Two seperate lanyards

Jan_

Active Member
Do you guys ever use 2 seperate lanyards instead of one single or double lanyard? I'm currently thinking about whether I should get a long 30-50" lanyard or a second 20-30" one. I think two seperate lanyards could be less cluttered and easier to use, but I'd like to hear some opinions from you guys.
 

Jan_

Active Member
I currently have a 15ft lanyard which I often find to short because I have to use it in a SRS configuration if I want to ascend any helpful distance on it. It works in most cases, but If I have my main TIP on a low limb I usually try to ascend past that limb with my lanyard so I have something to stand on.
A second/double lanyard could give me more flexibility if I then want to advance my lanyard quickly/stabilise myself with the side D's.
 

Cereal_Killer

Active Member
Honestly I don't even use a lanyard anymore for rec climbing, I make my main ascent SRT and carry the tail of my rope setup in a doubled rope setup. If I'm gonna get real crazy and try some sort of traverse or something I'll leave the end of my main climb line on the ground (but still setup as a doubled rope system incase I need to pull it up and use it) and then take an entire other climb line (a 100' piece of Reep setup in doubled rope system) with me as my "lanyard". I'm on vacation now, been doing lots of climbing and didn't even pack a lanyard with me, haven't missed it yet.


Work climbing I still use both ends of my main line as described above but I will carry a 15' lanyard incase I need to attach to the tree while I rearrange how ropes are running.


In the rare event rec climbing where I do need to lanyard in (super unlikely with my climbing style and the fact I technically have 2 or 3 systems with me) I just girth hitch a loop runner to a stem and connect that to my bridge while I do whatever task it is that calls for that.

You can see me employee all these techniques in bob_bobs "2 climbers 1 tree" videos.
 
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Cereal_Killer

Active Member
I just do not like hanging from my side D's, it severely limits your range of motion and its just not comfy. That's why I've gotten away from the traditional lanyard... Even when I do use an actual lanyard I attach to my upper D's or turn it into a mini dbrt system and clip directly to my bridge ring.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
I just do not like hanging from my side D's, it severely limits your range of motion and its just not comfy. That's why I've gotten away from the traditional lanyard... Even when I do use an actual lanyard I attach to my upper D's or turn it into a mini dbrt system and clip directly to my bridge ring.
I rarely use my lanyard on my side-D’s, typically when i’m on spikes doing a take-down. I use a carabiner on the end of my 15’ lanyard and use it doubled or in choked mode for SRS attached to my bridge.
-AJ
 
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John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
It really comes down to one's preference, I guess. When you climb tall conifers for example, using a double ended SRT method enables you to reach the TIP, then use the other end of the climbing line, either to advance or reposition yourself. The downside is having to lug 150 feet or more of rope through the canopy every time you advance, even when only going short distances. Alternatively you could substitute using the tail end of your primary climbing line, for another say 50 foot lanyard, and using a double ended system, your can flop flop your way up to the top of the tree, using either end of the long lanyard. The lanyard could run like a normal lanyard, but more often than not, you'll probably find yourself using a center attachment with a 50 foot climbing line for either SRT or DdRT. The pro is that you can more easily maneuver within the canopy and pull less rope through when advancing. You also have the option to haul the long lanyard up to the TIP before you even leave the ground, so its not weighting on your saddle and it'll be there when you need it. If you are relying completely on the lanyard and no longer connected to your primary climbing line, you may not always be able to abort the climb and reach the ground without a climbing line switchover in a possible emergency situation. IMHO, there's a lot to be said for always having a your own dedicated line to the ground, or some way to make a relatively quick and safe descent to the ground at all times, so there's that to consider too.
 
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Nish

Well-Known Member
I'm jazzed with the long double lanyard that @DavidRicks just spliced and assembled for me. Just got it last night, but David and some of the other innovative climbing pros are apparently rocking these to great effect. Should be great for passing branches or extending into one long lanyard. The rated becket on the pinto will be the ideal re-attachment point for that first carabiner when the one side is used, especially at full length for a kind of second climb line. I'll probably keep the first part on the lower Ds, using the upper Ds if I deploy the second part.

60860
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yoyoman

Well-Known Member
I spend most of my time climbing towards the ends of my climbing line rather than the typical, climbing towards the middle. That being said, I have much less need for a lanyard but most always carry a short 12-foot one to assist when I'm configuring ends.
 
Do you guys ever use 2 seperate lanyards instead of one single or double lanyard? I'm currently thinking about whether I should get a long 30-50" lanyard or a second 20-30" one. I think two seperate lanyards could be less cluttered and easier to use, but I'd like to hear some opinions from you guys.
Hey Jan,
For me it totally depends upon what kind of tree I'm climbing or the type of work that I need to accomplish. The size of the tree and how thick or sparse the canopy is helps me determine what length of rope I'll need. For instance, say your limb walking or, limb crawling. Two points of attachment are real nice for positioning and support. I climb a lot of big Live Oaks and Laurel Oaks. Many branches are long and lanky. I have set up and use several different lengths for a lanyard but, have found that a another rope that is 60' long with a hitch climber set is best for me. That will allow me 60' SRT or 30' DDRT. I find this length of rope to be awesome for so many different scenarios. It can be hauled up when needed or carried upon ascent. It's extra weight for sure but, it allows me so many options that its worth it for me.

I always carry a 15' lanyard with me to safety in or, to position me to throw for another attachment point or, even just to toss me main climbing system for a branch for a redirect. Like I said it really does depend on the species of tree and its size.

Enjoy The Climb
 

Jan_

Active Member
Thanks for all you input, I think I am now just going to buy myself a 30ft long piece of rope and then I'll see how much use I get out of it, in both a double adjuster configuration and combined with my other lanyard. My main rope is currently only 100ft which makes using the tail impractical most of the time, I'll also get a 150ft rope in the near future though so I'll see which possibilities I have with that.
Also @Cereal_Killer: My first ever thread on here was about hanging in side D's, general consensus was that they are just not made for that. I also mostly use my lanyard in my main attachment point.
 
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Rob Stafari

Member
I use a ~23' lanyard and often wish it was a little longer. 30-35 ft lanyard is on the wish list, I think that is an excellent choice. I also utilize the tail of my climb line at times, but prefer something that is right on my hip ready to deploy.
 
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