Soil Treatments for Drought Stress

Morice

Member
As some might know, those of us in the South are dealing with drought and in some areas it is extreme...

So I was just curious what everybody's feelings and techniques are for combating extreme drought stress in landscape trees?
 

Morice

Member
And I'm not interested hearing something like;

You should fertilize your trees with something like 27-9-9
 

KyLimbwalker

Well-Known Member
I would think: test soil for compaction ---> if compacted, then airknife, adding compost and mulch. If no compaction, then still mulch.
 

treegazer

Member
Yeah what he said.

Soil decompaction/aeration and adding organic matter to the soil/ root zone.

Vertical mulching on a 2' minimum grid in the root zone could be highly beneficial.
Radial trenching and amending with compost or tilling(with air) the entire area down to 18" and amending with compost.

And mulch as much of the root zone as the client will go for. If you can convince them to go to the drip line then Hallelujah.
 

Morice

Member
What about organic treatments for those special GREEN clients?

Cambistat is great though, I just need a little something more right now or in addition to.

I also love using the Air Knife but it's just not always practical due to highly manicured landscapes, lawns, etc.
 

BostonBull

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
What about organic treatments for those special GREEN clients?

Cambistat is great though, I just need a little something more right now or in addition to.

I also love using the Air Knife but it's just not always practical due to highly manicured landscapes, lawns, etc.

[/ QUOTE ]

Mychorrizae Fungi..........
 

Morice

Member
Right on, I'm also doing Mychorrizae innoculations, sounds like we are on the same page...just looking for ideas, thanks.
 

dhuffnmu

Member
Just a question out of couriousity. How long does it take until you start seeing the benefits of using Mychorrizae innoculations.

Also where are you guys purchasing this from?

Thanks.
 

BostonBull

New Member
I would say 1-2 months. You need to give them time to attach themselves to the root system and grow.

We use Bio pack, which is made by Plant Health Care. We buy it locally.
 

Eric_E

New Member
I'm with Tom on this one...H2O.

I think that's pretty GREEN.

I would sell the service like this:

1- Weed control with round-up as far out to the drip line as the client will allow.

2- Soaker hose of the seeping varity and some type of timer to set regular watering.

3- measure actual water amount for 1 hour watering time and set up watering schedule dependent on the tree needs.

4- Mulch

5- inspection schedule

That's got to be worth some $ for the right client and the right tree.
 

dhuffnmu

Member
Thanks BostonBull. Like I said I was a little courious about how long it took for it to attach itself to the roots.
 

Morice

Member
[ QUOTE ]
I read the title of this thread, and thought
"Duhhh, WATER."


TS

[/ QUOTE ]

Well for one thing we are currently under Stage Four water restrictions, and I had done some deep root watering this summer before the water restrictions got even worse...great mind things alike!

Watering right now is just a temporary bandage though in my humble opinion, due to the the fact that Charlotte had something like 18" below average rainfall for 2007. But I understand your logic completely, but I'm looking for something that aides in water retention.

 

Marc_H

New Member
You might look at the Rain Bird Irrigation Supplement if there is no other way to get actual water.

Expect to see an increase in insect problems. I would set up a pest monitoring program for your customers.
 

phasthound

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
As some might know, those of us in the South are dealing with drought and in some areas it is extreme...

So I was just curious what everybody's feelings and techniques are for combating extreme drought stress in landscape trees?

[/ QUOTE ]

Compost, vermicompost, humates, kelp, etc.
 
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