Spar System?

SamNQ

New Member
Any effective systems/techniques when working down a spar?

Currently mostly using running bowline with a tail to retrieve. Im interested in the monkey tail system to speed up the setup time. Any feedback is appreciated
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
I prefer using a screwlink over a biner.

If your climbing line has an eye put the link in it. Then use some other cordage for the pull down tail. The pull down tail isn't going to be climbed on so I like to color code it somehow. I've taken a chunk of old rope and pulled the core out to make it lighter and a different color. Easier on the hands than 1/4" cord or throwline.
 

SamNQ

New Member
I was envisioning with chiselbits post clipping the karabiner above the bowline bend then attaching the rope under your climb system, decend to next work station, pull bite down, cut repeat. I maybe wrong. if im correct all thats needed is the connector. Tom, why a screwlink instead of karabiner?jw
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
I’ve been chewing on an idea for spar srt. Tie/splice a quickie or ring to your rope end. Wrap end around spar, pull bight through ring/quickie. Attach grigri or akimbo (something quick on/off) to the bight. After cut, descend on bight through ring, lanyard for next cut, remove bight from device, pull tail to remove bight from ring and drop rope. Problem: rope is not attached to climber in any way during retrieval, should possibly keep running tail clipped through a Caritool or like.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I just use a alpine loop with canopy anchor type thing but around the trunk instead of a branch. I leave enough tail to retrieve from my next spot. A link of some sort between the climbing side of the rope and the alpine loop makes setup, retrieval and re-setup easier. I don't like having an additional rope for retrieval, just because it's more stuff and it doesn't improve the situation for me.
 

SamNQ

New Member
With that idea couldn't you find a way to introduce slack between you and the anchor to release pressure from the stem to allow the system to fall down to you. Like a adjustable bridge or even unclipping system and pointing upwards anchor ?
I’ve been chewing on an idea for spar srt. Tie/splice a quickie or ring to your rope end. Wrap end around spar, pull bight through ring/quickie. Attach grigri or akimbo (something quick on/off) to the bight. After cut, descend on bight through ring, lanyard for next cut, remove bight from device, pull tail to remove bight from ring and drop rope. Problem: rope is not attached to climber in any way during retrieval, should possibly keep running tail clipped through a Caritool or like.
 

SamNQ

New Member
I just use a alpine loop with canopy anchor type thing but around the trunk instead of a branch. I leave enough tail to retrieve from my next spot. A link of some sort between the climbing side of the rope and the alpine loop makes setup, retrieval and re-setup easier. I don't like having an additional rope for retrieval, just because it's more stuff and it doesn't improve the situation for me.
I've def considered it when starting my way down attacking the spar but I've never done it because I'm not fond of running metal clipped to the alpine butterfly for cinched mode. More importantly(for me) if there is a way to get away from fixed lengths for retrieval I'm on board with the least amount of gear necessary.
 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
I've def considered it when starting my way down attacking the spar but I've never done it because I'm not fond of running metal clipped to the alpine butterfly for cinched mode. More importantly(for me) if there is a way to get away from fixed lengths for retrieval I'm on board with the least amount of gear necessary.
What don't you like about metal in your butterfly? I actually use a steel rigging carabiner with the gate oriented away from the wood. A lot of people don't like that due to the possibility (however remote) of the tree rubbing the biner just right to open it. I've heard it has happened. I like it because I don't have to feed the entire working end thru the loop.
 

SamNQ

New Member
What don't you like about metal in your butterfly? I actually use a steel rigging carabiner with the gate oriented away from the wood. A lot of people don't like that due to the possibility (however remote) of the tree rubbing the biner just right to open it. I've heard it has happened. I like it because I don't have to feed the entire working end thru the loop.
I have more time using canopy anchors cinched rope on rope so it's probably a comfort thing. Having less things to double check ig is where I stand with it. I do trust steel carabiners in my rigging configurations, no question about it.


Not questioning what works for you n others.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
What don't you like about metal in your butterfly? I actually use a steel rigging carabiner with the gate oriented away from the wood. A lot of people don't like that due to the possibility (however remote) of the tree rubbing the biner just right to open it. I've heard it has happened. I like it because I don't have to feed the entire working end thru the loop.
Biners will definitely open against trees, and ropes.
 

chiselbit

Well-Known Member
I was envisioning with chiselbits post clipping the karabiner above the bowline bend then attaching the rope under your climb system, decend to next work station, pull bite down, cut repeat. I maybe wrong. if im correct all thats needed is the connector. Tom, why a screwlink instead of karabiner?jw
That’s it. Just grab your climb line under your hitch and clip it into the biner, keep it slack so you can descend to next cutting station and then pull the whole thing down. Fast fast fast. And the biner isn’t part of the life support, it’s just behind your bowline as something to pull it down with
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
@SamNQ

For many years I used a large ISC HMS style biner...Mongoose???...for choking. No problems ever. Then a discussion started about bridging the gate, even when it was placed up, and possibly damaging the gate. The simple solution was to substitute a steel Maillon-Rapide delta. Simple and inexpensive change that greatly reduced any Oops Factor. No down side either. No worries about cross loading etc.

Two additions to the Delta. Add a piece of old Big Shot tubing to the threaded sleeve. It adds a bit of diameter and gives your fingers a little more grip to tighten but not over tighten. I gave it a test...After tighten ing using the rubber sleeve I try to unscrew it by hand..I never can. To get a sense of how much I can tighten I use an open end wrench to unscrew. I can't measure torque but I've done enough mechanical work in my life to have a feel that its just enough.

@jb holdway was the first one that I saw share the wrench solution for screw links. Find the right size combination wrench cut off the open end and deburr. Then slip the open end over the screwlink and leave it captured like a key on a ring! Brilliant!
 
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