Tree Risk Management @ KEW Article

mrtree

Well-Known Member
There is a very interesting article in the 2015 Yearbook of the International Dendrology Society concerning tree risk management. IDS is an organization that brings together dendrologists (their term not mine) from all over the world to promote the study of woody plants and shrubs and to conserve and protect those that are rare and endangered.

The article is a very nice introduction from a interested amateur and describes a workshop at KEW lead by Tony Kirkham. Very worthwhile read, find out home many hours Kirkham was interviewed and was on the stand after one person was killed.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
A very familiar case. I saw that tree earlier in July 2012. It and a few others had very overextended branches. Sudden Branch Drop keeps getting cited, sounding like Act of God.

I think "Overextended" wass not considered a 'defect' in A300 Part 9; one of many lost battles with that committee in trying to broaden their scope.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
that's just ignorant at best... pretty darn obvious to those that make a living with a chainsaw!
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
Maybe Daniel means that overextended branches are such an obvious risk factor that they should not be ignored.

Mycophobia rules TRA, so other factors get little attention.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
6 hours interviewing does not sound excruciating; i've had depositions that long. And consider the author's perspective.
 

mrtree

Well-Known Member
Daniel how exactly do you know what caused the failure when you have never seen the tree, the two pages have virtually no info and I bet you have never read the coroner's report or info from people such as Jeremy Barrell? Tony Kirkham is one of the world's preeminent arboriculturalists has managed the tree for decades and he was not able to prevent it, further tree workers and arborists in the UK are in general fare more qualified than the US? Certainly a chainsaw does not qualify you for anything beyond chainsaw operation.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
Gravity caused the failure. Too much load and lever arm for the strength of the wood.

Using a saw in a tree gives one a valuable perspective that terrestrial types will never know.

We agree that no one expects every tree manager to prevent every tree failure. I've learned a lot from folks in the UK--Green, Fay, Humphries etc. but they don't know it all. They do know that fungi are nothing to fear; that puts them ahead of many 'authorities' in the US.
 
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