this is what happens when you tip tie a large vertical limb

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
#68
It's well known from others posts which I agree this fella needs a mentor . I watched a couple cuts before I got fed up and shut it off .. the face cuts seem to deep most times, the snap cuts looked ass backwards, maybe that's camera trick eye shit ..what the hell do i know..only been out there in a tree half my life never once took a glancing blow to the head , got cut with a chainsaw, fell out of a tree or fucked anyone or myself up. I did see a pfanner man fails vid today and that looks more like the shit i go through. Knock on ducking wood!
 

Stihlmadd

Well-Known Member
#69
Ben it appears to me the quote from Sgt Hartmann was made for this guy. LMAO
My spider sense has some serious tingling watching this fella work.
not that as a person I have a problem with - he comes across as a fairly genuine Human :)
but charm alone won't sway the reaper.....

as to guts being enough ,
even Sgt Hartman can't be right all the time.
I x2 the need for some mentoring whether in the canopy or on the ground .
 
#72
He probably used up all his luck, because shortly thereafter he broke his pelvis:
Man. I don’t know if this dude is on the Buzz or not, but my heart goes out to him. I did almost the same crap, just broke different bones. TIP broke after successful test, fell 25’. So all that was chilling in familiarity.
Luckily Dude is built like a champion! So recovery should go well.
 

SomethingWitty

Well-Known Member
#74
He has recovered and is already back to doing stupid stuff
That's how you know it's not an act.
He could have died (Not like usual; people with no idea know that falling kills you), got lucky and didn't, and is right back at it. I'm wishing him luck. The showmanship is great, even if the work is sketchy.
 
#76
We may have a issue with definitions, but I disagree with a lot of the above.. generally its just faster easier to use gravity, rather than winching, which is almost never needed with a good rigging set up.
and to answer the question:
Before making cut ask yourself "if I do this will I die here?"

second question is "AM I sure?"
So Daniel -or others, could you share a few more details about how you might have handled this given situation (and not just avoided it by different earlier rigging)? Sounds as though you like the idea of a slash cut, but would you have still gone with such a large, tip-tied pick and just have the groundsman lower it more quickly or some other approach? (I've been in tree work about as long as "Human" but with a really great company. The physics of tip-tying is still a bit tricky for me, even though I taught college physics for 28 years before getting into tree work.)
 
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southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
#77
He gambled hope in his plan, and hope in his groundman to all go right, with the stakes being his life.

I'm not an All-in guy, especially with Sooooo much uncertainty.

Personally, the less I have to trust anyone else with my safety, the better!




Get a string, a branch, and a tiny hands saw. Make a model. This is going to help more than your armchair and strong brain power, or maybe I should say, will make a good complement to them.
 
#78
He gambled hope in his plan, and hope in his groundman to all go right, with the stakes being his life.

I'm not an All-in guy, especially with Sooooo much uncertainty.

Personally, the less I have to trust anyone else with my safety, the better!




Get a string, a branch, and a tiny hands saw. Make a model. This is going to help more than your armchair and strong brain power, or maybe I should say, will make a good complement to them.
Interesting idea using a model. I wonder if it would work well considering that real branches are so much heavier for the ground guys. And -- by the way -- I am in awe of the ability of my co-workers to do applied physics on the fly. Equations would be no match for these guys.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
#79
You might somehow limit your force, like connecting hand to string/ rope with a weak spring.

A branch could be 20' long, 'planted'/ jammed into the ground, simulating a tree.


A lack of understanding of vector forces seems rampant in the tree industry.
 
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