Tree check sonic decay detector...

JoshR

Active Member
#21
Correct and I think that chart is provided... the subjectivity comes in when the Arborist interprets the reading. I'm not an accountant I don't interpret numbers but more how it looks, feels and sounds. Which of course is subjective in its own ways, but I'm also not selling decay detection either.
If anyone has used or sat through a class about sonic tomography they will know the more points the better and even then the most minor defect can make a tree look worse than it is. I just think 2 points just isn't enough to map a defect adequately.
I've never taken a tomography class, which could be very interesting, but, what if you were to take 4 or more points to give yourself a better picture of the shape of the decay? Obviously it would be more holes in the bark but are they big enough to allow pathogens of some sort to enter through? If so, could wound dressing prevent it? I don't know, that's why I ask.
But I'm wondering about getting this thing and testing the numbers against what's actually in the wood when it comes down.
 
#22
I've never taken a tomography class, which could be very interesting, but, what if you were to take 4 or more points to give yourself a better picture of the shape of the decay? Obviously it would be more holes in the bark but are they big enough to allow pathogens of some sort to enter through? If so, could wound dressing prevent it? I don't know, that's why I ask.
But I'm wondering about getting this thing and testing the numbers against what's actually in the wood when it comes down.
When I sat through the class at ISA a couple years ago the instructor/inventor gave information about interpreting the digital map provided by the system an programming. A internal crack, frost crack, ring shake etc can all effect the sound travel. The more points the better the accuracy because all the data was accumulated into the "map". Like I said I think it's going to be great for pre climbs but it's not going to map out cavities like the other products on the market (of course significantly more expensive). I wouldn't feel right telling a client it took .x seconds for the sound to travel... next question what's that mean... means there is the possibility of decay. How much? We need more testing! Sorry I'm skeptical.
 

cerviarborist

Well-Known Member
#23
If it has a cavity deep inside, it's likely not much of a problem. It's the shell wall thickness that supports the mass of the tree, not the heartwood. As a rule, If you don't hear a hollow, you don't hear an issue worthy of an advanced assessment either.
 
#24
If it has a cavity deep inside, it's likely not much of a problem. It's the shell wall thickness that supports the mass of the tree, not the heartwood. As a rule, If you don't hear a hollow, you don't hear an issue worthy of an advanced assessment either.
Exactly! The reason a mallet is such a valuable tool. When worthy of an advanced assessment I want to provide more in depth information to the client such as mapping the cavity and strength loss information to be able to better make a decision. From the information provided about the product a mallet and tree check give you the same end result information... "yup there's a hollow there" or "nope it's solid" but no indication of size, retained strength or loss.
 
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