using BackBone as an aerial brake

Discussion in 'Rigging and Roping' started by robinia, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. robinia

    robinia Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty excited to get my hands on a SafeBlok, so in the mean time it got me thinking.
    Seems to me that my BackBone had some possibilities and turns out its true. I don't use it all that much for it's 'day job' and I always love tools with multiple uses.
    So here's how I set it up for aerial friction.

    Minimal friction:
    photo 1.JPG



    More friction:
    This wrap can be added or removed without having to reeve the rope again.
    photo 2.JPG



    Maximum friction
    This one has to be reeved. No way to add on the fly. photo 3.JPG
    More wraps are possible but I think it would be heading into twist and hockle land.


    Soft lock:
    photo 4.JPG


    So far it works well for medium duty rigging. I haven't dropped any logs into it yet though.
    The bend radius at the top isn't great but that can be managed with redirects.

    Pros:
    Simple.
    Bomb proof.
    Easily adjusted degrees of friction (without having to re-weave the rope).
    No Twisting or hockling (so far...).
    Soft lockable.

    Cons:
    Sort of heavy (Compared to a SafeBlok? Likely similar to AFB)
    Minimal bend radius in top eye.
     
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  2. NE Tree

    NE Tree Well-Known Member

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    Great idea
     
  3. Treetopflyer

    Treetopflyer Well-Known Member

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    Throw a ring in a loop and prusik it on so it sits even with top eye that's girthed to the rigline, if it mates well and it fits that could solve the bend radius issue.
     
  4. monkeylove

    monkeylove Well-Known Member

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    They are on sale for 15% off right now, been thinking about getting 1 or 2. What the heck I own to much already what's a few more pieces of gear.
     
  5. deevo

    deevo Well-Known Member

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    Good idea ! Mines at the bottom of my one rigging bag ( somewhere !) I'll give it a try!
     
  6. flyingsquirrel25

    flyingsquirrel25 Well-Known Member

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    I experimented with my tree angle about a month ago. Loaded it much like an f8 except I didn't pass the loop over the top, just the ears. I was only playing with it for a couple pieces and didn't get a chance to really work with it. I liked it, a bit much for friction but I had both ears in. I will have to try it again and see what turns up.
     
  7. monkeylove

    monkeylove Well-Known Member

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    I just ordered 1 last night. I hear they are good for Pine work also. lol.
     
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  8. ModernDruid

    ModernDruid New Member

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    Did you ever add a ring for bend radius, this seems like a cheaper alternative to the new triple thimble if bend radius can be addressed.

    Also I wonder if the small backbone would work as well.
     
  9. Treetopflyer

    Treetopflyer Well-Known Member

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    I use the setup I mention above with a dmm rigging hub and it works great . I've floated some large oak tops onto it. Never big wood..
     
  10. robinia

    robinia Well-Known Member

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    No, I never did try that. The safeblock showed up pretty soon after that! Don't think I played with this much after that.

    I've never held the small backbone. From the photos it looked to be a smaller diameter stock maybe?
     
  11. ModernDruid

    ModernDruid New Member

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    I'm on a budget and trying to figure the most cost effective aerial friction. Safebloc, triple thimble, or backbone with a medium or large xring.

    How is your safebloc in comparison? Would a backbone be able to block out a small spar?
     
  12. ModernDruid

    ModernDruid New Member

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  13. robinia

    robinia Well-Known Member

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    I was just tinkering really. It was fine for light rigging but it's totally outside it's intended use.
    My opinion, having used all that stuff, go with the safeblock. Works great. Takes a beating, simple, can handle big stuff.
    My back bone just gathers dust.
     
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  14. GreenstoneVT

    GreenstoneVT Member

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    ModernDruid If cost is a serious consideration, you'd be amazed at what you can accomplish with an inexpensive rescue 8 or two (or 3 haha) and still be at half the cost of a safebloc. Midline attachable and work great as redirects, especially in a fishing pole setup. Outside of fishing pole rigging I run mine with an Omni 2.6. Might notice a midline attachable theme here - nothing like taking that last look before cutting, deciding you want more friction, and realizing the time it'll take to pull the rope back and reroute it through another hole versus throwing a loop runner around the tree and hooking another 8 on. I was just recently chunking out 6-8', 8" spruce at my house using my 13 yr old as groundie, 2 8s (one by me in the tree, one at the base as a redirect), and no problems.
    I somewhat recently misplaced my portawrap and my dad stopped teaching rappelling which left me with a lot of spare 8s lying around so I got creative. I'm actually liking it more for anything I don't need a basal bollard for. I find the initial friction gentler and overall friction to be a little more consistent.
     
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  15. deevo

    deevo Well-Known Member

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    I’ve got them all, the triple thimble is the best of them all for aerial friction, use 3/4 tenex for the sling and you’ll be happy!
     
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  16. Crimsonking

    Crimsonking Well-Known Member

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    I used my triple thimble last week on a large red maple removal. It was for family, and only my grandfather and great uncle were there to help at first, so I set max friction on the TT and had one medium x ring redirect. I let the pieces run on their own and then managed the rope from in tree while my family finished landing them and untying the rope. The loading of the rope when I cut would send the brush down till the tips landed, and then it would stop til I put a hand on the rope. It worked wonderfully. Eventually my uncle arrived and was able to lower larger pieces, still without a bollard.

    The triple thimble is a great device, and has my vote.

    I must note that we did not rig spar wood that day, though I have before with the TT. Small spar wood should be no problem without a bollard, but pull out the porty to help with the big stuff.
     
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  17. ModernDruid

    ModernDruid New Member

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    I think the triple thimble is where I'll spend my money then. It seems like the safebloc could have some rope on rope issues.
     
  18. ModernDruid

    ModernDruid New Member

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    Do you have any issues with your rope twisting up after running it through a rescue 8? With using an 8 instead of a porty Ive seen extremely twisted ropes.

    Such an easy way to add friction almost anywhere.
     
  19. GreenstoneVT

    GreenstoneVT Member

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    Nope. The ears/horns of the rescue 8 prevent the girth hitching problems common with a normal 8 and allow a soft lock off by wrapping the tail over the top. One of my favorite techniques is to run 2 rigging lines (plus 2 pull/tag lines if needed) alternating drops. As soon as my first cut is away I grab/pull up the other rope and start tying off the second. By the time someone gets the first one down to the ground and untied I usually already have the second branch tied off and am headed up to switch which rope is running through the Omni (the swivel on that is a godsend). I tend to leave an 8 on each rope so that tail weight doesn't pull it through down to the ground when I'm not looking. On heavier stuff I'll get a little tricky: setting the first r8 tight so as to provide instant friction, leaving the second r8 with 12-18" of rope movement before engaging, and, if I need a third, leaving that with approx 24-30" of play. This way they engage sequentially and not simultaneously, thereby lessening shock loading and providing a smoother drop. Not as good as an experienced groundie who knows how to let it run but a viable alternative.
     
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