The Shultz Effect

DSMc

Well-Known Member
This is a great idea and a practical, affordable method for getting this type of information out and into the field where it can be accessed when needed.
I just tried to order this and had a little trouble getting paypal to work. Just me or anyone else?
 

cory

Well-Known Member
Hi Lawrence, imo, that was a great all around answer to Reg, good background on the genesis of your product. Thanks.
 

Pfanner man

Well-Known Member
This is a great idea and a practical, affordable method for getting this type of information out and into the field where it can be accessed when needed.
I just tried to order this and had a little trouble getting paypal to work. Just me or anyone else?
i don't wanna blame it on paypal but i had one other guy in France say paypal charged him twice, then they said it was my sight when it clearly wasn't, it got sorted but idk about that paypal o_O

i hope you were about to get it sorted out. feel free to e-mail theschultzeffect@gmail.com for any help, questions, comments, etc, etc
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
.....i hope you were about to get it sorted out......
Yes, got it, thanks! It was a problem with using my tablet for the purchase, not a problem with your site or Paypal. I used the wife's computer and no problems. I have only watched a few, but nicely done, clear and easily understood. Information in this form is exactly what has been needed and fills a big void.
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Haha! Nice video, Reg. I particularly liked all the emotional highs and lows but got a little concerned that you might be pushing yourself too hard with these productions. You are of that age where you need to start paying attention to the consequences of getting so worked up. Maybe Tai Chi? ;)
 

Pfanner man

Well-Known Member
You couldn't ask for a better review from a better guy!
i feel honored really. i've only met him a hand full of times and he's not even that into to SRT, so for him to go out of his way like that was really the motivation for me to get on the Buzz and start living up to some expectations and making myself available for interrogation :tanguero:
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
.... it is a pretty interesting exchange on that thread.
Thanks for posting that, Mark. I missed that thread and Reg's remarks on SRT vs DdRT and will wholeheartedly agree with his opinion on how and when to use each. Having finished watching all the rest of Lawrence's instructional videos and being happy to have that opportunity, very well done. My one criticism would be his effort to put DdRT on somewhat equal footing with SRT. For me as with Reg, DdRT has been relegated to a useful widget. It gets used only rarely.
 

Kris Anderson

Active Member
Just purchased today . I have had a hard time converting to SRT, or more accurately incorporating SRT into my day
. Can't wait to watch.
 
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Drumbo

Active Member
I feel the debate over SRT vs DdRT helps shed light on the many advantages of SRT over DdRT.

However there are still many uses for DdRT over SRT. It all comes down to the tree. If you live in an area and work with trees that aren't all that tall, or you can wreck a tree out on your ascent DdRT can still be the go to technique.

One thing Lawrence points out often in "the Effect" is that it is important to understand both techniques and know when to use them both depending on the tree. I completely agree with this philosophy.
 

Reg

Well-Known Member
This is perhaps the last sizable tree that I favored DdRT, and thought it the right choice there after. A removal.... for starters, which means spurs so ascending any didstance requiring little effort; open canopy with unimpeded line access between TIP and work position (no redirects); I was using the spiderjack with friction saver, so being a tall tree the tail of my line would fall through the device and self tend pretty much throughout the whole procedure - the spiderjack also gives you the ability to cinch up your line to a perfect amount of tension that you so desire.

On the whole, and what with the rigging almost mirroring the climbing system, it was so easy it almost didnt feel like work. And, on that occasion at least its hard to see how SRT would have given me any noticeable advantage....but, its been few and far between since to be honest. Pruning that tree, I wouldnt even entertain DdRT. Same as pruning the big conifers here.
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Pfanner man

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting that, Mark. I missed that thread and Reg's remarks on SRT vs DdRT and will wholeheartedly agree with his opinion on how and when to use each. Having finished watching all the rest of Lawrence's instructional videos and being happy to have that opportunity, very well done. My one criticism would be his effort to put DdRT on somewhat equal footing with SRT. For me as with Reg, DdRT has been relegated to a useful widget. It gets used only rarely.
with most things "it all comes down to the tree" as Drumbo said (spot on by the way). i wasn't trying to put DdRT on the same level as SRT, altho i'm sure it has come off that way at times, but definitely making sure not to promote it's elimination and more importantly, not ostracizing it and those who still hold it dear. there is always a time and place for both and very often a blend of both works best for me. the advantage of one over the other it certainly situational based. "it all comes down to the tree"
i do appreciate the criticism by the way. feel free to share more, that goes for everyone. i want to make the best product i can for the community and by sharing stuff i hope to learn as well.
 

123Craig

Active Member
There is always so much to learn, and my small brain can only take in so much at any one time; I'm on here every few days or so, always re-watching videos of Lawrence's and the endless plethora of amazing arborists here... then it's taking time to test techniques low and slow, then practice, practice, practice - till it becomes fluid - then the real moment of truth comes when you try to seamlessly incorporate it into the work site... To get very good takes a very, very long time. Respec, booyakasha!
 

Jem4417

Well-Known Member
Srt takes better conditioning and strength then doubled. Obviously the ascent is easier but moving around the tree without the 2:1 option makes you have to have a certain strength. Primarily grip for certain movements.
 

Pfanner man

Well-Known Member
Srt takes better conditioning and strength then doubled. Obviously the ascent is easier but moving around the tree without the 2:1 option makes you have to have a certain strength. Primarily grip for certain movements.
initially it certainly seems that way but your climbing style adapts and you begin climbing the actual tree more and using your body leverage different. you also start routing the tree differently and using more redirects to change the angle of your limb walks. setting up a quick 2:1 with SRT is also easy, even tho it feels like an extra step compared to it being built in with DdRT. I actually find that i'm more tired when i use DdRT all day (depending on the tree, task, etc, etc)
 

Leroy

Well-Known Member
This is perhaps the last sizable tree that I favored DdRT, and thought it the right choice there after. A removal.... for starters, which means spurs so ascending any didstance requiring little effort; open canopy with unimpeded line access between TIP and work position (no redirects); I was using the spiderjack with friction saver, so being a tall tree the tail of my line would fall through the device and self tend pretty much throughout the whole procedure - the spiderjack also gives you the ability to cinch up your line to a perfect amount of tension that you so desire.

On the whole, and what with the rigging almost mirroring the climbing system, it was so easy it almost didnt feel like work. And, on that occasion at least its hard to see how SRT would have given me any noticeable advantage....but, its been few and far between since to be honest. Pruning that tree, I wouldnt even entertain DdRT. Same as pruning the big conifers here.
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Reg, would it not have been easier to climb the rope to get to the limbs rather than spike climbing? Obviously, you are quite skilled at spiking up large trees, just curious.
 

Pfanner man

Well-Known Member
Reg, would it not have been easier to climb the rope to get to the limbs rather than spike climbing? Obviously, you are quite skilled at spiking up large trees, just curious.
perhaps with the rope against the trunk and having to put spikes on anyways he figured why bother?
 
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