When do you guys call it due to rain?

Gorman

Well-Known Member
I had to postpone a crane job this morning due to 2-3" of rain expected. We would be setting the crane in a back yard on plywood. The people understood but were a tiny bit irked.
Do you guys worked through the heavy stuff as long as there's no thunder/lightning?
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
I had to postpone a crane job this morning due to 2-3" of rain expected. We would be setting the crane in a back yard on plywood. The people understood but were a tiny bit irked.
Do you guys worked through the heavy stuff as long as there's no thunder/lightning?
We work. I try my best not to reschedule jobs. Its just a pain in my schedule and typically the client has been waiting 6 weeks for us anyways. Crane work is some of the best work that can be done in the rain. I purchased everyone on the crew the SIP rain gear and that keeps us very dry:)
Now, if its an issue with placement of the crane and the possibility of it getting stuck...then that has to be given some thought. Our crane is a smaller crane at 30 tons....yet it can get stuck very easily in wet conditions. So that is where the judgment call needs to be made. I think you made the right decision. But if we can keep our equipment on solid ground then we are working....rain or shine!!
 

christreez

Active Member
Now I work with a bunch of sallies if it's a drizzle they start to cry and we are on our way in. In previous years I would work through most anything less then a dounpour unless it was cold n miserable out. Obviously lightning shuts us down.

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Gorman

Well-Known Member
I was more concerned with the ground failing under an outrigger. A big crane tipped over in my state a few months ago due to wet ground. Granted they didn't have the boom up, just soft ground.
 

Jasonk

Active Member
I'm with Royce here. We do our damndest not to call rain days. Some days and situations do call for it though. Mats, pads etc all help!
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
Depends on the work and the degree of downpour. Productivity is low, no amount of top notch rain gear keeps me dry and I wear glasses just to see never mind as PPE. If I'll be wet and unable to see for the most part then it doesn't make sense to work in. There's also the issue of increased lawn damage even from walking and dragging brush that means more work than anticipated thus lowered productivity and reduced profit.

Drizzle is not an issue. We work the schedule with the forecast so jobs that are practical for rain days are scheduled then. As for taking heavy equipment onto lawns during a major downpour, we'll avoid that as it can easily cause way too much damage and destroy the profit.

While the rationale doesn't begin with profit, it does end there....:cool:
 

Jasonk

Active Member
Depends on the work and the degree of downpour. Productivity is low, no amount of top notch rain gear keeps me dry and I wear glasses just to see never mind as PPE. If I'll be wet and unable to see for the most part then it doesn't make sense to work in. There's also the issue of increased lawn damage even from walking and dragging brush that means more work than anticipated thus lowered productivity and reduced profit.

Drizzle is not an issue. We work the schedule with the forecast so jobs that are practical for rain days are scheduled then. As for taking heavy equipment onto lawns during a major downpour, we'll avoid that as it can easily cause way too much damage and destroy the profit.

While the rationale doesn't begin with profit, it does end there....:cool:
I understand the rationale completely. however, on those days that it's to wet to work what are the crew members doing? Are they sent home? I can't see any sizable company keeping employees busy in the shop as a mechanic is much more efficient. Training?
 

Jem4417

Well-Known Member
We work in the rain a lot but I think the absolutely miserable factor gets underlooked. You gotta work in the rain to get your pay check and get your jobs done. But sometimes I feel sub human working in it. Working eights hours in the rain, getting slopped up in the mud, slipping all over while trying to justify an acceptable level of risk sometimes a couple days in a row can mess with your head
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
We pay very close attention to the weather (or should I say my wife does). Normally if we are looking at light rain or "chance of" we push through as long as we aren't doing reduction pruning on a large slippery tree (say a tulip poplar). That being said I try to keep a few jobs in my back pocket that we can hop onto without much problem. One other very important factor that I haven't seen mentioned, that drives a lot of our decision making is our clients property. If we are working in the back yard we want o be very careful with our equipment not to destroy too much or their property. Most of our clients understand when we explain why we don't want to run the skid steer through their yard.
We also try to leave flex days in the week where I can flex a job out or slip small stuff in depending on weather. All that being said, when the crane is scheduled, its on as long as the lightning doesn't force the boom down.
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
I understand the rationale completely. however, on those days that it's to wet to work what are the crew members doing? Are they sent home? I can't see any sizable company keeping employees busy in the shop as a mechanic is much more efficient. Training?
Keeping a very close eye on the weather radar and reports enable us to better manage the work. We adjust the work to suit the weather if there's a good chance of rain. The predicted amount and rate are important. As flysquirrel mentioned and I suggested in an earlier post, impact on the yard is another factor. Pristine lawn and it's we won't work it if there will be a lot of traffic, foot or equipment. While it may recover it looks pretty bad for the short term.

Ah the misery factor, I've always found it easier to work through the rain if I'm already out and on the job. It's much harder mentally to step out into it when you're dry.

If we don't work but have made that call after we arrived then we'll fill a few hours with shop maintenance, some training but, more often it's just send the crew home. This is where it's important to make the call before people have committed to come. Myself, I have a 45 min commute to the shop so it's good to know before I leave.
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
Time of year plays a important role in the decision too. When I work in the great white north snow didn't bother is that much, except getting the big heavy truck to and from the work. But down here it can be 30 and raining or worse yet 37 and snowing big flakes (which would be better as rain).
Treehumper has it right, that call needs to be made before anyone commits resources to driving in. And if it's not made something must be found. We used to do truck maintenance. Now that I have my own stuff and no shop it's paperwork. Maintenance has to wait for a nice day. :nocausagracia:
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
Well today we called it just as it started to rain. Why? it was the rolling thunder that kept getting closer. We were at a point where we were just starting a prune and still had some clean up to do. As the storm clouds approached, I figured better clean up before the skies open up. Once that was done it didn't make sense to continue with the threat of lightning. I wasn't going to put the bucket in the air nor was I going to climb. Had there been no thunder then we would've continued to get the job done (1 1/2 trees left to do).

It was a matter of potential danger being high and cutting losses. We will see another opportunity to return and finish the job.
 

Gorman

Well-Known Member
We ended up doing that crane job today. Big big red oak. It went really well until one of my drive tires blew out on the highway.
The only reason I put off work due to rain is to save me the hassle of having to come back and fix ruts.
 
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