What kinda bug is causing these gall things in pine?

evo

Well-Known Member
Look up pitch moth. I think I see a callus from a pruning wound, which likely attracted the little buggers
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
2nd.

Zimmerman pine moth damage looks similiar but tends to attack where branches attach.
 

Philtreeman#1

Active Member
Yeah i think they may have formed around the pruning wounds. The trees are in a very narrow bed along side a gravel drive
 

Philtreeman#1

Active Member
Or is that just a callus that formed over large pruning wound? Definitely looks like some insects involved though because there is some orange frass. Could the insects be secondary? Just not seeing anything on the pitch moths that looks quite like it.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Or is that just a callus that formed over large pruning wound? Definitely looks like some insects involved though because there is some orange frass. Could the insects be secondary? Just not seeing anything on the pitch moths that looks quite like it.
I wouldn’t call it a burl per say. Pitch moths typically go for branch collars causing limb failure in some cases. Swollen collars can be signs of some bugs infestations, but I think of it as a ebb and flow of wounding and response growth. Not unlike a target canker where the fungi kills the cambium then the tree starts callusing and then the next year it’s the fungus turn. Depending on the vigor of the tree and the persistence of the organism will determine the outcome
 

Philtreeman#1

Active Member
I wouldn’t call it a burl per say. Pitch moths typically go for branch collars causing limb failure in some cases. Swollen collars can be signs of some bugs infestations, but I think of it as a ebb and flow of wounding and response growth. Not unlike a target canker where the fungi kills the cambium then the tree starts callusing and then the next year it’s the fungus turn. Depending on the vigor of the tree and the persistence of the organism will determine the outcome
Yes that makes sense? Any recomended treatment?
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Usually a borer rate of a pyrethroid or perhaps carbaryl has historically been used but Acelepryn has labeling for clear wing moths as well. This is assuming we have the critter(s) narrowed down correctly.

First I would assess overall health because many a tree can pitch them out effectively. Cultural stress management es muy importante when it comes to trees and borers.
 

Philtreeman#1

Active Member
Cultural practices have been very poor. Way too many limbs got removed, trees are in very narrow bed no wider than root flare next to gravel drive with neighbors house being vacant for years without proper irrigation, & i think that fabric may have had some girdling effects. (Come on we're gardeners, not taylors, folks! )
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I’ve heard digging the little F’ers out with a knife or poking tool and crushing their heads is the only non chemical alternative. Always best for preventative cultural control. The tree looks a little stressed. What species of pine? And location?
 
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