm not technically in this club...

BUT, I copied Tom D.'s idea for using 5 mm New England Tech Cord, which is rated at 5K tensile strength. I'm sure it would work fine on 10mm rope.

I've got it tied in a Distel, 5 wraps, with the eye of an ISC swivel-biner as the hitch tender.

See this thread for pictures and explanations of the setup I'm talking about. I've been using it for 6 months or so, and it is a sweet, simple, cheap, and lightweight rig. Only bummer is that Tech cord's core is pure technora, I believe, and you can't visually inspect it to see how much it's self-abraiding, so I just change mine out frequently, all for a price of less than $5 a shot.
 

Babberney

Well-Known Member
Location
Austin, TX
the tech cord also can be pretty grabby and hard to move once it sets. Usually not a prob with lanyard but I have a very long lanyard that sometimes gets used as a secondary tie-in (not just thrown over a nearby limb but moved to my center 'D' and set in its own TIP to complete a section where my primary rope is too flat or otherwise not optimal, but I don't want to lose my primary TIP. It's a bit of a pain to use in this application, but I still like it overall for how light and compact it is.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I use 10mm HTP with a michoacon tied with HRC. It works very well.

[/ QUOTE ]

That makes more sense than a VT for a lanyard, A hitch that you think is too grabby (like a Distel for example) for regular climbing is perfect for a lanyard.
-AJ
 

livefreeordie

Active Member
Location
Contoocook, NH
i have used 10 mm beeline as a lanyard for quite a while now and more recently have been using 10mm OP and love both of them. i have tried endless combinations of hitches and hitch cords and adjusters to try and finely tune my lanyard setup. i have used 5mm tech cord, 8mm op, 8mm beeline, 8mm hrc, trango cinch, and what i am have found that i like the best is 10mm op with 8mm beeline in a vt with a hitchclimber as my micro pulley. i tend to use my lanyard as a second climbing system once in a while and this setup works awesome for me. using the hitch climber even makes it possible to move my lanyard off of my d ring and onto the hitchclimber in my climbing system and have two systems working off my swivel...if you follow all that
 

SingleJack

Well-Known Member
Location
W MD
[ QUOTE ]
I use 7/16" KMIII on my lanyard, so I'm not technically in this club...

BUT, I copied Tom D.'s idea for using 5 mm New England Tech Cord, which is rated at 5K tensile strength. I'm sure it would work fine on 10mm rope.

I've got it tied in a Distel, 5 wraps, with the eye of an ISC swivel-biner as the hitch tender.

See this thread for pictures and explanations of the setup I'm talking about. I've been using it for 6 months or so, and it is a sweet, simple, cheap, and lightweight rig. Only bummer is that Tech cord's core is pure technora, I believe, and you can't visually inspect it to see how much it's self-abraiding, so I just change mine out frequently, all for a price of less than $5 a shot.

[/ QUOTE ]

+1, sort of:

7/16 HTP (10mm would work); copied TomD's DEDA idea; Distel (4); 8mm BlueWater; Biner tender; 2+ yrs; sweet.

pictures and explanations
 

SingleJack

Well-Known Member
Location
W MD
[ QUOTE ]
Could some more pics be put up please!

[/ QUOTE ]
There have been several pic's and links to pic's and a link to a thread with pic's "put up".
Go back and click on the links and attachments ... enjoy ...
 

Jeff_Cochran

Well-Known Member
Location
Memphis TN
Personally, i have four lanyards; each with different species and style of climbing in mind with the engineering of each lanyard. ask yourselves questions like why haul around 20' 10mm of lanyard and a hundred dollar adjuster to top and flop a white pine; when a 10' 5/8ths three strand and a gibbs works way better and you don't have to gum up your nice prune out gear. why wear $1500 worth of gear to prune a lob lolly and funkdefy your gear? my lanyards: a 9' 5/8ths three strand, a 18' tachyon with an art adjuster (my fav), a 20' 10mm armor prus with chinch, a 12' tachyon with a 6mm blue water and a sic isc swivel biner. all with different missions, so many climbers aren't flexible, i personally think if you can't access and work a tree with a standard lanyard (8' 1/2" with 3/8ths tenex that you adjust with two hands) and a half inch rope and two steel snaps then you need to reevaluate yourself instead of your system. A modern system is very nice, safe, and ergonomic but sometimes the arts of climbing, planning, reading the tree, and proper rope management are lost to technology. i had a guy working for me this summer that could throw a 1/2" rope and steel snap 50' accurately into the tree with a throw knot and coil. the first time i saw it i was like wtf!!! but he could do that all the time. me, i'm a throw line guy, but i can chunk a knot and slide a taunt line too; and do a least once a week, some trees are just better for old schooling. lets not teach the greenies that they have to have stuff to be successful in the tree, when forethought and proper versing in the "old school" are sometimes the best path. If you only need to rope a couple of pieces from over the house to drop a tree are you going to set up the grcs and two pulleys? or are you going to dry crotch it and do a wrap around the tree and cut the branches a little smaller? think about production, we are all in this business to make money and have fun, don't let technology and a new school only mindset hamper the bottom line, be flexible it will make you a better climber. my $.02 worth
 

Viking

New Member
Location
Columbus Ohio
YYYYYYYYYYEAAAAAHHHHHHHHH BOOOOOOOOOOOOYYYYYSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!
thanks doods, I got what I was looking for, I appreciate the free knowledge
 

oldfart

Active Member
Location
Newington, NH
I just spliced a PINTO on a prusik of 1/4" Samson Dyneema Microbull Rope. Came out very nicely. Very compact prusik, no congestion at the pulley, stays nicely set, releases easily and bites like crazy with the smaller diameter. Very strong but wouldn't make a good climbing hitch (temp spec), but for a lanyard or static prusik, I like it. Class II splices ... makes up into a 30-32" eye to eye. Luke sells it by the foot.
 

Jackohh1412

New Member
Location
Bay Area
Personally, i have four lanyards; each with different species and style of climbing in mind with the engineering of each lanyard. ask yourselves questions like why haul around 20' 10mm of lanyard and a hundred dollar adjuster to top and flop a white pine; when a 10' 5/8ths three strand and a gibbs works way better and you don't have to gum up your nice prune out gear. why wear $1500 worth of gear to prune a lob lolly and funkdefy your gear? my lanyards: a 9' 5/8ths three strand, a 18' tachyon with an art adjuster (my fav), a 20' 10mm armor prus with chinch, a 12' tachyon with a 6mm blue water and a sic isc swivel biner. all with different missions, so many climbers aren't flexible, i personally think if you can't access and work a tree with a standard lanyard (8' 1/2" with 3/8ths tenex that you adjust with two hands) and a half inch rope and two steel snaps then you need to reevaluate yourself instead of your system. A modern system is very nice, safe, and ergonomic but sometimes the arts of climbing, planning, reading the tree, and proper rope management are lost to technology. i had a guy working for me this summer that could throw a 1/2" rope and steel snap 50' accurately into the tree with a throw knot and coil. the first time i saw it i was like wtf!!! but he could do that all the time. me, i'm a throw line guy, but i can chunk a knot and slide a taunt line too; and do a least once a week, some trees are just better for old schooling. lets not teach the greenies that they have to have stuff to be successful in the tree, when forethought and proper versing in the "old school" are sometimes the best path. If you only need to rope a couple of pieces from over the house to drop a tree are you going to set up the grcs and two pulleys? or are you going to dry crotch it and do a wrap around the tree and cut the branches a little smaller? think about production, we are all in this business to make money and have fun, don't let technology and a new school only mindset hamper the bottom line, be flexible it will make you a better climber. my $.02 worth
Facts
 

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