What Keeps You Safe?

#23
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striving not to be a hack that gives tree guys a bad name....

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Amen to that brother! -----------> www.not-a-hacker.com


But, on the serious notion: I stay safe for my wife and kids. If I die or am injured for life, it would dramatically change our family dynamics.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
#25
[ QUOTE ]

Don't get too cocky Daniel or God might just bittch slap ya back to put you in your place. Despite having you and your crew protected every day.

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You got that right X...
I've been extra cautious this spring, mostly because I judge myself as gettign a little too cocky here on the buzz and know that God has a quick and powerful method for keeping me humble.. When I get too full of myself, I know its coming.. Tell you the truth, that is the reason I moved up over that oak lead..
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
#26
That's good feedback for me too Frax..

When I first started working with Big John I had been in the business for 20 years and didn't know much. I would look at his technique, (especially his pick of over head anchor point for the rigging block) (etc) and wonder what was he thinking.. I'd have no clue why.. and I learned that he did it that way for a reason... a reason that was beyond me..

Its human insticnt to see soemthing that you don't understand and think that he must be doing it wrong.. I had to resist that type of thinking and just try to learn. If I asked him a question about his choices, it was with that humility. Sometime I'd think about something he did for a month or two, and sometimes it took years to really get a grasp of it, and I AM sure I missed some things all together too.

May have a tree coming down tomorrow that makes for some good video.. Glad you are enjoying them.. Might just pop the cherry on the helmet cam for this cut..

ps.. no one here thinks you're a weenie LOL...


[ QUOTE ]
I look forward to Daniel videos. For awhile I thought maybe he'd gotten himself killed and we would all be the poorer for it.
Why do I like the Daniel vids so much? I have a bit of training and only a little experience in rigging. I watch the vid and make mental notes before I read the thread.

"Oh crap, really?"

"That looks scary to me but maybe I'm just a weenie"

"why the f would it be done that way, and not this way that seems logical to me?"

"But what do I know, there must be a reason for it. Maybe I'll find out what that is."

Then, I read all your comments and compare my thoughts to your feedback. I feel good when my instinct, inexperienced though it is matches the general concensus. I feel like I really am learning something.

Thanks Daniel. Glad you're still with us. Seriously, I never want to hear that one of the TreeBuzz Family got hurt.

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#27
Every tree I step back close my eyes and picture the processe in my head. Listen to my gut if I get nerves something is not right, calm nerves job on. As for the man upstairs I tell him not to laugh and pat my friends on the back for a good day.Smile before the shot goes into the tree cause I know the law of Murphy will yield his humor on me sometime(watched my throw weight bounce off a 1" branch and out into a cow pasture dropping 3" from a pie). Every night I come home spend time with the teens (not kids anymore), and wearing the rubber bands they got my just not the one the boy got me that goes in my pocket.
 

RopeShield

Well-Known Member
#29
[ QUOTE ]
pay attention to every little mishap, miscommunication, close call etc, implement a remedial strategy for every one. Pray on every job before the saw starts. watch the new guys out of the corner of your eye all day long.. stop and observe them when they aren't looking.. get on their case when you see unsafe behavior or better yet, get them off the crew.. Having co-workers you can trust to keep as much of an eye on everyone and everything as you do (thank GOD). take no chances with personal safety, like you might take a small chance with a fence..

ON Monday I was taking a 10" top out of a big leaning oak, flying the boom under one lead to reach out to the far lead to set the rigging and make the cut.. tree not only had a good bit of lean, but also had signs of serious structural issues at the base. I had already significantly lightened up the lead I was under, so I was 99.99% sure there was no way the tree was going to fail at the base when this piece landed in the rigging. BUT since my life was on the line, 99.99% was not good enough. I started the top cut with the chainsaw, then flew the boom around to the far side of the lead I was under, and finished the cut with a pole saw.. I actually felt a little silly doing it that way. SO I guess that's another thing.. don't let your pride keep from looking or feeling a little silly, when its a matter of life and death..

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Pole saw has kept me safe many many times!

I have worked with many different people all of very different personalities and breeds in Southern Ontario.

I will never forget it said many times with one of my first tree employers subs "any day is a good day to Die!"
Because if you choose wrong in this work it is likely you will die or worse you will die from the pain of being injured to the point that you will not be able to do what you are born to do. Touching and caring for trees!

Plus I hate pain!

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/today_is_a_good_day_to_die
 

Attachments

#30
Staying in touch with arborists everywhere keeps me from isolating into my own little world. The great network of arbs here helps me to question what I do, why I do it, and how I can do it better and safer.

Thanks everyone.
 

Frax

Well-Known Member
#31
[ QUOTE ]
Staying in touch with arborists everywhere keeps me from isolating into my own little world. The great network of arbs here helps me to question what I do, why I do it, and how I can do it better and safer.

Thanks everyone.

[/ QUOTE ]

X2 Zeb!
This place helps narrow the physical gap for those of us who are far away. I actually feel like I'm part of a larger community. Grabbing a cold one and seeing what you all have been up to that day or to learn something from you is awhat I look forward to after a day at work.
 
#32
Walking through the door at my house at the end of the day is indeed success! Keeping a lid on conversation, distractions like phones, angry working, and complacency helps to mitigate something stupid from happening. I've seen too many people in any industry in not caring mode. It is especially disturbing in ours.

Things happen really fast, and we are only so fast as humans to react. Sometimes there is no chance of reacting. That's why thinking through what is about to happen, checking for people in the danger zone, and clearly communicating your idea to your help is the minimum required before any action is made.

Coming back from the "...if I only..." feeling is hard. One way to honor this feeling is to do it differently the next time you are in a similar circumstance. Remember that feeling and the lesson learned, and speak, act, or don't act accordingly.

There was an accident recently where a bucket truck driver dumped the truck, and then drove off with the boom in the air, took a corner and rolled the truck. It's hard to blame anyone but the driver, but honestly, the mistake was foreseeable. His behavior at work was speeding up exponentially. Even down to rolling out with the PTO engaged, while lowering the chip body on a chip truck. Too fast.

What we do can sometimes be mundane, and boring (Bradford pear prune), but the fact stands that we chose to be the workers we are. We need to stay devoted and interested in our work. I believe that is the most important thing that keeps me safe during my day. I work with love. I love thinking through the problems each tree presents. I love using my tools to accomplish something much larger than myself, and I love my life.

It's the self preservation thing some people don't have, and it pays for everyone to identify those with it, and those without.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
#33
Walking through the door at my house at the end of the day is indeed success! Keeping a lid on conversation, distractions like phones, angry working, and complacency helps to mitigate something stupid from happening. I've seen too many people in any industry in not caring mode. It is especially disturbing in ours.

Things happen really fast, and we are only so fast as humans to react. Sometimes there is no chance of reacting. That's why thinking through what is about to happen, checking for people in the danger zone, and clearly communicating your idea to your help is the minimum required before any action is made.

Coming back from the "...if I only..." feeling is hard. One way to honor this feeling is to do it differently the next time you are in a similar circumstance. Remember that feeling and the lesson learned, and speak, act, or don't act accordingly.

There was an accident recently where a bucket truck driver dumped the truck, and then drove off with the boom in the air, took a corner and rolled the truck. It's hard to blame anyone but the driver, but honestly, the mistake was foreseeable. His behavior at work was speeding up exponentially. Even down to rolling out with the PTO engaged, while lowering the chip body on a chip truck. Too fast.

What we do can sometimes be mundane, and boring (Bradford pear prune), but the fact stands that we chose to be the workers we are. We need to stay devoted and interested in our work. I believe that is the most important thing that keeps me safe during my day. I work with love. I love thinking through the problems each tree presents. I love using my tools to accomplish something much larger than myself, and I love my life.

It's the self preservation thing some people don't have, and it pays for everyone to identify those with it, and those without.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
Damn bri, shits deep!
Well said
 

LimbLoppa

Well-Known Member
#34
Three things Respect, Love and Fear. RESPECT for those that bless me with their knowledge and for the fact that what I love doing so much could possibly kill me. LOVE that I have for this industry and most importantly my family-which reminds me to make good decisions when even my own mind doesn't. FEAR of all the dangers inclusive to this line of work and that I may be robbed of the joys of treework if I make (1) bad decision.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
#39
Yes, great thread.

I PLAN to work safely and then take PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY to make that happen.

I read once about greats in various dangerous fields of endeavor, high wire acts etc. The author cited different people (cases) and described how each of them had, before their death, started to entertain the thought that they were going to fall some day.

I refuse to "entertain" any such thoughts. My body moves differently when I know I'm going to "crush" this removal job than when I am questioning outcomes or concerned.
 

BRT

Well-Known Member
#40
1. Take it one step at a time.
2. Follow your gut instinct.
3. Never get in a hurry.

The words of a great tree man. They buzz around my head all the time.
 
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