Renting a treemek for the first time

islandedge

Well-Known Member
Now you don't have to always use v-cuts, especially if you have 2 slings it would balance it much better. However making the v-cut creates a shelf and allows the wood to sit in place and keeps it from kicking out at you. Keep in mind, I'm the one making the cut and running the crane so it's just a general practice that I've learned to cut the shelf on my side to keep it from becoming violent like you said happen on your removal.20190910_134322.jpg
 

Jehinten

Well-Known Member
I like that cut, and will give it a try next time around. Unfortunately with cranes I'm starting from scratch on how and what cuts to make and with no formal crane training. I know it's not the best practice but I've been watching videos online to see different cuts and the reaction of those cuts but it seems that most videos only really go into detail on the brush picks and skim the mundane trunk picks which with the treemek is the only cuts that I'll be making.
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
Bigger wood I do tend to cut straight through. Just use 2 slings to prevent tipping and pinching...and if you have it pretensioned correctly it just slightly pops up and floats there straight above the stem (the best is when it is only an inch or less).

A traditional overlapping snap cut doesn't work well with knuckle booms IMO, takes too much force to break the snap. V, Shelf, and straight through seems to work best (sometimes a very slight back cut first with no real overlap.

btw- if you had 2 10' slings, you could have connected them with a shackle to give you 2 20' slings ;-)
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
Your correct, I usually run shackles if I'm doing eye to eye slings. I was running two 20 foot endless slings
I see. I tend to be the other way, lol. Shackles on the endless, but none on the eye to eye slings.

My eye to eye are only 6 and 12 feet, so I don't mind not having shackles on them. My endless ate 20' too.
 

islandedge

Well-Known Member
I see. I tend to be the other way, lol. Shackles on the endless, but none on the eye to eye slings.

My eye to eye are only 6 and 12 feet, so I don't mind not having shackles on them. My endless ate 20' too.
Realistically Shackles on everything would be best to prevent premature wear
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
I never ever do snap cuts for crane work no matter what kind of crane. It's a dynamic loading moment and thats not good. V Cut, Shelf cut, straight through or cut till the kerf starts to close and then pull out and cut the strap on the opposite side. Knuckle booms have so much boom deflection, a snap cut could result in hundreds of pounds of preload being added just to make the snap. Then the dynamic loading cycle begins and the boom rattles around waiting for the bouncing to stop. Sounds like the operator isn't too worried about his boom if he's pulling so hard the hook is horizontal. Just hope he doesn't snap the boom off on your job site. I'm so very particular with the climbers I work with. Just an educations thing. Crane work is crane work but a kboom is a totally different animal and saw skills are paramount when using one. Due to the deflection of the boom you can try to muscle a piece with the boom and create a deadly situation.
 

JE Chop Nash

New Member
Shelf cut the big stuff. Some k boom guys just shelf cut everything. I’m one of them. My business partner is more of a v cut guy with some shelf cuts. Snap cuts...avoid other than maybe some long horizontals.
 

CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
Shelf cut the big stuff. Some k boom guys just shelf cut everything. I’m one of them. My business partner is more of a v cut guy with some shelf cuts. Snap cuts...avoid other than maybe some long horizontals.
On big long horizontals that are well-balanced, a bypass cut may be more beneficial ... even then ... no good reason to not do the aforementioned shelf cut
 
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