Sthil 2 in 1 Sharpening gauge

fhudo

Member
I am thinking about buying one but have a question:
Does it ensure the length of each tooth is the same or is it still necessary to count file strokes to ensure an even chain?




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Keeth

Active Member
The rails bend over time and the depth gauges get a bit lower than they should. It’s a great tool for every third or fourth sharpening, but its freedom of movement still requires a disciplined hand for consistency. As with any approach, you’ll likely need to hit each tooth with the same number of strokes. Have you tried the Husqvarna roller guides? No guess work and it’ll teach you (muscle memory) to be a better sharpener.
 
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joezilla11

Active Member
I tried this and the pferd version and I hated it. Chain would never sharpen right and/or it would end up pulling to one side because the depth gauges wouldn’t file evenly. I ditched them, took some time and research and learned how to file by hand and I’m glad I did. It’s so easy now, even in the field and as simple as it gets.
 

Chaplain242

Well-Known Member
I use these all the time unless there chipped teeth to contend with. If chipped teeth are present I use the original files and guides to hack away and get teeth even again, and finish with this tool. To use these effectively you cant push downwards with any significant pressure otherwise the guides bend and you will get depth differences left and right, and lose ability to cut straight.

Also dont be tempted to push too much into the tooth of the chain or file will bend into a curve and not sharpen properly, and position won't be right and the cut will suffer.

To use needs discipline - counting cuts as per normal, and having a steady hand to ensure consistent angles and position. Need to resist temptation to push at all times.

I consistently get very sharp chains with these, but if the files start to blunt - you need to replace them before you get tempted to push with more force again and bend the guide bars. If cutting clear of the ground and no chance of gravel/concrete inclusion contact (ie hidden in the bark) I will use the 12v Stihl stone sharpening tool to finish, for razor sharp chains, however if chain that sharp hits something hard it dulls instantly.

We have a lot of bauxite where I live (Aluminium Oxide) and find the hard Stihl chains tend to chip if they touch the gravel. Softer Oregon chains tend to roll the edge which can be straightened again with a hammer before sharpening so can extend life of chains in these conditions.

Also replacement files are special, and come in a two pack. Standard three pack files dont fit correctly. Many shops forget to stock the replacement files - so stock up yourself.

Also dont allow CRC or other similar lubricant near plastic ends or all the guides will slip out and you will need to buy another one as nothing will glue to the plastic (to refit the guides) again.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
I have 2 of these and use the 3/8p extensively. I agree that you still have to have a solid technique. The 2-n-1 does three things for you: 1) makes it pretty easy to get the angle especially if your eyes aren't what they used to be; 2) hits the depth gauge at the same time, which I really prefer; and 3) the fat handles are easy on the hands. Otherwise, it's just metal files like any sharpening system. But, I like them and won't go back if I don't have to.
 
I find these guides leave the rakers too low, which results in grabby teeth, and a saw that bogs easily if the guide is used for every sharpening. I have had good results with using them on every third sharpening.
 

Barc Buster

Well-Known Member
I had a similar experience with them until I learned not to press down too hard. Let the file do the work and use very light back pressure into the gullet of the tooth. The depth gauges have been very good since I started using a gentler hand with mine.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
^^^
What he said. I measured both of my stihls and one pferd with feeler gauge and they all are right there at .025". I also HAD a habit of pressing too hard when filing. I noticed though I didn't press as hard with Oregon chain as its softer than stihl, lolol, and helped break me of the habit.

Its worth noting though that I had an issue initially with the cutters getting filed more on one side. This was just poor technique, but I think the 2-n-1 may exacerbate because the large handles make it easy to use too much pressure. I think it was with saw on left filing left cutters. Too easy to tghten biceps and put body into it and take lots of metal.
 
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southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Is the 0.025" offset the only choice?

That's good on average with new cutters, but when worn, I move down in file size toward the end of the cutter, and increase my raker-offset. The tooth is narrower, so using less cutting power. You can often take a thicker chip. I have heard up to 0.040" in soft wood.

Guides are guides.

Good guides will allow you to sharpen accurately to their settings, only.

Learning to hand-file without production pressure, with good body-positioning, in good light, and maybe with a magnifying glass or cheater-glasses, is not that hard. One linear motion. Don't cut corners. Sharpen until its sharp. I teach people all the time.

Square-grind, that's a tough thing to learn, I hear. I've never tried. Not applicable.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Is the 0.025" offset the only choice?
Yes, but you can still use an additional depth gauge after the sharpen if you prefer.

I move down in file size toward the end of the cutter
You can change the file size in less than 15 seconds. I drop down in size as well on worn chains.

Good guides will allow you to sharpen accurately to their settings, only.
This thing really is just a file guide that just happens to have a depth gauge file built in, and some big fat handles setup to 30 degrees that a blind man could get right. The depth file can be removed pretty quickly if desired. You ARE limited in how low into the cutter you go because of the guide rails, so if you want more hook, you may be SOL without going to smaller file. If you don't like 30deg angle, you can put a line on the handle or the rails to get another angle.

These devices are made to quickly and easily get the edge back on the cutter and make sure the depth gauge follows. They do that very well and very fast. Even if you need something more specialized, the device can be versatile enough to revert back to the role of a simple file guide. They can't totally replace traditional, but they are pretty versatile. Here's where they are in a league of their own: I talked a 15 year old kid who had never picked up a chainsaw through a chain sharpen from the tree and it came out fine. And my regular helper had no problem picking up some of the sharpening duties. That's why I like them, lol.
 
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