Unique Training Opportunity

Tony

Well-Known Member
#1
Everywhere I travel for training, work or just spend time with tree folks I hear the same story. "I just can't find enough good people." So we at NATS sat down and thought about why we got into the industry, why we stick with it, what we wish we would have known or been told when we were starting out, what we would change about our careers. We took all that and more and developed Arborist Boot Camp. For those 0 to 3 years in the field we give what has been and what should have been given to us in an intensive, demanding team oriented 5 days that will change the way you see the industry.

Class 001 was success, now we have spots available for class 002. Help us help you. Spread the word, get in touch, be proactive and help me promote this program.

Registration info here: https://northamericantrainingsolutions.com/arborist-boot-camp-october-28-november-2-la/





 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
#2
Interesting concept. I can see the validity of what you are trying to do. I have my own personal opinions on the paramilitary approach to it and the "not everyone will make it" but that's just me. Good luck and success to you.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
#3
Interesting concept. I can see the validity of what you are trying to do. I have my own personal opinions on the paramilitary approach to it and the "not everyone will make it" but that's just me. Good luck and success to you.
Steve,

Your reading too much into it. The program is designed so no individual can succeed alone, much like tree work. If arboriculture is not a pursuit, but just a paycheck your best off staying home as well, because this program is the starting line for a marathon, not a sprint.

We took concepts and a term from the military, but it is far from "paramilitary."

Thanks for the comment, hope I explained it better.

Tony
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
#4
Yes sir you did. Being a vet and spending 25 years in a paramilitary organization where the strongest leadership and the ability to follow that leadership is a life or death matter, I feel the true “boot camp” style training has its place but can easily be blown greatly out of proportion. In the traditional model of boot camp training your goal is to literally beat rebellious children into submission so when the order comes to take the hill at any cost they do what they are told. Not applicable to all industries and certainly not the leadership model of a noncaptive work force. Leadership via intimidation, fear, and the threat of physical and mental punishment. I’m glad I was reading into it.

I love the aspect of team building. Absolutely essential for any group related task especially what we do. I appreciate your response. As long as somebody half my age isn’t screaming in my face an making me do push-ups as punishment, sounds like fun.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
#5
We took the team building aspects and mental toughness aspects of military training and combined them what what we know and practice as the best of NATS Training.

Is the course hard? Yes. Is it physically and mentally challenging? Yes. Will you learn valuable technical skills to help improve you safety and efficiency? Yes. Will you learn how to treat your body as an athlete does, how to care for yourself through training, rest and recovery? Yes.

Will all this happen in 5 short days? No. The idea is to take the raw energy and enthusiasm of those new to the industry and channel it in a safe and productive manner from the start. To be rid of how I, and many here, learned so many of the skills we posses, trial followed error heavily doused with luck.

There is no yelling and screaming in anyones' face. If we do our jobs well, we'll say to the most as trainers when I say nothing at all.

Thanks for the opportunity to clarify Steve.

Tony
 
#6
Interesting approach. Are you targeting any particular audience or age groups, like community colleges and at-risk youth? The videos seem to promote a regimented and militaristic attitude, focusing just on tree care/management, but the work involving canopy research and Eco-restoration is also a significant aspect of tree climbing and involves similar kinds of team building and problem solving efforts. Are you bringing that to the table too?
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
#7
Interesting approach. Are you targeting any particular audience or age groups, like community colleges and at-risk youth? The videos seem to promote a regimented and militaristic attitude, focusing just on tree care/management, but the work involving canopy research and Eco-restoration is also a significant aspect of tree climbing and involves similar kinds of team building and problem solving efforts. Are you bringing that to the table too?
John,

The course is designed with production tree work in mind so we cover everything from chainsaw to rigging and climbing. All at a fairly basic level as the target is 0-3 years in the industry. So the target is not necessarily an age group, but more an experience level in the industry.

As for canopy research and the like, the course could certainly be applied as we cover not just moving trees and tree parts to the ground, but implementation of mechanical advantage, climbing concepts and the idea of resiliency in all of our systems among many other rarely addressed areas of tree work.

One of the things I enjoy is that we have a small class size (each class is limited to 12) and we can discuss more of the "philosophical" side of the work as well as the technical. Rarely do I, as a trainer, get the opportunity to move beyond the "how" and into the "why" in skill related courses. Fo me that has been a realm reserved for writing and lecture ventures.

As always the best lessons are not the skills themselves, but the attitude, the perseverance and the discipline to be productive at any task not just tree related ones, but using production tree work as a medium.

I had an opportunity to chat with T.C. Mazar on his podcast The Arb Life a few days ago and we delved briefly into some of these ideas. Find it here: http://www.thearblife.com/the-arb-life-027/

As of now our marketing is general in nature, but that may/will change as the program grows and evolves.

Tony
 
#8
Tony, I like your vision, approach and your methods. I too offer training, but my services may be less intense, focusing more on rec-climbers. Your approach seems to provide broad range of skill sets that go beyond just arb tree work, and integrating your boot camp approach seems well suited to building a successful team. Alternatively, my vision is to bridge the nexus between beginning rec climbers, to those wanting to be fully self-equipped and self-sufficient rec-climbers. My services focus on both the physical mechanics of climbing, positioning, etc., as well as, the more spiritual aspects of being able to sharpen one's focus while connecting with nature in a profoundly meaningful way.
 
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Tony

Well-Known Member
#10
I as well... but since I find it so rarely I figured I’d build it in others.

The more I travel and train, the more convinced I am that young people entering this field seldom have good role models. The one that do tend to stick with it. My influence as one can only go so far, so we decided to develop a program to build an “Army”

And now we have nicley segued back to the beginning...

Tony
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
#11
Thanks all for the opportunity to discuss this. One of the limitations was naming this course as we did and we fully realized there may be some well founded misconceptions. I appreciate your input and the platform to explain.

I have one ask. Please spread the word, let those who will benefit from this course know about it and steer them in our direction. The course cost is all inclusive, so once you are on site food and lodging is covered.

If we do not change our industry, then who will?

Tony
 
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