Stihl Duro Saw (carbide tip) Chains ?

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
Anyone care to comment on using the 33-RD-72 (Duro-Yellow) Vs 33-RS-72 ?

They are expensive; $150; special sharpening at $1.00/bar inch. (needs special stone)

I'm running an Stihl 044 w/ 20" bar.
Simple felling in my own woods, and bucking for my own firewood.

The Stihl web-site reviews seem to be very positive (very long life/sharpness), or very negative.

I seem to be running into a lot of dirt included in codominant trunks, stones, etc.

I have not started to sharpening myself.
 
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Mark Chisholm

Administrator
I don't personally use the carbide much. We have bought it when working on jobs with a lot of felling in Sandy soils, but that is about it. Normally I'm not a fan due to the sharpening process. If needed then that's a great option.
 

Fabz

Member
Anyone care to comment on using the 33-RD-72 (Duro-Yellow) Vs 33-RS-72 ?

They are expensive; $150; special sharpening at $1.00/bar inch. (needs special stone)

I'm running an Stihl 044 w/ 20" bar.
Simple felling in my own woods, and bucking for my own firewood.

The Stihl web-site reviews seem to be very positive (very long life/sharpness), or very negative.

I seem to be running into a lot of dirt included in codominant trunks, stones, etc.

I have not started to sharpening myself.
I would stick with the hss chains and learn how to sharpen and set the rakers ... I could see for Fire/rescue and those type apps but for firewood it's overkill
 

96coal449

Well-Known Member
I always wanted a carbide chain for cutting stumps lower before grinding. Never pursued because of the additional sharpening requirements. I currently hand sharpen and don't have a grinder for stone sharpening.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
It's really great chain what needed. Some use it for demo jobs instead of a sawzall.

The official word is it is 10 times less likely to dull than standard chain from what I remember. What we do is buy 2 and rotate them and get them sharpened on a diamond wheel .
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
I decided to start sharpening myself.
Bought Guides for 3/8 & 3/8P; will practice on some old chain but it looks easy.
It also looks faster than I originally thought.
I think Stihl recommends have a chain "pro-ground" after ~5 manual sharpenings. Do folks actually do this ?

I may buy one Duro for "emergency" use.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I decided to start sharpening myself.
Bought Guides for 3/8 & 3/8P; will practice on some old chain but it looks easy.
It also looks faster than I originally thought.
I think Stihl recommends have a chain "pro-ground" after ~5 manual sharpenings. Do folks actually do this ?

I may buy one Duro for "emergency" use.
Never have, always have hand sharpened... rarely on a very dinged up chain I will pull out a crescent wrench or calipers to make sure the cutters are the same.

Most all the power sharpening that I've seen cooks the steel. Always blue in the corner from heat buildup.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
I will run through a loop two or three times around on the grinder to get the rocked teeth sharp. Trying to do it in less than needed will ruin the temper. Less is more.
 

Matt15194

New Member
When sharpening on a grinder I use Kool-Grind G-440 to stop tempering. Comes in a small tube almost like a grease pencil. Apply to spinning stone. This stuff works. I use it with my Oregon hydraulic grinder.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
https://granberg.com/product/g440-kool-grind-grind-cooler-and-longer/ $2.75 per tube.



For rocked chains, I've used a $30 Harbor Freight grinder given to me that I've never gotten around to replacing, as I hand-file well, and typically do. Home depot sells a similar one. 11 years and going.

A 'rocked' chain will wear out a file quickly. The grinder doesn't care. A little touch up with a file afterward, and rakers, and go.
The saved files will pay off a cheap grinder quickly.


If you're considering a very expensive chain and outsourcing grinding, I'd just buy a grinder for $30-400 (cheapo to good quality).
 

Matt15194

New Member
"Southsoundtree" that is the stuff. I should clarify since this thread is about carbide chain that I have never tried Kool-Grind on the diamond wheels needed to sharpen carbide. I don't use the grinder that much. Mainly for damaged chains or when I have a new guy that hand filed a chain wrong to the point it is easier to put is on the grinder to square it back up. Hand filing in the field just makes sense for us.
 

jabezkin

Member
I know this is an old thread but I got some carbide cabin for stumping.
Also setting up to grind it. Got a Stihl diamond wheel and an extra grinder to fit it.

Ground a lot of carbide as a Tool and Die maker. So it shan’t be too bad.

I’ll report back when I screw them up.
 

rustykfd

Member
I buy 3/8 .063 RDR chain by the 100' spool at the fire department and we throw most loops away once it is beat up too much. It is magnitudes tougher than steel chain, but it doesn't cut wood as well and it's expensive. For fire/rescue use, I believe it's the best out there.

I've not found anyone local to me that will grind carbide.
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
I know this is an old thread but I got some carbide cabin for stumping.
Also setting up to grind it. Got a Stihl diamond wheel and an extra grinder to fit it.
Ground a lot of carbide as a Tool and Die maker. So it shan’t be too bad.
I’ll report back when I screw them up.
Look forward to reports ...........
 

rustykfd

Member
I’ve been grinding carbide for 40 years.
Don’t see any problems.
I get and refurbish a lot of “ruined “ tooling.
We maybe can work something out.
I’ll start saving the bad loops. I’ll give you a shout when I have enough to mess with.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

jabezkin

Member
Shouldn’t be but a week or so.
I got some stumping to do.
Most shops don’t have a grinder for carbide as the payback sucks compared to regular chain.
A machinist has no shame when it comes to tools.You stand the angle up t to give the tooth some strength.
Demolition and stumping probably have different angles.
Measure a new one if you can.
 

rustykfd

Member
Shouldn’t be but a week or so.
I got some stumping to do.
Most shops don’t have a grinder for carbide as the payback sucks compared to regular chain.
A machinist has no shame when it comes to tools.You stand the angle up t to give the tooth some strength.
Demolition and stumping probably have different angles.
Measure a new one if you can.
If we get this going, I’ll just send you a new tooth for setup.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

jabezkin

Member
I got behind. The other machinist at work got an infection in his replaced knee so I’ve been covering for him.

Sorry for the delay
 
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