Tree-age

Alex

Member
Is anybody treating ash trees for EAB with Tree-age and Arborjet's Tree IV? I've done a few so far and wanted to discuss an issue with someone who's tried it out. Thanks, Alex
 

treebear

Member
We still do not have EAB in Europe but I´m a bit curious about how you approach the pest in USA. You specifically mentioned an application method and a pesticide. Is this pesticide systemic or contact based? How do this pesticide affect possible predators if there are any present. Is this a pre or post treatment and did it do the trick?
Is there to your knowledge any biological controls for EAB on the market?
Cheers
Svein
 

Woodland

Member
We have just started using Tree-age, as it has just been released within the past month .. had to update our equipment a bit even though we were already using the Arbor-jet system (especially since having some problems with our equipement that would require sending it back to the comanay AGAIN!!! - for the 3rd time). Anything you would want to discuss though, would have to pass along to our technichian... We are still on the fence as to if the size of the holes required in the trunk of the tree, & in regards to the information in, and comparison to proven Imidacloprid results. Wondering if it really is going to prove to be the best answer.... BUT the product has had SOOO much hype that we have clients that are really requesting it. We are NOT pushing the product at this point though. There is a really good article in the May 2008, "Landsculptor" Magizine, by Dr. Dave Roberts of MSU on the Tree-age hype. The magaize is put out by the MGIA. I would suggest anyone in the EAB area to read the article.

As to what has worked... soil applications to smaller
Ash with Immidicloprid, and trunk injections with the same, (we like to combine the soil with a fertilzer), at an every other year basis, after the first two years, has seemed to prove quite effective.
 

Alex

Member
Svein,
Good questions. There are a few different insecticides that have been used to treat for EAB. Recently a chemical called Emamectin Benzoate ("Em-Ben" for short) was approved for a few areas where EAB is present. Syngenta holds the patent on this formulation (trunk-injected suspension, I think) of Em-Ben and markets it under the label name "Tree-age"). Em-Ben has been used in the past for other agricultural applications, but not for the residential tree work industry as far as I understand. Recent research conducted by Dr. Deborah McCullough at Michigan State University has shown that Em-Ben wiped out almost all borers that encountered it in the tree (100% of borers that fed on leaves and 99% of borers within the trunk/branches). It's a systemic insecticide that is injected into the trunk at the base. The Arborjet system is used to apply it. Tree-age is kind of a joint-exclusive baby of both Arborjet and Syngenta. It also costs a small fortune to purchase one liter, probably because of this exclusivity and the price leveraging that patent-holding pharmaceuticals can work because of a product's demand. The catch is that despite its efficacy, a tree with enough damage to its vascular system might not get good distribution of the product. Even though it's early-on in Em-Ben's rookie season, I like what it has done in research trials compared to other products. As far as your question about predators affected I just read in a recent tree industry publication that woodpeckers probably won't go after dead larvae. About biological controls, there have been a number of parasites of EAB identified in China and some have been brought back to America where research is being conducted. There's good stuff going on, but everyday I see many ash trees in mid-Michigan that are past the point of any treatment possibilities. Alex
 

Alex

Member
Woodland,
I have a question for you or your technician applying Tree-age. What are the smallest diameter trees that your company has treated so far, and how fast/slow was the uptake? I treated some smaller, healthy trees (8-9") a couple weeks ago and weather conditions seemed ideal for good transpiration and I was careful to set the plugs at the correct depth, but it took over 3 hours for the product to get into these trees. I had to come back a second day to finish what should have been a half-day job. Yesterday I treated a 15" tree and it took it up in about 5 minutes. Just wondering if small trees have too small of an area of active sapwood for those "arborplugs" for the product to be taken up efficiently. I'm bidding a job for a property with more trees on the smaller end but don't want to get stuck spending 3 days doing what should be a half-day job. Alex
 

Woodland

Member
Talked to our top Arborist, and unless the Ash is showing signs of being affected (beyond minimally), we don't recommend doing anything besides a Merit/ArborGreen soil injection until the tree is about 12" and above. Between the time to take up, the possible un-necessary tree damage with the Tree-age, and such. That is our "rule of thumb" at this point in the game.
 

treegazer

Member
We are running a test with EB (Emamectin benzoate) to control horned oak gall.
I tried using the Tree IV from Arbor Jet with the high volume rate first and was unsuccessful due to equipment failure. I went ahead and used the QuickJet from ArborJet and had much better (faster) results.
I have never really liked the Tree IV. too many tubes and parts and clogged needles. The QuiickJet is nice because you just fill the bottle, set the dosage on the application needle and keep track of your total dosage as you apply. So much faster. You just have to be careful not to push to much chemical into the tree to fast. On higher volumes I had to go around the tree several times to allow time for the material to move into the tree.
I would not inject a tree under 6 inches. Using a trunk spray of Safari w/ PentraBark or a soil drench of imidicloprid would be the way to go on smaller trees.
And of course Read and follow the label.
 
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