Steel core or rope scare strap?

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
My first climbing instruction came from a Bell System lineman. He taught me 'scare strap' which was a flat belt and buckle. After using that, and fighting it all of the time, I did two things. Thought...Why would I call life support 'scare strap'? And converted to a rope lanyard with a hip adjuster. Never went back.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
A real Treeman doesn’t need a lanyard, for scaredy-cats only. My guess where the origin of that term started.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Gave up on wire core a long time ago. Fucking hate that stuff. Splice my own flip-lines out of 3/4"-7/8" 3 strand and they roll far better than any wire core when in 4 ft and bigger wood. Nothing like it. Just ask the old timers who were rolling up 12-15 foot monsters.
 

Tree slayer

New Member
My first climbing instruction came from a Bell System lineman. He taught me 'scare strap' which was a flat belt and buckle. After using that, and fighting it all of the time, I did two things. Thought...Why would I call life support 'scare strap'? And converted to a rope lanyard with a hip adjuster. Never went back.
My first climbing instruction came from a Bell System lineman. He taught me 'scare strap' which was a flat belt and buckle. After using that, and fighting it all of the time, I did two things. Thought...Why would I call life support 'scare strap'? And converted to a rope lanyard with a hip adjuster. Never went back.
Gave up on wire core a long time ago. Fucking hate that stuff. Splice my own flip-lines out of 3/4"-7/8" 3 strand and they roll far better than any wire core when in 4 ft and bigger wood. Nothing like it. Just ask the old timers who were rolling up 12-15 foot monsters.
i can’t stand the limpness of a non wire core lanyard to hard to flip up a big tree
 

rico

Well-Known Member
i can’t stand the limpness of a non wire core lanyard to hard to flip up a big tree
Au contraire my friend. When you are working in big wood (over 4 ft) you must know how roll your flip-line up a tree. Flipping or pushing your lanyard will get you nowhere. A 3 strand with a stiff hand in the 5/8" to 7/8" range is in my humble opinion the best tool for the job.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
My comment was about ‘scare strap’ being sort of self-defeating nomenclature. Not about suitability. When I figured out SRT ascent I stopped doing spike and flip line ascent s
 
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Tree slayer

New Member
Au contraire my friend. When you are working in big wood (over 4 ft) you must know how roll your flip-line up a tree. Flipping or pushing your lanyard will get you nowhere. A 3 strand with a stiff hand in the 5/8" to 7/8" range is in my humble opinion the best tool for the job.
I personally do the sloop for getting my Flipline up the tree rather than rolling it up
 

rico

Well-Known Member
You say potato, I say potatoe. Is this the technique you are talking about because it is the one I am speaking of. I can guarantee that fella is not using wire core. Most likely 7/8"-1" 4 strand manilla. Ran the same thing for years. We would actually get your line wet and let it dry which would give it a really nice stiff hand.
This was how I learned to climb. I was what was known as a pimp. I spurred up big sticks, top em, then hung blocks for the rigging to run through, and hung haywire for guylines. The rigged up trees were used as spar poles in the back end in a high lead setup.


 
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Tree slayer

New Member
You say potato, I say potatoe. Is this the technique you are talking about because it is the one I am speaking of. I can guarantee that fella is not using wire core. Most likely 7/8"-1" 4 strand manilla. Ran the same thing for years. We would actually get your line wet and let it dry which would give it a really nice stiff hand.
This was how I learned to climb. I was what was known as a pimp. I spurred up big sticks, top em, then hung blocks for the rigging to run through, and hung haywire for guylines. The rigged up trees were used as spar poles in the back end in a high lead setup.


I would agree on the fact that he is using a Manila Flipline in that video but it’s the technique he uses to flip his strap up the tree in talking about.its called the sloop or the west coast flip
 

rico

Well-Known Member
I would agree on the fact that he is using a Manila Flipline in that video but it’s the technique he uses to flip his strap up the tree in talking about.its called the sloop or the west coast flip
Its the exact technique I have been using for 40 yrs. On the west coast we just refer to
it as rolling your flip-line.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
That is must see TV. I love all the rigging! mechanical advantage etc... the first mechanical saws, a few years after that and the chainsaw would come and they could cut a whole lot more of those trees a whole lot faster.
I too love the old stuff Kev. I have pulled all kinds of cool old logging stuff out of the woods over the years. Steam donkey parts, mechanical saw parts, tons of cool rigging, misery whips, climbing gear, etc. A couple friends and myself actually found an amazing pair of spurs in a decrepit old loggers shack about 25 yrs ago. They must have been at least a 100 yrs old when we found them, and are I what I use when I get into old stuff with super shady bark, as they have 4 1/2"-5" gaffs on them. They are communal owned by a few of us and we pass them around as needed. There is also a real genuine saw pit on the parcel next to mine. Saw pits were used during the very early days of Redwood logging around here and are a rare sight in these parts. Could you imagine hand digging the hole necessary for a saw pit on a 14 ft diameter log? These men were some truly hard mofo's.
 
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