Simple throwline stainless-steel wire mod...

TREEfool

Active Member
#1
Hey guys! I am too lazy to do this to my throwlines but when a good friend of mine showed me this I was pretty impressed. Basically he takes a stainless steel keychain wire with a screw-release and hitches it to the end of his throwline. He then covers that in heat shrink.

What this does is allows him to quickly change from his throwbag to climbing rope. It also makes the end of your throwline much less susceptible to friction breaks and I am guessing that the addition of heat shrink to the end of the throwline helps it slide over limbs with thick and burly bark a lot easier.

If this exists already in some pre-made form could you guys send me a link? I watch quite a lot of tree climbing videos from AerialTraveler and RichMumford but haven't seen this before.

Here is a short clip of how it works: (and yes that is his kitchen table, his house has a climbing wall on the outside and his living room has two portaledges hanging in it, haha):

 

TREEfool

Active Member
#3
Cool! I forget how you once said to get the hole through the end of the rope. Heat up a nail and melt it through?
I use a nail and a butane torch. But it is really easy to get stuck in the rope when it cools down and "welds" inside.

My friend Devon uses an electric knife that heats up. His method works way better ;)
 

RopeShield

Well-Known Member
#4
What kind are you using?
Key chain type doesnt hold up worth a poop. Threaded bit just yanks out off the wire. Also
Started to fray with my claw hammer hanging off it on a hook in the truck. Stick ya in the finger. (y). I wouldn't bother.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
#7
I agree with the slippery clove hitch...I don't have to cut the end often at all. He must be trying it on differently. That doesn't look much quicker either - and probably more difficult in cold weather. Creative, to be sure...I just can't see it improving they way I've been doing it.
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
#9
Hey guys! I am too lazy to do this to my throwlines but when a good friend of mine showed me this I was pretty impressed. Basically he takes a stainless steel keychain wire with a screw-release and hitches it to the end of his throwline. He then covers that in heat shrink.

What this does is allows him to quickly change from his throwbag to climbing rope. It also makes the end of your throwline much less susceptible to friction breaks and I am guessing that the addition of heat shrink to the end of the throwline helps it slide over limbs with thick and burly bark a lot easier.

If this exists already in some pre-made form could you guys send me a link? I watch quite a lot of tree climbing videos from AerialTraveler and RichMumford but haven't seen this before.

Here is a short clip of how it works: (and yes that is his kitchen table, his house has a climbing wall on the outside and his living room has two portaledges hanging in it, haha):

Sweet idea @FluffyFish. Thanks for sharing. I've never seen the idea before. Would this be the correct keychain holder cable thingy?

https://www.amazon.com/20pcs-Stainl...pID=51jlTbD71OL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
#10
For 20 years or more I've tied a bowline large enough to slip through the ring, around the bag and ending up with a girth hitch on the ring. The bowline stays in the line.

It's very quick and easy.

As for wear on the line right at the bowline: I like it. It becomes a fail point for stuck throw balls.

While I think the OP of this thread is presenting an interesting idea, I feel it is not as good as the basic system I've used for decades, and certainly more expensive.

Long live FluffyFish!
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
#13
I used to keep a loop in the line to, but every now and then the loop would get stuck pulling it out. The slippery clove hitch takes seconds to tie and leaves me with a free end on the line.
In over thirty years I don't believe I've ever had the loop stuck. I also use the loop to attach the rope to the throwline. To each their own. It's not that big of a loop plus forces keep the loop pulled pretty tight. You'd be much more likely to have the ring on the throw bag get stuck on a nub.
 
#15
In over thirty years I don't believe I've ever had the loop stuck. I also use the loop to attach the rope to the throwline. To each their own. It's not that big of a loop plus forces keep the loop pulled pretty tight. You'd be much more likely to have the ring on the throw bag get stuck on a nub.
Your idea of the bowline/girth seems safe, simple, and speedy. I'm going to give it a shot!
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
#16
I just tie an eye big enough to girth hitch over the bag,

AND large enough to barely clove hitch the rope, off-center on the loop,

for a clove hitch-half-hitch x4 connection for rope-to-throw line.

Girth hitch-half-hitch X4 slipped out on me with the tied eye.

If anyone has a particularly nasty tree that wants to grab the loop, I can see the benefit of tying the bag with a knot, and have done so a lot. I don't need to complicate it for the groundie, though. Makes it a bit more delegate-able, with one less complication in the system.

As well, my 6yo daughter can hitch/ unhitch her throwline more simply than tying. Soon she will be teaching the new groundies some ropework.
 

TREEfool

Active Member
#17

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
#18
I like the nail hole idea. If I can pass a throw line with tied eye through, and hitch over the end of the rope, it will pull cleanly, I'm thinking, in my armchair.
 

CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
#19
A long bowline to girth the throw weight works great

Another option that I learned at my last BCTCC was to simply tie a girth hitch directly onto the throwbag ring, with a short tail. If the bag gets stuck, you can pull hard on the rope and the girth hitch will actually roll out, releasing the throwbag and your throwline. It works a treat in a tree where your spider sense is eyeing up the second throw cube before you even open up the first
 
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