Sticht Hitch

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
Back on the garage, used a quickie to capture the rope behind the cross to prevent excess wear on the cord there. Connected the quickie behind the first braid before the cord enters the ring and it seems to push the wraps when tending which makes it a lot smoother.
Trying to come up with ways to make thi
Can you post a pic of that? I think I know what you mean, but I'm not sure.
 

Louhut

Member
Got cut off on the post above.

I am trying to make the hitch a bit smoother on a single line by spreading friction into the twist in the ring with hardware instead of cord to make the system more friendly to textiles. The quickie is good because I can snap it in midline
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
60649

The small green cord tied to the ring lifts the four sections of cord going through the ring and pushes up the wraps at the same time making for easy tending.

Using something like a ring, shackle, Quickie, or toggle under the twist would take the wear off that point and doesn’t seem to hinder the performance of the hitch. With the hitch being adjustable, a ring, or something similar shouldn’t effect how the hitch works.

There can be too much friction removed, like below. The four sections of rope going through the ring apparently are needed for the hitch to easily release for descending. With only the wraps grabbing the rope, it was difficult to descend on, like a typical hitch.
60650
 

Louhut

Member
When I can I’ll always more photos of what I came up with. It’s like the green cord you have as well as taking wear away from the cross. Also tends really well because when tended from beneath (by hand not be chest attachment) the quickie is pushed up into the wraps.

I want to use this hitch more at work to find out where these little variations will work well.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
For hand tending, with the right length, a double eye tending strap makes the hitch slide up instantly when pulling up on the rope, so that the hitch has no tension on it.
 

Louhut

Member
I need to make one of those.
Hitch cord cover with some accessory cord stitched together inside should do it right?

Having a pulley beneath the hitch works but can bump the hitch a certain way and it will bind for me anyway, I use a pinto and a phlotich regularly and they are ok for the most part
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
That’s a good way to do it, nice and neat. I’ve made two that way with heat resistant cover. Another is made from T100, technora core, tied in a sliding double fisherman’s knot, with covers on each leg to make threading through the eye easier, but not necessary.
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
To get away from the way to tie an SRT hitch to the potential uses: Do you think a sticht hitch variation would be good for rescue situations? It seems like using an SRT capable hitch DRT or with a wrench should allow easy 2 person descents.
Speaking of using it with a wrench, has anyone tried using the sticht hitch with a hitchhiker? Don't know if it's necessary, but someone could try that I think.
 

Louhut

Member
Speaking of using it with a wrench, has anyone tried using the sticht hitch with a hitchhiker? Don't know if it's necessary, but someone could try that I think.
Yes! The man from the video that was posted in the thread the other day of the hitch being tied and used. He is called Julian, he posted a few videos of the hitch on Instagram, one was with the wrench and one with the HH. They seemed to be very smooth.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
The Sticht works good with the Wrench, it eliminates the hard tug at first when descending, as the Wrench is rotating and engaging. I didn’t notice any improvement with the HH over other hitches.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
60669
The double plates might give more heat transference than the rings.

Another variation on this type of hitch came up while testing an additional twist for use with a large ring. A Reef knot was easy to tie and required a slightly longer hitch cord, 80 mm, or 32” in the photo, but has the advantage of posi-locking the amount of tension you want in the wraps. The size of the ring isn’t as important with this variation.
There is more friction in the bottom part of the hitch which makes it easier to start descending, the Sticht could be a little jerky at first, like the Wrench.
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Pushing down on the ring after tying, before body weight loading, seemed to position the ring just right automatically.

What’s a good name for this hitch?
 

Louhut

Member
What’s a good name for this hitch?
I like the name ‘Reef Rack’ like rope rack :)

That looks to be a big change with how you’ve been tying these! I will try that when I get chance.

It looks like that hitch could be harder to adjust tension on the wraps unlike the sticht where you would push some cordage through the twist and have less friction on the wraps. Would getting the right friction at the wraps on the first go be the way to do it because it would take a while to push slack through the reef knot I think.

Maybe a machard loop with a double fisherman’s on the backside could work as well? Would be good to find out how that works, I’m not with my kit for a few days now so I will be watching from the sidelines.

I made my first tending strap today, it works really really well with the sticth and also more conventional systems. Placing the strap inside the quickie for the sticth will make the tending instant and with less wear to the twisted cord behind the quickie as well as creating another wear point to spread wear.

If you made it to the bottom; here are some photos.
 

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Brocky

Well-Known Member
The Sticht tends easily without the strap, but with it, like you stated, the tending is instantaneous, with less friction, no waiting for the pulley to rotate up against the wraps.
The adjusting is best done before loading. With some experience, it’s easy to visually know if it is adjusted right, and sliding it up and down before loading, again with some experience, will tell if there is the right amount of wrap tension.
 

Louhut

Member
Longer tails will be nice with that one to allow some slack for tying and adjusting before loading. Looks like it would take a good length of cord. I only really use tied eyes so a large ring Is easier to pass the eyes through or I could try the quickie as well and see how that works.
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
View attachment 60669
The double plates might give more heat transference than the rings.

Another variation on this type of hitch came up while testing an additional twist for use with a large ring. A Reef knot was easy to tie and required a slightly longer hitch cord, 80 mm, or 32” in the photo, but has the advantage of posi-locking the amount of tension you want in the wraps. The size of the ring isn’t as important with this variation.
There is more friction in the bottom part of the hitch which makes it easier to start descending, the Sticht could be a little jerky at first, like the Wrench.
View attachment 60670
View attachment 60671
Pushing down on the ring after tying, before body weight loading, seemed to position the ring just right automatically.

What’s a good name for this hitch?
I gotta ask what the cordage is Brock!!!? Looks too thin to be 10 mm op
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
The first is Warpspeed II, the other is Tendon’s Timber cord, both are 8mm. Moss recommended the Warpspeed in another thread, it is not heat resistant, but it slides and grips so good, it’s now my favorite. The Tendon cord is also very good, I’m hoping to get some in bulk form for splicing.
 

Louhut

Member
Made a shorter tending loop, as soon as any rope is pulled the hitch moves, very good idea by Brocky.
The swivel is just another one of the countless variations, don’t see any upside to it.

Have tried the hitch with the reef knot on a small and big ring, tends very well. Due to the tightness of reef knot there will be likely no slippage of cord into the wraps or down onto the eyes of the cord, a larger ring with the sticth could do this; however, like brocky said, an extra twist could be adequate tension. You’ll be able to maintain the same tension on the wraps through out a whole climb because of the reef knot. Only downside in my eyes is the lack of adjustability, the quickie would work well with this to help introduce slack through the knot and into the wraps of it were to bind.
 

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Brocky

Well-Known Member
The use of the swivel is brilliant, I never thought of using one, like you stated, no advantage, but looks unique. The Reef knot is harder to adjust, but not too much, definitely easier than the overhand knot used in the Oval VT.
 
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