Rigging a 200 Foot Zipline

moss

Well-Known Member
#5
Super job! Hilarious! Great cameo by "The Kid"!

I ran a 220' zip for a yard party over the summer, I anchored the bottom similar to the way you did except I do all the tensioning at the top of the zip, redirect down through a block and secure on a Portawrap. First saw that setup built by Forest at the '08 rec climbing rendezvous in Atlanta, Tom D. knows Forest very well I think. I attach a light 4:1 MA system to the ring/prussik on the line just below the block to periodically tighten the line, heavy riders stretch it out a little. Once I MA tighten it's locked off with the Portawrap.

When I'm testing the setup I lower myself down the zip on a rope anchored to the tree, that way I avoid the inevitable dirt bath on the first try. No matter how tight you make it first time it's never enough ;-)

Here's the top side of the zip from this summer... I have two ropes hung one on each side of the ladder, zip rider climbs the ladder on rope while I ascend next to them. They take out the slack on a multicender as they ascend (which I coach them on as they climb). Rider is clipped into a Grigri on a short rope attached to the trolley. I don't take chances (ground clearance) on different weight potentially drunk riders, at the end they're still high off the ground, a facilitator stays there, grabs the tail of the short rope and instructs them on lowering off the end of the zip. The orange sling on the tree has a Wichard snap release on the end which I attach to the trolley. I have them pull the trigger on the Wichard when they're ready to fly.

 
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moss

Well-Known Member
#6
And yes we've had some crazy incidents at climber gatherings when I've made the mistake of letting someone do the first test ride freestyle. No one has been injured but... as much as experienced climbers want to be the test dummy, terrible idea ;-) Yaaaaaah!!!, thwack. "You ok?" "Yeah I'm ok".
-AJ
 

Raven

Well-Known Member
#7
Nice setup Moss, I like the Grigri so they can get down or get slack when they reach the bottom - could a RADS system work there as well so going up the ladder all they have to do is pull the tail to ascend?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
#8
@moss

"Dirt bath". Hahahahh

I use the largest diameter rope that's compatible with pulleys. Less stretch. Retensioning at the top with a piggy back MA is the best
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#9
@moss

"Dirt bath". Hahahahh

I use the largest diameter rope that's compatible with pulleys. Less stretch. Retensioning at the top with a piggy back MA is the best
Yeah I like a 1/2" line, but didn't have the length needed for this one. Ended up using 11mm PMI EZ-Bend, it worked but was way less than ideal.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#10
Nice setup Moss, I like the Grigri so they can get down or get slack when they reach the bottom - could a RADS system work there as well so going up the ladder all they have to do is pull the tail to ascend?
The only problem with the RADS is since it's 3:1 they'll have to work too hard taking out the slack, too much rope to move through the system while they're going up the ladder. Since I can climb faster/easier on a multicender then they can ascend a ladder I took out the slack manually for most of them as they went up. Some were rope naturals and handled climbing a ladder and taking out slack themselves very well.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#11
There are nice devices in industrial climbing that self advance while going up a ladder, I don't happen to have one :-(
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#12
Didn't mean to hijack the thread, love Freefallin's innovations and videos, zip lines and stationary rope traverses are one of my favorite subjects ;-)
 

FreeFallin

Well-Known Member
#16
My question is has anyone done a controlled zipline traverse at height?

And by controlled I mean either using a braking device on the traverse rope or what moss described as a leash to lower yourself with.

I see horizontal traverses all the time or the monkey swing style where you slack the first line until you swing to the other tree, I don' see much zipping though.

Edit : I ask because I grew up reading Edgar Rice Burrows, and those mental images of flying through the upper terraces of the jungle Tarzan style are hard to get out of my head.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#17
We've done some uncontrolled zipline traverses at height ;-) I'll have to dig for the video. I did a controlled descent on the zip first to verify a safe path through tree tops. That proved totally faulty since I weigh nothing, the rider after me crashed into a limb that I passed over easily, he was not hurt, too much ;-) We'll be doing that again soon at Ian Sporre's annual Connecticut winter rec climb in January.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#18
Richard Mumford proved that a Rope Runner works very well descending on a tensioned/angled line, I don't think we know the full parameters of that technique, for example is there a point where the line is too tight and the Runner stops working (or not).
 

moss

Well-Known Member
#19
Found it, 2014 Connecticut Winter Rec Climb, Kieran (Buzzer name KYAPLE I think) insisted on doing the first uncontrolled ride at night, it was awesome, we heard YAAAAA!!! then he stopped, way too soon, then he climbed over the limb he collided with and finished the run, descended down from the tree at the end of the zip all smiles at his crazily awesome run.

This the next morning, from the camera perspective it's difficult to get how good the ride is but that's how it goes...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturejournal/11949964455/

-AJ
 
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FreeFallin

Well-Known Member
#20
Richard Mumford proved that a Rope Runner works very well descending on a tensioned/angled line, I don't think we know the full parameters of that technique, for example is there a point where the line is too tight and the Runner stops working (or not).

Hmmm, I feel an Akimbo test coming on. And if Santa got that bribe, I should be able to do a BdB test soon as well.
 
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