Saw Won’t Cut Straight

I run a Husqvarna 562XP and absolutely love this saw. Recently it started cutting crooked. I took it to the work bench, sharpened the chain, dressed the bar, took it back out and still cut crooked. Bought a new bar and chain, still cut crooked! I can’t really think what else could be causing this issue. The saw isn’t that old, I’ve been running saws for years and have never had a problem like this. I even took the saw to one of Ken Palmers felling courses and he couldn’t figure out why it wouldn’t cut straight. My last thought is maybe the anti- vibration system is damaged? It doesn’t appear to be, but I have not tried replacing it. Any ideas? Thanks for your help.
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Right chain for the bar? Anti vibe or mounting shouldnt cause your problems..

#1 miss filed chain
# 2 rakers
# 3 warn bar
#4 bent bar
#5 dull chain

Beyond that I'm clueless.. good luck
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
If you put put a new chain on it... not a sharpened one, a new one... does it pull to one side immediately, or does it take awhile?

Aftermarket dogs on the saw?

Chances are that the chain is hitting something... dog bolt, etc. and dulling one side. If so, you should be able to see the wear by cleaning the saw very well and looking very closely at everything that the chain comes close to. Remove the bar/chain for inspection, and look around under the sidecover and where the chain enters/exits.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
I learned the almost all crooked cuts are from mis sharpened depth gauges. As long as both sides of the chain shave off the same amount of wood the chain willcut straight.

We all know this too. Setting aside chain damage think of a saw that is 'wood dull'. No dirt cutting

The saw cuts straight even if its dull. Then,sharpen the chain. cuts crooked.What happened? We can see that shiny chrome on top of the cutter and the nice curve on the front face. Looks sharp! What isn't 'seen' is mismatched depth gauges.

That whole issue went away once I started using the Pferd system with the built in flat file.
 

Pelorus

Well-Known Member
I run a Husqvarna 562XP and absolutely love this saw. Recently it started cutting crooked. Bought a new bar and chain, still cut crooked.
The fundamental problem here is that you are operating a.......{{{{shudder}}}}Husqvarna and not a Stihl. This error in judgement, although monumental, can be cured.
That aside, I've noticed the depth guages (aka rakers) on new chains to frequently be high and need lowering right from the get go. Take your bars, both new and old, and set em on a nice flat surface like the top of a tablesaw, or pane of glass. See if they are warped, ie. they dont lie flat and you can rock them a bit. It happens.
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
The fundamental problem here is that you are operating a.......{{{{shudder}}}}Husqvarna and not a Stihl. This error in judgement, although monumental, can be cured.
Certainly not buying a Stihl! :reloco:

We find most crooked cuts are found on our saws we cut stumps with, normally 2 main causes, a bur on the bar or one side if the chain (normally the down side) being duller. But both these you say you have corrected by a New (unused) chain and a new bar. One other frustrator we’ve seen (not so much recently) is inconsistency in the gullet shape. If your good side filing has the gullets cleaned out/rounded properly and your bad side does not essentially you have the same effect as mismatched depth gauges. One gullet can hole (exaggeration) 1/2 a cubic inch of chip the other side may only hold 1/4. Essentially stopping it from cutting as soon as it gets full (no where for the chip to go). I have pictures of a laid back tooth and a proper gullet somewhere but I don’t think I can find them (several recent computer changes). Knowing exactly what each part or space of the chain does is great when trying to diagnose a problem like this.
The next direction I would look at goes back 19 years in my career when I was a wee lad. My Forman told me I was holding the saw wrong! Bull dookie I said, he came over grabbed the saw and started a new cut. Flat as flat could be. :eek: I guess I had been putting a twisting force on the saw to turn the bar and chain in the wood.
 

Rob Stafari

Member
Assuming the new bar and chain you put on are a correct match to the saw's setup... that leaves you with bar mount, drive sprocket, bearing, crank, and operator. Take the bar off, give it a healthy compressed air bath. Pull the chain guides, brake covers, clutch drum, and blow everything out. Inspect bearing and land on crank for wear. Grease bearing if good and reassemble. Make sure chain is running even around sprocket and not hitting anything. Even if the cause of the problem isn't there, your saw will thank you. Then make a test cut in clean wood. No dogs, just bar on log, new chain pulling itself through. If the problem wasn't found anywhere else, we are left with the possibility of you applying some sort of twist to bar like the flying squirrel and operator error.
 

ghostice

Well-Known Member
Historical records in fact show this was actually ships manifest problem - it wasn't until miles from shore that the first mate realized that the two Huskies on the manifest were in fact the four legged kind. Son of a . . . . .

Sorry, it's the Scotch . . . .

On a more serious note, any time I've found myself cutting arcs, it's been either teeth on one side not filed the same as the other side or the raker heights, as has been said above. Our 562's are workhorses running .058" gauge chain - I find they stretch less than .050". Have you checked the gauge? Not running an .050" chain in a .058" gauge bar, if that's even possible? Don't know. You can get both gauges for the 562's.
 

Bango Skank

Well-Known Member
Not running an .050" chain in a .058" gauge bar, if that's even possible? Don't know. You can get both gauges for the 562's.
Definitely possible to do and it could be the culprit.

I'd like to know if both those plastic inserts are in the clutch cover. They can go flying if you feel the need to use 150 psi air to clean saws.
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
The fundamental problem here is that you are operating a.......{{{{shudder}}}}Husqvarna and not a Stihl. This error in judgement, although monumental, can be cured.
That aside, I've noticed the depth guages (aka rakers) on new chains to frequently be high and need lowering right from the get go. Take your bars, both new and old, and set em on a nice flat surface like the top of a tablesaw, or pane of glass. See if they are warped, ie. they dont lie flat and you can rock them a bit. It happens.
Lol...so trueeee
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
The fundamental problem here is that you are operating a.......{{{{shudder}}}}Husqvarna and not a Stihl. This error in judgement, although monumental, can be cured.
That aside, I've noticed the depth guages (aka rakers) on new chains to frequently be high and need lowering right from the get go. Take your bars, both new and old, and set em on a nice flat surface like the top of a tablesaw, or pane of glass. See if they are warped, ie. they dont lie flat and you can rock them a bit. It happens.
Lol...so trueeee
 
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