Tapered Hinge: Diar(y)rhea of a thread gone wrong and left un-moderated

Use Tapered Hinge against Side Lean?

  • Huh?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Never

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hardly

    Votes: 1 3.7%
  • Sometimes

    Votes: 15 55.6%
  • Preferably

    Votes: 7 25.9%
  • Religiously

    Votes: 4 14.8%

  • Total voters
    27
  • Poll closed .

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
It is a workout but there is no rush, the day is long. With 60 year old legs I "change back a gear" and minimise wasted effort. The natural slope is 25 - 45 degrees and the last few days have been in the 40's deg C, (and there is some donkey cutting down all his shade).
Despite this, when I can get to them through the undergrowth and crap I average a tree about every 4 - 5 minutes for 11 hours a day. 1 hour off for lunch and replace the lost fluids with cold beers end of day.

You have honed in correctly "minimizing time" though cutting wasted time doesn't mean cutting corners. While I am scarfing (notching) a tree I am looking around planning hours ahead of myself. How you move your fuel ahead of the work, cutting bridged logs while you are there and observing future hazards, all adds up. The “alpine ash” bush is unforgiving. All this is done while coordinating with the machines sorting the mess I make below.

The flow of wood onto trucks is the result of great teamwork rather than any individual.

Placing wedges in every tree is as big a waste of time and effort as not putting one in when you need to. Knowing when to is the result of experience. If I knew how, I would put up some short clips of sliding trees down to the landing and other stuff but alas there isn’t a “pull start” on my computer. I had to work a few Sunday’s and not allowed to work alone so I took up an assistant who took some pics. I put 16 litres of fuel through the falling saw so there was a lot going on.
I get all of that Graeme and well said. Using wedges when not needed does equal the downtime of trying to fall a tree that you should've used them on and didn't. Well put. Moving fuel to where you'll need it next takes a lot of experience to get right too.
 
Where about a in Vic are you cutting Graeme??
Would give my left but to come spend a couple days watching or falling with someone of your ability
I'm just a faller in the central Highlands, nothing special. Quite a few others do the same job with Alpine ash.

You need a forest operator’s license to be in the bush and endorsed for whatever you are doing. I don't know if you are in the forest industry or where you are based. We are north of the divide copping the hot weather at the moment (Royston range near Rubicon).
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
It is a workout but there is no rush, the day is long. With 60 year old legs I "change back a gear" and minimise wasted effort. The natural slope is 25 - 45 degrees and the last few days have been in the 40's deg C, (and there is some donkey cutting down all his shade).
I had to work a few Sunday’s and not allowed to work alone so I took up an assistant who took some pics. I put 16 litres of fuel through the falling saw so there was a lot going on.
Sounds like boot camp... AMAZING physical fitness.... we should all chip in for a go pro for you!

And to clarify one earlier point.. The point I was making about no saw snatch was not related to heavy front leaners.. It was related to chunking out short straight pieces by cutting past the center of gravity with the face. This creates a VERY slight front lean... So slight that the weight of the saw would not allow the piece to fall into the face if the saw was still attached to piece during the back cut..
 

rico

Well-Known Member
And to clarify one earlier point.. The point I was making about no saw snatch was not related to heavy front leaners.. It was related to chunking out short straight pieces by cutting past the center of gravity with the face. This creates a VERY slight front lean... So slight that the weight of the saw would not allow the piece to fall into the face if the saw was still attached to piece during the back cut..
New flash Daniel. Folks have been making deep undercuts that go past the center of gravity since the dawn of time. A wonderful technique for getting vertical or slightly back-leaning logs to easily hit their lay without the use of a tagline or wedges. Again not recommended when working over valuables.

Why must you make a video in which you fuck up this wonderfully simply technique, and once again advocate potentially dangerous methods (bypassed undercut, cutting all your hinge,
possible saw snatch)? Why Daniel, Why?

 
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Sounds like boot camp... AMAZING physical fitness.... we should all chip in for a go pro for you!

And to clarify one earlier point.. The point I was making about no saw snatch was not related to heavy front leaners.. It was related to chunking out short straight pieces by cutting past the center of gravity with the face. This creates a VERY slight front lean... So slight that the weight of the saw would not allow the piece to fall into the face if the saw was still attached to piece during the back cut..
I don't feel fit during the hot days. I'm just happy getting to the next tree. I have a go pro but wouldn't take it to work unless there was a genuine reason. Showing only the falling doesn't demonstrate the team effort that it is. It might be regarded as poor form.

I'm a little uncomfortable putting up what I have already. I said it somewhere else, "if you need an audience to be a faller, you’re in the wrong job, it’s personal." Urban tree work appears almost the reverse these days. Extraverted climbers and camera's go together and that's OK because that's what it is.

I'm not reading back but I must have misunderstood saw snatch. I suppose there is a lesson there for writers and readers alike.
 

Scheffa

Active Member
I'm just a faller in the central Highlands, nothing special. Quite a few others do the same job with Alpine ash.

You need a forest operator’s license to be in the bush and endorsed for whatever you are doing. I don't know if you are in the forest industry or where you are based. We are north of the divide copping the hot weather at the moment (Royston range near Rubicon).
Based out of Mansfield doing mainly line clearance work and hazard trees, your not just a faller in the ash, one of the best tree workers in our state
 

evo

Well-Known Member
If anyone else is bored and snowed in google Murphy’s business page and reviews.. I wonder if there is a video of it in the works.

Now I mess up from time to time, this last one seems a doozy
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
here's an extreme example of cutting off your compression side.... didn't work here too well, but doesn't mean it couldn't.. guessing he's made work enough to show it here...

 

rico

Well-Known Member
here's an extreme example of cutting off your compression side.... didn't work here too well, but doesn't mean it couldn't.. guessing he's made work enough to show it here...

So it’s not enough that you continually post up vids/pics of your own unsafe, unreliable cutting practices? You now feel the need to show someone else’s subpar cutting? What if some youngster goes out and tries that cut on a tree that wants to bite him in the ass? “Didn’t work too well here”, but who cares. Fucking think about it buddy.
 
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Jem4417

Well-Known Member
Where’s the thread for debating unconventional cutting methods that have been seen through the years? We can put a big warning, disclaimer and esign so everyone is viewing at their own risk. Is it wrong to discuss the idea of the cut and why it was tried? If you have access to a chainsaw and see a video online and go and try it with no training, experience or fundamental knowledge your getting what’s coming to you. If their a youngster blame the parents
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Where’s the thread for debating unconventional cutting methods that have been seen through the years? We can put a big warning, disclaimer and esign so everyone is viewing at their own risk. Is it wrong to discuss the idea of the cut and why it was tried? If you have access to a chainsaw and see a video online and go and try it with no training, experience or fundamental knowledge your getting what’s coming to you. If their a youngster blame the parents
You really want to stand by those words Jem?

The subpar cutting displayed in Logger Wades vid is the kind that gets both the experienced and the inexperienced hurt.

Funny thing is it doesn't appear that it worked that well . What a fucking surprise!

Why not just make nice clean undercut, which you gun to compensate for the side lean. Follow it up with a non trick back-cut, and taper your hinge leaving it fat uphill, while being sure NOT to destroy your downhill hinge. Pound a few wedges on the low side to push her into your undercut, and hit your lay.
 
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New2trees

Active Member
You really want to stand by those words Jem?

The subpar cutting displayed in Logger Wades vid is the kind that gets both the experienced and the inexperienced hurt.

Funny thing is it didn't really work. What a fucking surprise!

Why not just make nice clean undercut, which you gun to compensate for the side lean. Follow it up with a non trick back-cut, and taper your hinge leaving it fat uphill, while being sure NOT to destroy your downhill hinge. Pound a few wedges on the low side to push her into your undercut, and hit your lay.

Never could relate to the whole kuntry bumpkin routine either.....however I guess that's the good thing for a novice like me, they were so busy doing their "act" they hardly even explained or showed the cutting technique on the video.
 
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