Training New Employees

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
Does anyone have a collection of training videos and course packages they have collected to train new employees? We, a two man business/partnership, don't have any employees currently, so we don't have any program set up. But I am interested in how other small companies handle new hires. Someday we would like to, perhaps, not do all the work ourselves and maybe hire a few people. :berrinche:

I have done lots of training, but would like to collect, particularly in safety, training videos and courses that I could have on hand.

I am aware of what ISA and TCIA offer, but I was curious what others have put together. Obviously the in person training will be more beneficial, but I want something of a primer that the new hires can watch to get them started. What do you do?
 

tex-moto

Member
I don’t know about how he’d feel about you using it but maybe for a fee he’d be willing to have it licensed to use copies but the Shultz Effect is a lot of great climbing intro video.
 

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
I don’t know about how he’d feel about you using it but maybe for a fee he’d be willing to have it licensed to use copies but the Shultz Effect is a lot of great climbing intro video.
I actually haven't watched that myself. I have heard a lot about it though. Mostly, I am looking for just getting them safety minded on the job site, not particularly climbing yet. But I should look at the shultz effect anyways.


Comm helmets are a must for training imo
Absolutely! Another great reason to have them.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
Arbormaster had a series that i remember from the school daze. They were old tho. With Rip and Ken?
Too bad you cant build situational awareness from a video...only situations! The real time coaching by sena helmets is so clutch. You can explain as you work, instead of taking breaks whenever they start looking totally dumbfounded, which is anytime they have to change tasks.
You mean we have to move the truck to the next tree when we finish chipping this one?!?!
 

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
Arbormaster had a series that i remember from the school daze. They were old tho. With Rip and Ken?
Too bad you cant build situational awareness from a video...only situations! The real time coaching by sena helmets is so clutch. You can explain as you work, instead of taking breaks whenever they start looking totally dumbfounded, which is anytime they have to change tasks.
You mean we have to move the truck to the next tree when we finish chipping this one?!?!
I watched those videos! And absolutely the on site training will be the best method. I am looking for some supplementary material.
 

BEH2202

Member
I am a contract climber and trainer. I have recently been working with a company developing there new hire training program. So to answer the original question about training videos, I am not aware of any that would really do a comprehensive job, so what I do is use videos as visual aids and ways to get the conversation focused. I teach some of the TCIA courses, so EHAP and Aerial rescue have videos that come with them. I also use stuff off of Tree Buzz, and Youtube. As far as really training a new person it really requires a hands on approach and time. Ill give you a brief synopsis of what we came up with for the framework of new hire training within the first 2-3 weeks.
Assuming that you have already initially screened candidates for attitude, aptitude, and your desired skill set. We start with a working interview of sorts to see what the person knows and whether it fits with what they claimed to know. Depending upon what job this person was a applying for would determine the nature of the tasks that would be assigned to him. If he was a climber I would ask to inspect his equipment, have him set up his go to climbing system, and maybe do a run through ascent. After this you send them home with some resources that they will be expected to have gone over before their first day. For a new person I recommend "The Tree Climbers Companion" this gives them a way to prepare for their first day on the job and gives them some background so that they are not completely in the dark when they show up. For a more experienced climber I may assign sections of the z133 or part of the in house training manual. On their first day they start what I call induction training. Here are some of the things we identified as being critical training topics for the first 2 weeks on the job.
Trailer hook up/Spotting
Truck startup
Assist in job site set up
Identification of common equipment
Send climber equipment
Chipper startup
Untie rigged pieces
Coil Ropes
Deploy and stow gear
Chipper maintenance
Chipper feeding
Participate in site hazard assessment
Participate in site set up
Cone and signage deployment
Basic knots
Execute directed and supervised tasks
Clean up
Participate in job briefing
Secure loads to be transported
PPE use
Emergency response procedures
Communications procedures
Fire protection
Hydraulic leak safety
Assist drivers in backing trailers
Lock out tag out
Proper lifting
Environmental safety
Slips trips falls
Drop Zone Safety

This list was tailored for a specific client, but I think it applies broadly. Is there anything you guys would add? Anything that you would remove?
Anyway I hope this is somewhat helpful.
 

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
I am a contract climber and trainer. I have recently been working with a company developing there new hire training program. So to answer the original question about training videos, I am not aware of any that would really do a comprehensive job, so what I do is use videos as visual aids and ways to get the conversation focused. I teach some of the TCIA courses, so EHAP and Aerial rescue have videos that come with them. I also use stuff off of Tree Buzz, and Youtube. As far as really training a new person it really requires a hands on approach and time. Ill give you a brief synopsis of what we came up with for the framework of new hire training within the first 2-3 weeks.
Assuming that you have already initially screened candidates for attitude, aptitude, and your desired skill set. We start with a working interview of sorts to see what the person knows and whether it fits with what they claimed to know. Depending upon what job this person was a applying for would determine the nature of the tasks that would be assigned to him. If he was a climber I would ask to inspect his equipment, have him set up his go to climbing system, and maybe do a run through ascent. After this you send them home with some resources that they will be expected to have gone over before their first day. For a new person I recommend "The Tree Climbers Companion" this gives them a way to prepare for their first day on the job and gives them some background so that they are not completely in the dark when they show up. For a more experienced climber I may assign sections of the z133 or part of the in house training manual. On their first day they start what I call induction training. Here are some of the things we identified as being critical training topics for the first 2 weeks on the job.
Trailer hook up/Spotting
Truck startup
Assist in job site set up
Identification of common equipment
Send climber equipment
Chipper startup
Untie rigged pieces
Coil Ropes
Deploy and stow gear
Chipper maintenance
Chipper feeding
Participate in site hazard assessment
Participate in site set up
Cone and signage deployment
Basic knots
Execute directed and supervised tasks
Clean up
Participate in job briefing
Secure loads to be transported
PPE use
Emergency response procedures
Communications procedures
Fire protection
Hydraulic leak safety
Assist drivers in backing trailers
Lock out tag out
Proper lifting
Environmental safety
Slips trips falls
Drop Zone Safety

This list was tailored for a specific client, but I think it applies broadly. Is there anything you guys would add? Anything that you would remove?
Anyway I hope this is somewhat helpful.
WOW, That is a very full answer. Thank you for spending your time sharing that. Seems like a pretty comprehensive list. I might add a section on Chipper safety, but you do cover that in the various chipper items you have listed above. I just see the chipper as the biggest item a new hire would be using that has the most chance of killing them. Also, I don't know how new to the industry we are talking, but Chainsaw safety etc.. I love your list thanks for sharing!
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
Yes, great list. I have been helping to train a new employee that is coming from the challenge element, tower building/zipline industry. He is really sharp and learns fast, but comprehensive lists would definately help us cover things that might be overlooked because tree work is so unique and each company has different needs.
The fist item in that list above is trailer hook ups and spotting, which reminded me, after several days so far, our newest hire isnt proactive in assisting drivers b/c he hasnt been asked to yet...
 
A lot of TCIA materials lack luster in my opinion, especially for what they cost. However, I think some of the Tree Care Academy workbooks have a pretty comprehensive coverage of information for inexperienced tree workers. In my opinion, skip Tree Care Apprentice workbook and start with Ground Operations Specialist workbook for green hires. Tree Climber Specialist is maybe more basic than specialist, but still a good, thorough coverage of general concepts for new climbers. They are relatively expensive, but training is a good investment.
 

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
What is meant by your sarcasm?
It's all good.. Sarcasm and I never fair well , especially on a keyboard... just the way I read your post maybe my dyslexia kicked in and well I thought it was funny?
Earn your ctsp and be enlightened by the psychology that goes into proper effective on job training.
So the ctsp will enlighten who by the psychology that goes into proper effective on job training? You as ctsp will obtain enlightenment to effectively train or the greenie who you want train to obtain thier ctsp with ctsp will obtain it .. enlightenment that is.. :loco: I'm loose , enlightenment sounds great got some to share with me
 

BEH2202

Member
WOW, That is a very full answer. Thank you for spending your time sharing that. Seems like a pretty comprehensive list. I might add a section on Chipper safety, but you do cover that in the various chipper items you have listed above. I just see the chipper as the biggest item a new hire would be using that has the most chance of killing them. Also, I don't know how new to the industry we are talking, but Chainsaw safety etc.. I love your list thanks for sharing!
This list encompasses what my client is referring to as "Boot Camp". This training evolution is only intended to last two weeks. When I copied and pasted the list I missed two items, fueling equipment, and doing a vehicle inspections. Chipper operations are covered, but actually using a chainsaw has been left till the candidate has progressed to the next level of training. So, the training program is broken down into Boot Camp, Groundsman 1, 2, 3, Climber trainee, Climber 1, 2, 3, and Crew leader. Each training evolution has its own list of competencies. Now within the Boot Camp evolution they may use the Chipper operator class as a way to augment their own on the job training. So, part of the reason that I like using the tree care academy courses is that it makes it easy to document training and become compliant with OSHA without reinventing the wheel so to speak. It is a tool to be used in conjunction with your own in house training, not a fire and forget solution. At the end of the day the employer is responsible for making sure that his or her employees are trained properly.

Yes, great list. I have been helping to train a new employee that is coming from the challenge element, tower building/zipline industry. He is really sharp and learns fast, but comprehensive lists would definately help us cover things that might be overlooked because tree work is so unique and each company has different needs.
The fist item in that list above is trailer hook ups and spotting, which reminded me, after several days so far, our newest hire isnt proactive in assisting drivers b/c he hasnt been asked to yet...
Tree work is very unique, so when I train I am not trying to train standards and rules, I'm training a way of thinking. Not that rules and standards aren't a good thing, but I want to train people to think for themselves and take personal responsibility for their safety and that of those that they work with as well. You just can't train for every scenario that could present itself out there, so you need people who are able to think on the fly and make good judgement calls.
 
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