Throw line

Acerxharlowii

Active Member
It’s interesting that I have t seen any threads dedicated to throwlines. I’ve gone through a few myself. Right now I’m using the petzl. So far so alright. It did tangle on the way up and I’m not to happy about that. Maybe because it was brand new?
Anyways, what are people’s favorite throwline?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Thowlines sure have improved since the mini-water ski cord, Slickline. AS they've gotten smaller in diameter their performance has sky rocketed.

Some of the alleged short-comings of the new t-lines are more a handling and prep issue though.

Marv taught me, with three strand hemp rope, to first layout the new rope in loose coils. Find a line of trees or posts or something about ten feet apart...6 or 7 of them. Then thread the line between the posts/trees. go end to end a few times. Everytime the line goes around a turn the spirals from factory coiling get milked out. Now tie off one end. take the other end and tie it off under tension. Let it sit for 10-15 minutes. This will stiffen the fibers like they do when making lariats.

Now...never coil! Flake into some container. I'm such a huge fan of the Flateimer cube or a copy.

If I haven't used the t-line for a while I will, at a minimum toss the t-lineover one low limb then re-flake it into the Cube. If I don't it's an invite to the Interdimensional Creature to reach into our dimension and snarl it into such a bird's nest!

There have been many climbers over the years that didn't like the t-line they bought. After sharing what I learned from Marv 40 years ago most of the issues are solved.
 

Jan_

Active Member
I haven't tested a lot of throwlines, but I am now on my 4th Petzl(edit: Edelrid, was not fully awake yet lol)line. I prefer the yellow, thick line over the red, skinny line, I think it tangles less. I once ordered some "Marlow" throwline from Amazon, I could not get that to come down over the slippiest of branches.
 
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climbingmonkey24

Active Member
I’ve got parts of throw lines lost up in trees in my backyard from earlier days in my climbing career when I used to do a lot of climbing at home for practice or recreational lol.

The first throw line I ever bought was on Amazon, it was yellow, I think it was by Weaver. It was a little thicker.

Now I’m using an orange one that’s thinner. Forgot who it is made by. Got it on TreeStuff.
 
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Keeth

Active Member
Dynaglide.

I know a lot of guys that like Zing-it. It is strong, but tangles more easily than anything I’ve encountered after getting a little age on it.

We ordered a spool of Notch Acculine to equip some of our Disaster Response Vehicles, but the jury is still out on its overall performance.

Regardless of brand, I have found it is very important to stretch and set it when new to get the best performance.
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
The first throw line I ever bought was on Amazon, it was yellow, I think it was by Weaver. It was a little thicker.

Now I’m using an orange one that’s thinner. Forgot who it is made by. Got it on TreeStuff.
That sums up what I did exactly, except I know what I bought. I had the Weaver set with a 16 oz. ball from amazon, and I actually really like the line, doesn’t tangle much, and glides reasonably well. Now I'm using orange Dynaglide, not very broken in yet, but like it so far.
 

Jan_

Active Member
How much of a difference in height do the different throwlines make? I have not felt any real difference on 2.2mm polyester vs. 2.8mm polyester.
 

Joeybagodonuts

Active Member
I
How much of a difference in height do the different throwlines make? I have not felt any real difference on 2.2mm polyester vs. 2.8mm polyester.
I'm not sure.. all i know is I've always sucked with throwing & dreaded the management of them line.. I had always had 1.8mm DB's.. until recently..
However, as soon as i switched to dynaglide & a lower weight bag, im knocking it out of the park.. This stuff is freaking awesome & i can actually grip it with my big ole bear paws..
Plus the fact it's splicable & u can get it dirt frigging cheap on eBay compared to the dot coms... i don't think I'll be using anything else soon..
 

Acerxharlowii

Active Member
I

I'm not sure.. all i know is I've always sucked with throwing & dreaded the management of them line.. I had always had 1.8mm DB's.. until recently..
However, as soon as i switched to dynaglide & a lower weight bag, im knocking it out of the park.. This stuff is freaking awesome & i can actually grip it with my big ole bear paws..
Plus the fact it's splicable & u can get it dirt frigging cheap on eBay compared to the dot coms... i don't think I'll be using anything else soon..
Are you using a 12oz?
 

*useless info*

Well-Known Member
i like and have worked Tom's suggestions, also in rope worked Prussics down length milking ropes etc. Especially on prep of new ropes/lines.
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i think the rope simply must twist/coil as especially coiling to compact storage; as equal on opposite reaction per turn taken(more than we think), and work to mechanically-compensate or in flaking allowing to auto-compensate.
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So fig.8 storage as counter-acting, flaking as automatic per pressures in line if hands don't dictate lay of line, but rather sense and allow rope itself to, or in coiling i prefer purposefully twisting the line between fingers with each turn of coil. In each csee the free end must be free length to end to allow Natural relief w/o back pressure as rope itself tries to relieve stresses/curls.
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This is most pronounced/dramatized/magnified to be able to see i think, in simple 1" flat rope/webbing like our loops are made of, and try to refer to for hammock etc in wrap_3/pull_2.
Start flat and go to coil nicely around arm, and the length more easily reveals it's secrets that each turn traps another turn into free length and in the flat profile leverages against release of the backpressure of turns. So can see in turns on arm/in air etc. are heading for disaster.
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So we give counter turns of 8's, flaking to let rope self equalize, but also back to neat coil for ropes twisting line between fingers with each draw to coil, if end free to play out. Sometimes making large arc with feeding end and whip some twist out, but doable. Then save some for turns around coil, feed bight up under top of coil and end backhand /muenter thru with tail binds, some slipped daisy chain and end lock (keeper) for handle(gasket hitch in total i believe) as my other option to flaking. i can flake throwline into short army ammo can well enough, climbing line into canvas bag. But sometimes like the flatter profile having behind seat for utility , rig lines, or on wall etc.
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Throwline in a pinch, have used mechanics rag loaded with dirt on paracord. you want soft, not hard bouncy weight.
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A fave heavier rigging use for throw line is to get Round Turn(RT) around high support , with carabiner and pull line to pull the lower turn open for less friction, sweating load tight, retrieving rig line. For heavier wood, and high support don't want to climb up to. Can do as climber more locally with RT on support and sling and carabiner set as pull handle. Can be real game changer. Lowers loading on support, as control leg much less pull. Hard sweat thru carabiner to tighten load, ground control grabbing purchases, and climber working rope part before fractions to tweak tight. Can be too much, were can't receive to proper during usage, but when that isn't a problem, this is real good trick!
 
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