Rope bridge, finally. Now what knot?

samsquatch

Active Member
Finally turned my trusty old Cougar into a rope bridge saddle. 1/2" Samson Arbormaster in a pair of RE TriRig paws. I'm using double-overhands on either side now. What knots does everyone here like?
 

climbstihl

Well-Known Member
Double overhand is what all saddles with stopper knot bridges use that I'm aware of. Treemotion, Sentinel, Denali, Onyx, Monkey Beaver to name a few.
 
If you want an adjustable rope bridge, I would recommending installing a 'Safeguard' (made by Madrock USA). Unlike the CT Roll n Lock, it uses a smooth cam that will not damage the host rope material if shock loaded. Furthermore, it allows full adjustment in both directions even while under load. It will also work with a generous range of rope diameters.

The 'Safeguard' has other applications that go way beyond mere 'rope bridges' in harnesses. Surprising that the tree climbing/arbor industry hasn't adopted it more widely...
 

SeanRuel

Active Member
I use double fisherman's on one side and the hitchhiker knot on the other. Let's me untie if needed and has never moved on me at all.
 

JeffGu

Well-Known Member
...other applications that go way beyond...

CAMPSAVER carries both the Safeguard and the Lifeguard. The Safeguard is a Lifeguard assembled without the internal spring. Lifeguard is better belay device, Safeguard better for rescue/rigging uses. They are very nice devices. They won't work on ropes over 11mm but that's their only real downside, IMO.
 
JeffGu, although drifting off the original posters topic:

The 'Safeguard' works on 11.3mm diameter rope quite well (but I am splitting hairs over 0.3mm difference...but just pointing out that 11.0mm is not the absolute limit). In fact, it also works quite well down to 8.0mm diameter cord... although going down to 8.0mm or sub 8.0mm means that the device will likely sever the rope sheath in a fall-arrest situation (ie at factor 1 or higher). Richard Delaney has extensively tested the Safeguard on Sterling 8.0mm cord and the sheath is damaged in fall-arrest drop tests. This is due to its instantaneous 'catch'.
I have extensively tested the Safeguard with Beal 'Opera' 8.5mm dynamic rope for employment as a 'PAL' (personal adjustable lanyard) in all industrial work at height, rope access, and vertical rescue applications for personal edge safety. No problem - because unlike Sterling 8.0mm cord, Beal Opera is EN892 certified for fall-arrest.

I also use the Safeguard in tension guy lines to stabilise proprietary rescue frames such as the Arizona Vortex (in all configurations).

Also, one should point out that the 'Lifeguard' would be unsuitable if installed in a harness rope bridge. The 'Safeguard' is not intended to be used a climbing belay device.

Safeguard also works well as a flip-line / pole rope adjuster - can achieve positioning down to millimeter accuracy.

For me personally, it is remarkable on account of its tiny footprint and weight.
Good things come in small packages!
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
It allows easy one handed length adjustment, even when loaded. The spool has a bend radius of about 38 mm, compared to the typical 10-12 mm of rings.
 

NailerB

Active Member
This is looks like a nice compact arrangement, if using a Safeguard.
View attachment 62252
I am sorry but I do not understand the purpose of this set up and would appreciate an explanation. I'm assuming that the red device is an adjuster of some type and it is adjusting the bridge? Maybe the pic is confusing me but the bridge doesn't look to be 16"? Help please.
 

NailerB

Active Member
Now if you want to o one more step, put a CT Roll-n-lock on a 6-7 foot piece of Tri-Tech and you have an adjustable bridge. Great for Chest plates on open ascents.
It also works very well if your using it in conjunction with a secondary bridge while using a power ascender, I hook the secondary to the ascender and set my adjustable so that my Akimbo is above everything by a few inches. I also like to let the bridge way out on a limb walk return, If I keep a little weight in the saddle I just need to pull the tail and I don't have to clean up slack.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
The red device is the Lifeguard, the cousin of the Safeguard, which Agent Smith suggested. The picture was for demonstrating how the Safeguard could work on a bridge. The bridge is short and has a fixed length, my length adjuster is the spool with a hitch and short length of rope.
 

NailerB

Active Member
So if you were going to actually employ an adjustable bridge you would have a 6-7' rope in place of what's shown? If so I get that part now. Now if we can go on to part 2. What is the purpose of the other conglomeration that is on your bridge, never seen anything like it. If you hvae time I'm interested in hearing about it.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
You’re correct on part 1, the second is a wooden prototype ring that gives 38mm of bend radius. Tied to it is a Sticht Hitch, that has a short cord for length adjustment, which can be adjusted one handed, while weighted.
380F63DD-0C56-4665-978B-FAA13CA47FC0.jpeg
 

John@TreeXP

Well-Known Member
Please note, this post refers to the Safeguard, or Lifeguard. It's the one colored black, not red and I honestly forgot which is which.

I own both a Safeguard and a RollNLock. Comparing the Safeguard to a Grigri is a close approximation, although the Safeguard is only slightly smaller. Using a Safeguard to replace the RollNLock as a bridge adjuster may seem like a good idea, from a shock loading standpoint, but there are other drawbacks, including the added bulk of the Safeguard and the way rope can slide through the device when it's not properly loaded. On my 2019 Sequoia SRT saddle the Safeguard would either need to connect directly onto the D-ring as shown in the above photo, or require using a locking carabiner to secure it to the D-ring, whereas the RollNLock fits behind the D-ring with a small zip-tie in a more streamlined way.

Until I see specific drop tests showing the possible adverse impact on a rope bridge using a RollNLock when shock loaded, I will continue to rely on Richard's pull test video results, which shows the rope bridge failing in a similar way, either with or without the RollNLock.

Because the Safeguard isn't spring loaded, rope slides through when it's not weight loaded. If the Safeguard had a spring loaded cam that secured an unweighted rope, then it would be a great tree climbing tool. As a lanyard adjuster it's OK on DdRT, but when using a Safeguard on a lanyard in a SRT system for vertical descents, it's just way too jerky and fragile for my taste.
 
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