Quik-jet Air, FSeries Tree IV, or BioForest EcoJect??

I'm planning on investing in a trunk injection system, primarily to treat red oaks here in Maine for brown tail. In the past I have used Mauget and Tree Tech single use capsule injectors with varying results with uptake. I am totally willing to spend the money on a more efficient system, as it will quickly pay off. I'm considering the BioForest EcoJect, Arborjet Quik-jet Air or FSeries Tree IV. I'm leaning toward the Quik-jet Air, as it seems like a powerful tool and relatively simple/efficient to use. I would appreciate any advice from experience with these systems, especially with regards to treatment uptake and overall efficiency. Thanks!
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
I'm planning on investing in a trunk injection system, primarily to treat red oaks here in Maine for brown tail. In the past I have used Mauget and Tree Tech single use capsule injectors with varying results with uptake. I am totally willing to spend the money on a more efficient system, as it will quickly pay off. I'm considering the BioForest EcoJect, Arborjet Quik-jet Air or FSeries Tree IV. I'm leaning toward the Quik-jet Air, as it seems like a powerful tool and relatively simple/efficient to use. I would appreciate any advice from experience with these systems, especially with regards to treatment uptake and overall efficiency. Thanks!
I’ve been using Arborjet quick-jet air the last 5 years for EAB, plus to treat other trees for various diseases, very easy to use, maintain and has been problem free. Arborjet has very good directions also for all its products.
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
A neat trick to avoid the hassles with ArborJet equipment is to just use their plugs and then find syringes with the same diameter as their injection needles.
 
I’ve been using Arborjet quick-jet air the last 5 years for EAB, plus to treat other trees for various diseases, very easy to use, maintain and has been problem free. Arborjet has very good directions also for all its products.
How would you say successful uptake is with the quick-jet air versus other systems, especially when conditions are drier, colder or hotter than ideal? I'm just thinking of needing to cram projects into the short season that we have here in Maine for brown tail injection. Thanks
 

JD3000

Well-Known Member
Quick jet didn't work for me when it gets sunny and warm. IVs are slow but steady unless it gets, again, sunny and warm.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ATH

ATH

Well-Known Member
I agree JD that is the case with QuickJet. But I think QuickJet Air is supposed to do better. I wonder how much pressure it is a good idea to push with though? If the plug is not set perfect, you can damage some cambium right around the plug (or so I've heard :inocente: ). With higher pressure, there would certainly be more damage...
 
Last edited:

deevo

Well-Known Member
Quick jet didn't work for me when it gets sunny and warm. IVs are slow but steady unless it gets, again, sunny and warm.
Wow that’s surprising that’s the most optimal time to inject, sunny days, when trees transpiring the most, should be done before 2:30-3 pm for best results, I’ve injected over 3200 ash trees, all doing well no casualties.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
How would you say successful uptake is with the quick-jet air versus other systems, especially when conditions are drier, colder or hotter than ideal? I'm just thinking of needing to cram projects into the short season that we have here in Maine for brown tail injection. Thanks
Ideally from the training I’ve taken online from Arborjet is sunny days, warmer temps the trees are transporting and pulling the product up, but for each of their product the instructions should be followed very closely for best results, I replied to JD3000 already but we’ve done over 3200 ash trees with Imajet and all are doing great so far, even in heavily infested EAB areas. I’m not familiar with the brown tail injections though as we aren’t dealing with that in Ontario. But a few of my guys used the bio forest product before and agreed arbor jet systems are way better to work with and uptakes faster for what we are doing, as well as cleaning of the system, you don’t have any canisters to cleanup at the end of the day, and getting their insecticide all over you, yes we wear gloves for injecting. Also if you have any questions, Arborjet is easy to get a hold of and will answer most questions promptly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ATH

ATH

Well-Known Member
Warm days are good. Hot dry days are tough.

Also, Ima-jet is also a LOT easier to inject than TREE-äge (especially the original...don't use that, go with the TREE-äge G4).

I agree that ArborJet customer service is great when I've needed them.
 
Anyone have any experience with the higher pressure FSeries Tree IV? Looks like I'd likely be injecting Ace-Jet for brown tail infestation. The dosage range for the average size trees I'd be treating runs about 50 - 100 mLs for injection, and 75 - 200 mLs for infusion (IV). I'm just wondering if a higher pressure IV type system would be more efficient in this application, even than the rapid fire Quick-jet Air at 5mLs a shot? Thoughts?
 
Why not basal Lepitect? No drilling...
That could be a good option. Do you have any first hand experience with how affective is it when soil injected? I do a lot of work in shore land zone where spray and soil injection are against code, so I would still need other options. But, it could still be a good item in the quiver.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
I've had great results with lepitect uptake. That is a good option where it is permitted and looks reasonable. Too close to water I wouldn't as it is super water soluble.

Get several zip lock bags and an ammo box to store open, but unused packages in. It stinks. I smell it every time I open the cabinet and it is in 3 bags plus the ammo box.
 
Top