Splitting phases

Jeremy9

Member
Does OSHA have a rule against going between primary and secondary lines, if there is enough room to keep your approach distance.
 

banjo

Active Member
If you can maintain you M.A.D. without crouching in the bucket I think you're good. That's what I remember from my last EHAP anyway.
 

JJackson

New Member
M.A.D for a qualified line clearance arborist would be at least 2.5 feet if not 3 feet (add 6" more to those distances for elevations greater than 5000 feet) for the primary line(s) and 6" for the secondary line. I have seen some spans that you likely could go between the primary and secondary but I don't think that is the case with most of the line that I see. I have seen my crews do it on the rare occasion where they can maintain more than minimum clearance but if not they use their insulated tools from above/below or get the throw ball and gear out and climb it. It's not worth taking chances with.
 

tomthetreeman

Well-Known Member
There is a new rule about passing between wires that says something like "MAD is to include operator's potential reach" which makes passing between wires out of the question. Which is why all the utilities are going to elevators.

Tom
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
I generally keep away from street wires, and I'm pretty sure an Asplund employee told me that going between primary and secondary lines was ground for immediate termination, no warnings...
 

MaddieSMonkeY

New Member
our rule at hydro one is 3' above from primary and 1' below clearance from neutral.. that being said good luck getting to your work without crouching in all situations.
 

MaddieSMonkeY

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
there is always ways around splitting phases splitting a phase should always be last option

[/ QUOTE ]

how long have you been trimming around hydro lines for?
 

MaddieSMonkeY

New Member
As long as you can maintain your LOA that's what your paid to do as a professional. You should always look for alternative options.
 

RIVIEZZO TREE EXPERTS

Well-Known Member
EHAP class i took in new Hampshire instructor said splitting phases is a no go, no matter what. even if you m a d is met. i am guilty of doing it my self but have had to crouch in bucket
 

Jem4417

Well-Known Member
Company policy may play a role in this but if your a utility arborist directly working on line clearance you can. Secondary wires are "no touch" and as long as you can keep your approach distance, including your reach as stated a few posts before this, it is acceptable. Although when I was doing line clearance we were crouching under everything and minimum approach got broken on a daily basis. Not proud but it happens. Keep your insulation up to code with inspections, know your circuits and voltages and respect the lines
 
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