Tapered Hinge: Diar(y)rhea of a thread gone wrong and left un-moderated

Use Tapered Hinge against Side Lean?

  • Huh?

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Never

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hardly

    Votes: 1 3.7%
  • Sometimes

    Votes: 15 55.6%
  • Preferably

    Votes: 7 25.9%
  • Religiously

    Votes: 4 14.8%

  • Total voters
    27
  • Poll closed .

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
#7
More importantly than a tapered hinge I tend to off target the notch the opposite direction of the lean. Only a few degrees normally and never more than 45 unless we are going exactly 180 and of course ALWAYS dependent on species and sometimes temperature.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#8
Oops. I didn't realize that our own Daniel Murphy wrote the article. Gawd knows I have no desire for another pissing match with Daniel, but in a recent nation wide poll 9.95 out of 10 timber fallers agreed that cutting your hinge when felling trees is un-American, unacceptable, a threat to world peace, and very rarely a good idea!
 
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#9
Wow, glad to see things have changed!
Perhaps Daniel's article increased saturation; he is still around sometimes to comment on his own works.
.
For me, on the ground is where i l-earned this; 1 trial per tree.
But in climbing same tree might use Tapered Hinge a 100 times!
Anytime folding to side is the target, claim down as the sidelean
>> and essentially make Tapered Hinge pointing down against side resistance and fold to chosen path.
.
As Daniel points out we found this puts less downward pull on the rope, and in felling hits the ground softer i think. So besides practicing, not feeding directly into harshest pull is another reason to fold to side of lean when don't have to.
.
There are 2 profiles to hinge, we reduce leveraged resistance to fall with backcut by reducing narrowest part of hinge
and maintain leveraged resistance to sideLean with longer width profile of hinge .
Tapered Hinge seeks to give same resistance to path in shape of hinge, but then greater against sideLean.
.
Center Punch face removes even more fold forward resistance, that can be re-apportioned to fat side of taper against sideLean.
To come back to same fold forward resistance, but increased sidewards resistance.
.
Have even used in bucking top bind, bind at high noon as sidelean,
target 1:30-2:00 fold, so not to severest pinch, lower fat side of Tapered Hinge helps pull across away from severest pinch, and give extra room for movement relief.
A Dutchman kerf in top part of hinge can close help push to side also,
As well as dropping a wedge, chunk of wood, or even 'sloppily' cutting piece of facing and let it fall into same top part of hinge as Dutchman to serve to side.
.
i always try to prove all hinging theories across all 3 hinging scenarios:felling, climbing, bucking to cross-verify and expand theories and understandings in cross-comparison.
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In tree while thinning small verticals out of way, waiting on ground crew etc. would makesmall tapered hinges and hand pull the small verticals at different angles, put in/take out dutch step etc. Pulling forward,feel the bind, pull at angle see how different, push back up to open face, and adjust, try again. How many times do we get to re-re-retry different faces on same exact scenario to sift out and leave behind all but pertinent factors?
.
dang, work time!
 
#10
Seems poll shows a potential convert in the congregation?
.
Center of Gravity (CoG)is tree balance point, sum total balance of pulls etc.
>>so that tree architecture could change but as long as the same CoG would handle roughly same
.
Pic shows easy fall forward lean;
then complicates with added sideLean.
>>side note: falling sideLean is not to fiercest fall/hit direction like falling directly into lean!
.



.
Pic speaks of hinge G,H reversed, meaning fat side wrongly towards sideLean
>>but still presents same forward fold resistance to target direction on thinnest hinge axis/path of least resistance offered.
 
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rico

Well-Known Member
#11
Jeezus! Guys have been using tapered hinge since the dawn of time to help assist trees into their lay. Nothing new or revolutionary here. Cutting off the downhill/lean side of your hinge as pictured in the article can and will get you in trouble. Sure as shit.
 
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Daniel

Well-Known Member
#13
@rico

when you're right, you're right... Those pictures sucked (especially the mulberry and the rotted cherry) and its a shame cause I worked hard on that piece, and the editors must have liked it, because they didn't change a word. Unfortunately I didn't have any good pictures of tapered hinges at the time, so I submitted what you saw and have regretted it ever since... Lesson learned... when you publish something in print, there is no un-ringing that bell.

That said, there is a pic in the article similar to this hinge, which I will defend as being very effective at controlling against side lean... this one worked very well, better than I expected... Removing the entire compression side corner on a hinge might be problematic on a bigger tree, where the shear weight of the tree could collapse the compression side corner. But on this relatively small, but significant side leaner, it worked... tapered hinge ash.jpg
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
#14
This one worked well too.. again not a big tree... the stringy fibers showed good holding ability.. locust hinges very well tapered hinge small locst.jpg
 
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Daniel

Well-Known Member
#17
Those weren't hard to find..

and just because "controversy is good".. here's the final one for you rico... Call this one an "irregular hinge".. was half heatedly irregular hinge.jpg trying to "semi-gut" the hinge with the back cut, leaving the hinge slightly fatter on the far side

Haha.. call me lazy, but it worked
 

craneguy1

Well-Known Member
#18
Wasn't there someone on here about a year ago that mentioned a tapered hinge was proven not to work any better than a properly executed open-faced? I have had awesome luck with a tapered both in and out of the tree when needed...arbormaster level 1 certified circa 2000...
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
#19
It wasn't just on here...

For some reason controversy just seems to follow me everywhere I go...

Ken Palmer took me aside at TCIA expo in 2004, right after the article was published and explained that my pictures sucked (haha rico) and that his scientist buddies in Germany had proved that the tapered hinge has no effect at controlling side lean...

At the same time the article was criticized elsewhere as being on a topic so simplistic and obvious that "you might as well write an article about where to put the gas and oil in a chainsaw"...

I personally have had great success leading to much better confidence using the tapered hinge, but I have noticed just a few times where it seems like it didn't provide added holding which leads me to wonder just how reliable it is and what are the factors that influence its effectiveness..

If you look closely at those photos, you;ll notice there is little or no stump shot, meaning that the back cuts are level with the floor of the notch. Perhaps stump shot reduces the effectiveness of the tapered hinge...

I'd call it 90+% effective, but its very hard to quantify these things...
 

rico

Well-Known Member
#20
This one worked well too.. again not a big tree... the stringy fibers showed good holding ability.. locust hinges very well
A few gawd awful stumps there Daniel, but the attachment of the little locust really takes the cake! You forget your saw that day? Even my wife cringed when she saw that one!

You do realize you can execute a perfect tapered hinge without cutting off your compressed/downhill hinge? You do that shit in the wood I work with and bad things are gonna happen. Guaranteed!

A little 48" DBH side leaning Red that just needed a gentle tapered hinge, a few wedges, and a little patience, and she hit the intended lay. Easy Parcheezy.




DSC_0266 copy.JPG
 
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