Twin bridges on treemo

TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
Would this be a stevidor knot in a slip knot configuration? I doubt the tail follows the path, but this is a often forgotten rule. Keep it simple and easily identifiable that it’s tied correctly
That thought crossed my mind, so I tied one and it did not look the same.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
No, it wasn't tied that way. Mine is more like a stopper knot on a carabiner with an extra 3rd wrap. I think there are a bunch of knot names that mean the same thing and I'll let Richard use his testing gear to determine which ones are better/worse and how many kNs it can handle. A 3-wrap barrel/scaffold/fishermans/stopper knot are all pretty much identical, regardless of the different names people may attribute to it. Rather than split hairs and debate knot names, the better question to ask is if it's better to put two wraps around the d-rings, or one-wrap around the d-ring and two or three wraps around the rope-bridge, in a stopper/scaffold/barrel-knot like way.
 
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TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
No, it wasn't tied that way. Mine is more like a stopper knot on a carabiner with an extra 3rd wrap. I think there are a bunch of knot names that mean the same thing and I'll let Richard use his testing gear to determine which ones are better/worse and how many kNs it can handle. A 3-wrap barrel/scaffold/fishermans/stopper knot are all pretty much identical, regardless of the different names people may attribute to it. Rather than split hairs and debate knot names, the better question to ask is if it's better to put two wraps around the d-rings, or one-wrap around the d-ring and two or three wraps around the rope-bridge, in a stopper/scaffold/barrel-knot like way.
It's important for communications sake that we call things what they are supposed to be called. It's not splitting hairs. Your knots bear no resemblance to scaffold knots.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
No, it wasn't tied that way. Mine is more like a stopper knot on a carabiner with an extra 3rd wrap. I think there are a bunch of knot names that mean the same thing and I'll let Richard use his testing gear to determine which ones are better/worse and how many kNs it can handle. A 3-wrap barrel/scaffold/fishermans/stopper knot are all pretty much identical, regardless of the different names people may attribute to it. Rather than split hairs and debate knot names, the better question to ask is if it's better to put two wraps around the d-rings, or one-wrap around the d-ring and two or three wraps around the rope-bridge, in a stopper/scaffold/barrel-knot like way.
Sorry but what is tied with the white rope is none of the above. Yes the many names for the same knot can be confusing for sure.
This is NOT something to be pig headed about though. Please check your self, and if you want to experiment with different knots feel free. Just do your testing, and make sure you know what to call it.

With all rope work common knots are used. Not only because they work well, but because that can be easily identified when tied correctly. This is exactly what is going on with this situation, you are saying it’s one thing (which it’s not) and no one can ID it to verify if is safe.

Now I think I know what you tied, and while it might hold. It is a very poor choice to be repeatedly loaded and unloaded which could cause it to loosen and the tail to slip out.

This is kind of the danger I was bringing up with rec climbers trying to become an authority on the subject. Slow down and learn. I get that we all start from somewhere, and many of us were brought into the industry. Innovation is great and can come from anywhere.
 
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John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the lecture. If you were to observe this knot being tied, you'd realize it's both safe and utilized by numerous climbers, including Kevin Bingham, as shown in the SRT/TreeStuff video. While I stepped up to address the question put forth in this thread, I've seen no other responses other than mine, which resulted in my being slammed to hell and back. Lets see what you have to offer and lets all be the judge of that.
 

TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the lecture. If you were to observe this knot being tied, you'd realize it's both safe and utilized by numerous climbers, including Kevin Bingham, as shown in the SRT/TreeStuff video. While I stepped up to address the question put forth in this thread, I've seen no other responses other than mine, which resulted in my being slammed to hell and back. Lets see what you have to offer and lets all be the judge of that.
teach me what it is then.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the lecture. If you were to observe this knot being tied, you'd realize it's both safe and utilized by numerous climbers, including Kevin Bingham, as shown in the SRT/TreeStuff video. While I stepped up to address the question put forth in this thread, I've seen no other responses other than mine, which resulted in my being slammed to hell and back. Lets see what you have to offer and lets all be the judge of that.
I use a double fisherman’s/ scaffold etc tied directly onto the dee’s. Ring through both bridges and a swivel on the stock.

The only reason I have a backup is because I use the yo-yo man rollin lock on the stock bridge, which I don’t entirely like a cammed devise at a primary life support attachment.
 

Boconnor303

Member
I just run a second TreeMo bridge with fisherman's on the lower Ds... with a little slack taken out of the original to equalize the two.
20190212_115032.jpg
Plenty of space for lanyard carabiners in the lower Ds with the bridge there as well.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
This is the knot. It's not a Steveadore.

Oh boy, now bashing my head against a wall. It looks like we need a new name in the double overhand knot family.

To me it is a undressed triple overhand tied onto the working end. A stevedore is a double overhand dressed differently. A double overhand tied around the working end is a scaffold/grape vine.

Now we are just arguing names. It’s the same construction just dressed and set differently. This difference is important because it can cause the knot to behave differently and potentially become unstable.
 

TallTreeClimber

Well-Known Member
This is my first exposure to this unconventional knot. I don't believe it's in either of my books and I've never seen it before online or otherwise.

It does need some type of name though.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Crap not that im really doing anything anyway.. for clarity I’m just going to do doubles..

stevedore to double overhand. Never in ties just dressed differently
image.jpgimage.jpg

Take the left hand turn, open it and pass it over to the right. Now dress and set
image.jpgimage.jpg
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Oh boy, now bashing my head against a wall. It looks like we need a new name in the double overhand knot family.

To me it is a undressed triple overhand tied onto the working end. A stevedore is a double overhand dressed differently. A double overhand tied around the working end is a scaffold/grape vine.

Now we are just arguing names. It’s the same construction just dressed and set differently. This difference is important because it can cause the knot to behave differently and potentially become unstable.
Maybe the more important question is if it's safer using just a two wrap or a three wrap. I'm guessing 3 is better than 2, but 2 usually is needed if the bridge length doesn't have enough slack.
 
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