Steel toe boots okay or a no no?

PUClimber

Active Member
I am new to this utility stuff and enjoy the logging style boots and have seen many with steel toes and was wondering how big of a deal this was. I know metal is a conductor and all that but in a set of spurs that are already some kind of metal does it really matter or is this something that is better off being avoided as steel toe is concerned?
 

jcarufel

Active Member
I have had people at work tell me that you aren't supposed to wear them because of the conducting factor but those same people wear boots with steel shanks. Kinda goes against what they are saying.

Steel toes are A-OK in my book just don't drop a big old log on your toes, they would turn into a bear trap!
 

UpYourTree

Member
As long as they have the green triangle and orange omega symbol they are fine, Omega denotes electrical shock resistance.

Both my pairs are steel toe with omega.
 

CreTree

Active Member
I have a pair of Redwing climbers that I have been climbing with for a long time. Cold in the winter if you're not in a tree! I have a friend in the local rescue that suggested composite toe boots( who would of thunk it?) to date I haven't found any but a good idea I suppose. I am curious myself. I hate cold toes!!
 

BostonBull

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I have a pair of Redwing climbers that I have been climbing with for a long time. Cold in the winter if you're not in a tree! I have a friend in the local rescue that suggested composite toe boots( who would of thunk it?) to date I haven't found any but a good idea I suppose. I am curious myself. I hate cold toes!!

[/ QUOTE ]

Hoffmans Boots makes a few pairs with composite and steel toe that are ANSI approved. Check them out in the EH approved boot section.

http://www.hoffmanboots.com/Category.aspx?CategoryID=35
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Are you looking for crush protection or cut protection?

When 'tests' are conformed to prove a point they aren't quite as valid as ones that are conformed to real situations.

In the cutting test I can't figure out how I would ever get the saw into either of the cutting positions in the test.

I've pretty sure that the saw would cut the composite toe at an angle too but...that is the way that a chainsaw user would whack their toe so setup the test that way.
 

UpYourTree

Member
I've caught my boot twice with a saw, both times with a 026, on the ground chopping brush, (we wind row on our R.O.W's).

First time left inside of my right boot, right at the edge of the toe cap, 2nd time straight centre of my right boot, both times exposed the steel, in the video the test to the centre of the boot is very relevant, just turn the saw around.
 

CreTree

Active Member
Thanks for the link Bull. I tapped my toe with my 272 xp WOT once; on the ground buckin some oak. SCARY, to say the least, but no damage or wouldn't still be in the biz. I have to say that the vid is only as accurate as the cuts presented.?? We'll see, I still have another year or two with these Redwings, after all they're only 19 years old. Love that beeswax!
 

BUK

Member
Steel toes for utility work is just fine. There is probably a greater hazard from crushing injuries then there is from electricity.
 

Liam Antony

New Member
Steel Toe boots are great . Steel toes have been around protecting feet in the work field for many years. The plate situated over the toe area is constructed of heavy-duty steel. Because they are a safety toe OSHA requires them to meet ASTM standards and receive ratings for impact and compression. For example, A rating of I/75 means that the steel toe can withstand an impact of 75 lbs. A rating of C/75 is a compression rating of up to 2500 lbs. of pressure. Composite toes also referred to as a safety toe has to meet the ATSM standards as well and receive ratings.
 

Jim Maloney

New Member
Steel toes and the QLCTT. Another question that keeps arising every few years.

In my Foreman years, my response would have been "It doesn't seem to bother the lead in your (butt) so why would it bother the steel in your boots?"

Metals as part of your PPE have no effect on your body's conductivity as long as you are outside of the MAD, PUClimber.
 

JackieRedShoes

New Member
Check your company's policies.

If they have a policy against steel toe boots because of electrical conductivity, look for a job at a line clearance company that actually has a clue about the theory of electricity.
 
Top