Sticht Hitch

Louhut

Member
if you like hitches then follow that man on here.
I love hitches, there will always be a place for them. A lot of the time I use a hitch over y mechanicals for how fun they can be to mess around with.

I’m currently using a 34mm DMM ring, and a 45mm petzl ring for my testing here in the garage. Trying to make the hitch and the rope touch the ring as much as with different configurations based on the Sticth Hith so that I can help to relieve friction from the rope. It’s tricky.
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
I love hitches, there will always be a place for them. A lot of the time I use a hitch over y mechanicals for how fun they can be to mess around with.

I’m currently using a 34mm DMM ring, and a 45mm petzl ring for my testing here in the garage. Trying to make the hitch and the rope touch the ring as much as with different configurations based on the Sticth Hith so that I can help to relieve friction from the rope. It’s tricky.
Very gd please report back to us with your findings because I know Brock is really listening and trying to develop this hitch
 

Louhut

Member
if you like hitches then follow that man on here.
I love hitches, there will always be a place for them. A lot of the time I use a hitch over y mechanicals for how fun they can be to mess around with.

I’m currently using a 34mm DMM ring, and a 45mm petzl ring for my testing here in the garage. Trying to make the hitch and the rope touch the ring as much as with different configurations based on the Sticth Hith so that I can help to relieve friction from the rope. It’s tricky.

These photos I’ve took now show a variation that has two rings and has four points of contact between rope and ring, it could help to take some way from the hitch cord
 

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Brocky

Well-Known Member
I’m playing around with a similar concept with a ring and Sticht plate.
60528

The smaller ring would probably be the best choice. The i.d. of the ring should be small to trap the twist, which then doesn’t allow slack to transfer to the eye legs, which will eventually cause the hitch to bind, 28-30mm would be best.
Firm hitch cords work better than something like Beeline, which has a looser cover and cause unneeded friction.
Myself, I’m not concerned with dissipating heat through the hitch. Go slow and on longer descents I’ll use a descending device to take all the wear and heat off of the hitch.
 

Louhut

Member
I’m going to try and create a series of small pinch points between two rings and maybe that’ll allow the hitch to be a bit more controllable, maybe a similar concept to the hitch hiker; dogbone and steel carabiner like.
 

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Louhut

Member
34mm on top 40mm on bottom. Works ok on my weight, too much friction at rings do smooth tending but coming down is not an issue. Need to find a way to stop binding at the rings
 

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Brocky

Well-Known Member
There is adjustability of the amount of friction in the wraps by where the ring is placed, closer to the wraps causes more friction, farther away there is less, to the point it can be loosened to no longer grab reliably.
The ring and twist can be used below other normal hitches to act like a Hitch Hiker. Doesn’t work very good above the hitch, like the Wrench, as it interferes with how the hitch grabs.
Your hitch in the last picture might work for awhile, but would probably start to bind with extended use, there’s nothing to stop the wraps from tightening up.
 

Louhut

Member
Going to make some smaller adjustments, I don’t have a sticth plate so I’m going to try and mess with altering the twists, how i set them, cordage length and where the rings go. But right now, I’ve swapped the rings around and it seems to work ok. I’ll see how t reacts this time. Tending is a lot better and has less friction at wraps now the rings are a bit lower.
 

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climbstihl

Well-Known Member
Great stuff. I need to mess with those when I'm back, the extreme rope friction at the back twist always bothered me when desending more than a foot or so.
 

Louhut

Member
The rings seem to move around a lot when tending. More moving parts would mean more variables to consider. Between ascent and descent the rings can move up and which can make descents tough, you can grab both rings and pull them down to increase friction at the rings. Would like it to be simpler
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
@Brocky that's the first method I'll try. Don't know why I didn't think of it myself, it's so simple. Unfortunately, I won't be back to my stuff for over a month, I might get withdrawal symptoms. Hopefully my treestuff and climbing innovations orders coming in the mail will satisfy my need for geemar fondling...
 

Louhut

Member
Sticth Hitch tied using a shackle or a quickie would help when tying with larger cordage or tied terminations on hitch cord, because you can open it up and just pass the cord into the shackle. Shackle pin could also roll when tending and possibly make it easier. Not tried this variation out, just tied it in the boot of my car after a long day at work and getting the work truck stuck in a rut...
 

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John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Sticth Hitch tied using a shackle or a quickie would help when tying with larger cordage or tied terminations on hitch cord, because you can open it up and just pass the cord into the shackle. Shackle pin could also roll when tending and possibly make it easier. Not tried this variation out, just tied it in the boot of my car after a long day at work and getting the work truck stuck in a rut...
You're right that a Quickie can also be used like a ring on a Sticht hitch. It seems like a good reason, especially now if you buy a Notch Quickie on sale at Sherrill, while they still cost $20, same as many aluminum rings.

Here's my DdRT rope with a Sticht Hitch. Not sure I need all the extra wraps, but it all fits together well.

65566246_468903243867402_8010671592579268608_n.jpg
 
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Brocky

Well-Known Member
Looks good, Lou. I’ve only used a bow shackle when using tied eyes, it looks better with the Quickie, and your hitch cord has enough length for adjusting.

Hey John, with the larger ring maybe drop a wrap and add one more twist, to see if it helps stop the gradual binding that you’re getting.
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Looks good, Lou. I’ve only used a bow shackle when using tied eyes, it looks better with the Quickie, and your hitch cord has enough length for adjusting.

Hey John, with the larger ring maybe drop a wrap and add one more twist, to see if it helps stop the gradual binding that you’re getting.
Having a rope that I can commit to DdRT only, now gives me the luxury of using the Stitch Hitch exclusively for DdRT, with a lot less concern for binding issues. A particular rope I have isn't as well suited for SRT as my other static climbing ropes. In fact, on an SRT Sticht Hitch system, I'd stay with a thicker 9.3mm hitch cord and use ropes that don't flatten as much, like Drenaline, but for DdRT, I can use Ocean 8mm, or other 8mm eye&eye hitch cords with less SRT friendly ropes.

The way I see it, compared to SRT, using a hitch tending system with a pulley works well enough on DdRT, so clearly the Sticht Hitch should work even better. Evidently the hitch cord's crosses inside the ring adds more friction than if using a hitch tending pulley system, thereby alleviating the hitch knot's wraps of a certain amount of friction, similar to the Hitch Hiker. I'm still experimenting with the DdRT side of using a Stitch Hitch and this is still mostly hypothetical. Once I have a chance to run it some more on DdRT, I'll be able to share my experiences more definitively. The Sticht's main concern is managing the hitch cord's wear and knowing when to retire the cord.
 
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Louhut

Member
@Brocky Yep, using less wraps (I like 3) and having the ring close up to the wraps will let me find an initial grabbing point.

If it slips at this point (baring in mind this is the most friction available), I’d have to add a wrap. If it grabs tightly I have the room to adjust the ring away from the wraps and allow smoother tending and less binding. Great hitch!!

Next thing is to find a way to keep the ring fixed in place whilst climbing so it can’t work up the hitch which would cause a bind if there’s too many wraps. The split bolt connector you had would do this but would also add more droppable pieces into the hitch. Adding another twist in the rope would also work but Would be hard to pull off with a small ring because the cord would bunch up around the rope and ring and not contact the rope as much (I’d have to test this out to confirm).

So what I’m thinking is to add some sort of pin or rod between the twist and the rope. It would help keep the twist down low or up high depending on your preference and would also help take heat away from the twist, which seems to be the main wear point of the hitch. Even tending the hitch from the twist Seems to accelerate wear.

I look forward to the advancement of this hitch!
 

Louhut

Member
Back on the garage, used a quickie to capture the rope behind the cross to prevent excess wear on the cord there. Connected the quickie behind the first braid before the cord enters the ring and it seems to push the wraps when tending which makes it a lot smoother.
Trying to come up with ways to make thi
 
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