zahn r300 reviews request!!

#1
alright zahn users time to get your reviews on your little articulated.... if you have info and pictures of the kind of wood you can lift fell free to share! I have the option to get one with dual urethane filled tires (adding 4x 92lbs of counterweight?) if anyone is having that setup how is it responding, lifting, is the turning angle reduction noticeable?
p.s. i know tracked minis are better, lift more, etc... we had one but we want a wheeled unit now.

Thanx!!
 

Magnum783

Well-Known Member
#2
If someone could help this lad and me out that would be great I too have been looking at a Zahn and would like to see some feedback.
 
#3
I have demoed a toro and a little giant unit, both wheeled Magnum783. The gas toro unit looked cheap and unfinished, while the giant looked good, i felt like its small size would inder its lifting capacity. The giant unit was équipped with a giant rotating grapple and counldnt lift à 8 ft 15inch ash log.
I didnt lift anything with the zhan but it looked sturdy and well made plus with the dual tires i Feel like i would get the best out of a small machine.
I just need confirmation....
 
#4

Might be some other Zahn videos on our YouTube channel?

We bought our first Zahn R300 4wd probably 7 or so years ago. I think we currently have 4 or 5. We run all articulating machines and own GEHLs, BME Giants and Swingers. The guys day in and day out prefer the Zahn. If there is big wood to move on the job we use a larger machine. That certainly isn't its strong suit. The Zahns advantage is nearly no turf damage... even if the ground is wet it has very little turf impact.

If you get one the highlift and dual wheel kit is a must. Don't buy one that's not 4x4 either. Fill the inner dual, but leave the outter dual air filled to reduce stress on the axle.

Hope that helps some?

I don't get on this site often you can email me at eric@treecareinc if you have further questions.
 
#5
For as lightweight as the zahn is, it does a ton of work. As treecareinc said, lifting big wood isnt really its strong suit (although it can still get some good size wood out to the street). Where it really shines is almost no turf damage (laying out plywood and alturnmats day after day sucks and with the zahn you really dont need to) and feeding chippers and getting into tight spots. Its really easy on gas and can run all sorts of attachments.

I have one up for sale now. Around 2500 hours, decent shape with bmg and bucket. 425.269.4279. Contact me if interested or if you have any other questions about the zahn in general. Thanks!
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
#6
Sounds like an AT-like axle or log arch would pair nicely with the Zahn. If it can barely lift one end, you can slide the axle under that end or somewhere toward the middle, then switch to pulling from the other end.


Maybe skidding tongs hung from mounting plate, rather than a grapple, could extend its capacity.

Its operating capacity (1/3 tip capacity) of over 800 pounds is impressive for its sub-500 pound weight.

Interesting that they have a tracked, articulated machine.
https://www.ditchwitch.com/sites/default/files/R300-2.pdf
 
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#7
Sounds like an AT-like axle or log arch would pair nicely with the Zahn. If it can barely lift one end, you can slide the axle under that end or somewhere toward the middle, then switch to pulling from the other end.


Maybe skidding tongs hung from mounting plate, rather than a grapple, could extend its capacity.

Its operating capacity (1/3 tip capacity) of over 800 pounds is impressive for its sub-500 pound weight.

Interesting that they have
Sounds like an AT-like axle or log arch would pair nicely with the Zahn. If it can barely lift one end, you can slide the axle under that end or somewhere toward the middle, then switch to pulling from the other end.


Maybe skidding tongs hung from mounting plate, rather than a grapple, could extend its capacity.

Its operating capacity (1/3 tip capacity) of over 800 pounds is impressive for its sub-500 pound weight.

Interesting that they have a tracked, articulated machine.
https://www.ditchwitch.com/sites/default/files/R300-2.pdf
Yes, paired with our stein arbor trolley it would give us a few options...
 

treebing

Well-Known Member
#8
I chose the zahn after 6 months of decision making. I like it so far. definitly a step up from the POS taskmaster I had. I got it with filled tires which gives more lifting weight. . But I'm questioning how turf friendly they will be. we are still in snow here. I'm wondering if I should get air filled turf tires for less lawn damage.especially in the soggy spring.
 

JoshR

Active Member
#9
@treebing, how is it going with the Zahn? I’m looking into one myself. Would love a mini skid but, I find myself dealing with nice lawns for the most part so, something more turf friendly makes more sense to me. Got any critiques of how it relates to treework up to this point?
 

Magnum783

Well-Known Member
#10
@treebing, how is it going with the Zahn? I’m looking into one myself. Would love a mini skid but, I find myself dealing with nice lawns for the most part so, something more turf friendly makes more sense to me. Got any critiques of how it relates to treework up to this point?
I work for a company that has one and it is great. The lift capacity is not what many other many possess that comes with is own set of trade offs. Turf damage is next to none. Lift height is fair. Ground speed is amazing. Purchase price is good as well. The controls are very friendly and the maintenance is easy and in expensive.
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
#11
@treebing, how is it going with the Zahn? I’m looking into one myself. Would love a mini skid but, I find myself dealing with nice lawns for the most part so, something more turf friendly makes more sense to me. Got any critiques of how it relates to treework up to this point?
I don't have any experience with the zahn, but you mentioned a mini in your post. I just bought a used, wheeled mini that the tires are bald. According to the salesman the previous owners preferred them to be bald to prevent lawn damage. Turning in place it will still destroy a lawn, but anything short of that and there is no damage. Here's a pic of a fairly tight 180° turn with no damage. 20180607_165553.jpg

I haven't used it enough yet to see if there are disadvantages to the lack of tread, although I assume it will probably need a tire change for snow this winter.
 

treebing

Well-Known Member
#12
I'm happy so far. lawn damage is nice not to worry about. its fast and nimble. straightforward and no marks that we were there. except if its wet and muddy
 
#13
the zhan has been good for us thus far... like the others say, it doesn't have the lifting capacity of tracked minis, but for us up here in eastern canada where trees are generally medium size it gets enough wood moving. If you need to move 30 inches oak logs all week, i would consider getting a bigger one... for the lawn damage it is day and night compare to tracks.
 

treebing

Well-Known Member
#14
speaking of lawn damage, the turf is undamaged from the wheels, but... I believe the exhaust is oriented straight down at the ground and is killing the grass where I let it idle. I leave the yard looking great but then come back. few days later and there all these brown dead spots in the grass and it looks pretty bad. anyone else have this problem? my last loader was a ram rod and it pretty much blew the exaust in my face.
 
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