TreeMotion Vs. Onyx

#1
I'm in the market for a new saddle. Got to try on the TreeMotion and TreeMotion S. light today. I really liked them both, but am curious about the New Tribe Onyx. Could anyone tell me how the Onyx would differ from the TM? I'm using a Buckingham glide now.
 
#3
They're both sweet rides. It comes down to personal preference. I'm waiting the new TM s to come out with the dual rope ridge and updated d's. If I had to decide on a harness right now, I'd easily flip a coin between the two and maybe look at the Notch Sentinel too. The Onyx may be better suited for a production climber, than a competitive climber, but both are bad ass harnesses, imho.
 
#4
The onyx is a very different saddle. I have a Petzl Sequoia and a new tribe onyx that I just bought. The sequoia shared a lot with the TM, in design, but imo, the tree motion looks better quality and comfort than the sequoia.
As for the onyx. I think it has some really great features. I love the triangular leg pads, the wide back pad is nice, and it has more gear storage options than the TM, in stock fashion. I also feel the onyx would make a good production harness, it seems extremely durable and bombproof materials are used. With that said, I’m sending my onyx back to treestuff. The way the front of the bridge is designed, it made the leg pads ride up and dig in in the junk, and the back pad was too thin and bit into my hip. The onyx would be an incredible harness, but lacks padding. I really don’t think it has any padding whatsoever. I’m a thin guy and have been struggling to find a harness that I like. I will be trying a monkey beaver and then a tree motion if I can’t find comfort in the monkey beaver
 
#6
I do seem to be small for a climber. I'm about 140 lbs. One of the problems I have with the glide is that anytime I'm in spurs, or in a position where my weight is more in the saddle than the tree it gets uncomfortable pretty quickly.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
#7
The way the front of the bridge is designed, it made the leg pads ride up and dig in in the junk
I use an onyx and Saxx ballpark pouch underpants. No pinching, no digging. Before I bought Saxx, I got pinched occassionally. Thought that would be common to all saddles, but maybe not?... I've only ever used an onyx.
 
#8
I use an onyx and Saxx ballpark pouch underpants. No pinching, no digging. Before I bought Saxx, I got pinched occassionally. Thought that would be common to all saddles, but maybe not?... I've only ever used an onyx.
I think the onyx is good, it just had issues that I feel the monkey beaver will not have
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#9
The Onyx is a saddle that takes quite a bit of time to get dialed in, but once done you will be rewarded with a kick ass, comfy ride. I was never a fan of the Onyx until a buddy of mine who has ridden one for years told me to dial it in. There is a small strap and retainer on the leg straps that can be used to keep the leg pads tighter on the thighs, which keeps the leg pads from riding up and pinching your jubblies. This adjustment is completely independent of the adjustment for the distance from the leg pads to the rigging plates, allowing you to ride the leg pads low but also snug on the thighs. This is similar to the MB's extra strap on the leg pads, but to me the Onyx's implementation is better and more comfy. There is also the additional butt strap adjustment that keeps the back pad from riding up, so the back pad doesn't get above your hip bones (essential if comfort your goal). Once you get both these adjustments properly setup the latest version of the Onyx is a real contender. You sissy's can also buy the optional leg pads for even more comfort?

I know the MB is the flavor of the month (for good reason), but there are 3 saddles I personally feel are as comfy or even more comfy. In no particular order-
TreeMo S.Light
Onyx
TreeAustria 3.2.
 
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#10
I'm not quite sure how I feel about a webbing bridge like the TreeAustria has. The Glide is the only saddle I've ever worked in, so I would like to stick with a rope bridge.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#11
I'm not quite sure how I feel about a webbing bridge like the TreeAustria has. The Glide is the only saddle I've ever worked in, so I would like to stick with a rope bridge.
Not sure why the web bridge would be a concern. I know the TA 3.2 isn't talked about much these days, but I usually grab it before I grab my MB. Just saying?
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#12
If you are a thin guy, the TM might be a good option. It really is a saddle that molds to your body.
What Swing said. I too am a skinny climber and the TreeMo light fits me like no other. It conforms to your hips/pelvis in a way no other saddle can accomplish.
 
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#13
Okay. That's all really helpful. Thanks guys. Next question: I know there are different buckles on the S. Light, the big back pad is not stock on the s. Light, and the ring in the back is not rated for life support, but are there any other differences between the standard TM and the S. Light that I wouldn't know of? I tried each on for about 60 seconds each, and it seemed like there might have been more adjustability in the standard just because of the nature of the buckles?
 

evo

Well-Known Member
#14
the rope bridge thing is pretty new.. Webbing has always been bomb proof, while some rope bridges failed. Not saying anything against rope bridges other than some folks/manufacture's had a learning curve.
I agree the TA seems like a great ride, I have the older one 3.1 (?) . and it has it's plus sides over TM's.. I sat in the ONYX and the TM when I was shopping. I spent a whopping 2 minutes pulling on straps, the TM fit like a glove, the ONYX I couldn't get to the point of seeing the potential.
However I'm considering going the rigging plate route which would be New Tribe.. or slap some plates on the ole tree austria.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
#15
Okay. That's all really helpful. Thanks guys. Next question: I know there are different buckles on the S. Light, the big back pad is not stock on the s. Light, and the ring in the back is not rated for life support, but are there any other differences between the standard TM and the S. Light that I wouldn't know of? I tried each on for about 60 seconds each, and it seemed like there might have been more adjustability in the standard just because of the nature of the buckles?
not that I can see... I have both.. The Light is a back up/rescue ride.. The buckles on the non light version are a EPIC pain in the ass to adjust, think marlin spike and pliers.
I know a few ladies who bought the light and wish they went with the buckle version due to wider hips.
I ride my leg pads loose, so I some times just step in and out of them. My waste buckle changes due to layers I'm wearing, and ride that adjustment fairly tight.
One gripe, is the bridge riser adjustment slips all the time on mine, pisses me off to no end.

You're still ahead $ wise on a light with thicker padding than the non light version.
The only new consideration is the NEW version of the TM with a double bridge and hip dee redesign.. Don't know if they are making a light version of that?
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
#16
Evo if you mean the hip to lower D adjustment slipping. Find the sweet spot and sew a webbing stopper. It will never move again. That is the first thing I do. I cut the webbing and sew the loop in sweet spot. But I have access to a commercial sewing machine. A webbing stopper will work just as good. My saddle always gets all excess webbing cut off. And new loops sewn. I like you love loose leg loops.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#18
For me the TM Light was far superior to the regular TM. Being able to adjust the waist on the fly is a huge advantage of the Light. I also feel like the lighter material and backpad on the Light comforms to the hips much better than the regular. I find the lack of buckles on the leg pads to be a non issue. I too run them very loose, and once setup, sew them in place. The TM Light seems to disappear unlike any other saddle have ever flown, and sometimes I truly forget it is there. To me one of the greatest compliments I can give a saddle.
 
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