Thoughts on Stihl (or other!) "2-in-1" sharpener / rake-grinder units?

eyehearttrees

New Member
I've never used anything besides regular files for teeth & rakes but after watching a youtube where Reg Coates gives glowing endorsement for the Stihl model (as does Steve of Steve's Small Engine Saloon), was checking price and it seems there's generic units as well - would love to hear thoughts on the 2-in-1 in general, and especially if anyone's got experience with / heard about the non-stihl / unbranded units (half the price, max, on amazon & ebay as the Stihl unit...stihl makes good stuff for sure but they are so damn expensive, I know you get what you pay for in many cases but stihl is nicer than I need in most cases!!)
 

Scratch

Active Member
I'm not a pro, but I cut about 15 cords a year for firewood so take this for what it's worth...
I use to pull my chain and resharpen with a dedicated electric shrapener. It was nice and I just kept a bunch of chains ready to go. Last year I decided to try one of those 2 in 1's so I got the Pferd. I always seemed to forget to sharpen the dull chains at home so I like this one as it forces me to do it right then. It takes me about 2 minutes to sharpen my 20" bar with one.

I can't see a difference between the Pferd and the Stihl besides the color.

I flip the bar each time I sharpen so it does take longer than swapping chains like I used to but since I got the Pferd, I haven't used my electric sharpener. It seems I can get them as sharp as I could with the grinder.

Curious to hear the pro's thoughts on them...
 
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TreeCo

Well-Known Member
The 'two in ones' are not progressive depth gage filers. They are fixed depth gage filers.

As cutting teeth get shorter the depth gage setting needs to be increased to maintain optimum cutting.

The two in ones also don't work on skip and half skip chains.

I have three sizes of the original Pferds.
They work OK.
 
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evo

Well-Known Member
I love the one I got for the one saw I run a full comp on... Sucks that they won't work on skip chains.
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
I have Stihl one and it works very well.

I think a regular file and flat file are still needed from time to time, especially as the chain ages. It's sometimes nice to control how much is taken off the depth gauge for a larger bite in softer woods.
 
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Naturarbo

New Member
we got all of them for all our saws,works great,impossible to not like it,both teeth in 1 go???cant beat it
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
I definitely like Pferd files better than Stilh. Not that Stihl are bad...Pferd are better.

I used to suck at hand sharpening. Tried every gadget I could find and still sucked. With lots of practice became proficient with regular file.

I've now gone back to the 2 in 1 and like it for touch ups. I still use the bench sharpener if the chain got a rock or wire cage that someone was too lazy to remove...
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I definitely like Pferd files better than Stilh. Not that Stihl are bad...Pferd are better.

I used to suck at hand sharpening. Tried every gadget I could find and still sucked. With lots of practice became proficient with regular file.

I've now gone back to the 2 in 1 and like it for touch ups. I still use the bench sharpener if the chain got a rock or wire cage that someone was too lazy to remove...
I thought they were the same just rebranded. Files that is.. The blue 2 in 1 and white and orange are certainly identical rebrands
 

hseII

Well-Known Member
I thought they were the same just rebranded. Files that is.. The blue 2 in 1 and white and orange are certainly identical rebrands
They are the same thing.

I’ve got 1 for TH saws & 1 for .404”.

Both of mine are Blue.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
As cutting teeth get shorter the depth gage setting needs to be increased to maintain optimum cutting.
I thought the alignment rails rode on top of the adjacent teeth on either side of the tooth/gauge being filed, so that as those teeth became shorter, the depth gauge would also follow it down, leading to a fixed vertical relationship between the top of the depth gauge and cutting edge of the associated tooth...?

In other words, it seems like even as the teeth become shorter, the depth gauges would track along consistently.

This is new to me: are you saying that in order to maintain optimum cutting ability, the vertical component of the distance between top of the depth gauge and the cutting edge needs to actually be increased as the tooth shortens? That is, depth gauge top to cutting edge height difference is 'X'mm when brand new, but needs to be increased to 'X+Y'mm after the chain has been filed down substantially?
 
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Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
@LordFarkwad

You’re right.

I haven’t used one of the newer tandem units so I’m not sure how they index for depth gauge removal

With the original...one round one flat file...the rails set the depth
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
This is the guy I'm talking about. I work two of them (for 3/8" and 3/8"P), but also, I don't know crap about chains/chainsaws. I do know I love zipping through sharpening a 36" full comp chain in 6 or 7min. Makes me much more likely - on any saw, no matter bar length - to touch up after every tank, or every other tank of gas than if I had to break out magnifying glass and files.

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Is progressively increasing the depth-gauge-to-cutter-top-height a real thing? Stated another way, I'm asking if changing the angle between the depth gauge and cutter is something that is actually needed and done as a chain wears.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Holders may be the same. To go buy a pack of Pferd files and a pack of Stihl files...they are different. A few years ago I tried out both...went back and forth on different chains and saws back to back side-by-side, etc... and decided the Pferd files were better files. While actually filing, I was thinking Stihl was doing a better job cutting the teeth...but the Pferd filed chains consistently cut better. In my experience...
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
I thought the alignment rails rode on top of the adjacent teeth on either side of the tooth/gauge being filed, so that as those teeth became shorter, the depth gauge would also follow it down, leading to a fixed vertical relationship between the top of the depth gauge and cutting edge of the associated tooth...?

In other words, it seems like even as the teeth become shorter, the depth gauges would track along consistently.
I agree.

But as the tooth gets filed back the depth gauge should become progressively shorter. In other words what starts out as .025" increases to 0.30, .035 or even more when at the back of the tooth. If the depth gauge is not lowered progressively then the chain takes a smaller and smaller chip. It is about the tooth face angle of attack into the wood

Obviously this fact is not understood by many but the information is out there if you look. There have been many discussions at Arboristsite over the years in the chainsaw forum.

Any of you guys square filing saw chain?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
IF you look closely at how the guide rails work you'll see that the Pferd engineers solved the issue of depth gauges changing. Look at where the rails index. as those teetch get shorter the guage drops down.

When the Pferd unit first came out I saw Tim Ard do a demo. He'd left one side of the chain stock and ground off about half the tooth on the other side. Most of the people in the group looked and thought that it would cut a curve. NOT SO! Since each side was cutting off the same thickness at each tooth it cut straight.

@TreeCo either we're talking about two different things or you don't understand how the Pferd works. When I was cutting full time I sharpened many loops of chain from off the spool to the scrap bucket with ONLY the Pferd units.

I could teach an attentive person how to sharpen a chain using the Pferd and get a reasonably decent chain. The learning curve was flat...easy. Showing old hands how to use the Pferd always lead to smiles too. Easy and sharp!
 

LordFarkwad

Well-Known Member
When the Pferd unit first came out I saw Tim Ard do a demo. He'd left one side of the chain stock and ground off about half the tooth on the other side. Most of the people in the group looked and thought that it would cut a curve. NOT SO! Since each side was cutting off the same thickness at each tooth it cut straight.
That's pretty incredible, too. I'd think intuitively that each cutter-gauge pair would need to be at a similar height to other cutter-gauge pairs, to get even left-right cutting. Otherwise there'd be a disparity in the amount of wood being presented to each cutter-gauge pair.

The result of that demo seems to imply that there must be a fair amount of jostling around (in the vertical plane) of each cutter-gauge pair as it travels through the wood, nullifying the effect of height differences. Is this the case?
 
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