Pruning Queen Palms

#1
Hello Everyone,

I am a recreational tree climber who has a small rental property in Orange County, California where I maintain my own (4) Queen Palm trees. Prior to purchasing any tree climbing equipment I have taken several ISA on line courses and purchased several books on proper tree pruning techniques and climbing techniques. I am still very much a beginner as I do not do this everyday.

Up until now I have been pruning my Queen Palm trees with a 24' extension ladder, saddle, lanyard and silky saw. The tree has grown just above my reach.
My next approach will be to shoot a line over the tree and ascend the tree using a base anchor.

I am wondering if there are any Arborists out there who prune Queen Palms this way? I have seen several local tree companies and Companies on Youtube ascend these trees using Spikes and lanyards.

Spiking the tree would be easier, faster possible less time consuming but this may lead to infection and unsightly holes in the trunk. I would love to hear from any of you pro's out there who do this for a living.
 
#2
Yep - works great, just make sure line lies over crown of palm and over at least two strong healthy fronds. If the palm looks infected with something and fronds droop I would hesitate climbing this way and use spurs, or girth your line using running figure eight as tie-in-point and push hitch up palm trunk with a long pole before climbing up srt...

Use polebelt to unweight lifeline enough to move lifeline out of way to prune adjacent to lifeline (a silky hand saw can cut through rope almost as fast as a chainsaw...) .

To take pressure off rope to prune fronds adjacent to lifeline on opposite side to the ascent I take up a 6-8' line that has a loop on one end and girth hitch on some strong fronds, and clip into your foot ascender to take your weight (with pole belt around trunk, or over other fronds), and unweight enough off srt rope (without disconnecting from rope) to push aside base-tied rope and prune without risk of cutting lifeline - found this is faster than re-positioning lifeline and much easier. You can stand on other side of palm no problems with this method...
 
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#3
Chaplain,

Thank you for your response! Using a running figure eight and pushing it up with a pole would be my first choice, simply using the hook end of a pole saw (minus the saw blade) would be easy and ideal. That way my life line won't be buried inside the fronds somewhere. Also, bringing up an 8' line to use as a foot hold would be extremely helpful! (more stability, another attachment point)

My sincere thanks and gratitude for sharing your ideas/expertise, David
 
#4
Take a length of rope and on one end make a loop for girth hitching around the trunk. On the other end tie a double loop figure 8 / bunny ears or whatever to get 2 loops. You can then have both feet in the loops around the trunk. Something like the posted video here
 
#5
Take a length of rope and on one end make a loop for girth hitching around the trunk. On the other end tie a double loop figure 8 / bunny ears or whatever to get 2 loops. You can then have both feet in the loops around the trunk. Something like the posted video here
Another great idea! I view a lot of Richard Mumford's climbing videos, haven't seen this one before. Thank you for sending it my way!
 
#7
I already have a pole saw, but I am not able to clean and prune as effectively as climbing it. I usually try to cut the PODS out before they spout and make a mess. I have to climb it in order to do this. Just my preference, I guess.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
#9
I already have a pole saw, but I am not able to clean and prune as effectively as climbing it. I usually try to cut the PODS out before they spout and make a mess. I have to climb it in order to do this. Just my preference, I guess.
I hear ya; polesaw does not work well on pod stalks, so a pole pruner is needed for those.
 
#10
If the pods are nestled into the crown tightly then they are difficult.

But if can access one side of one you can do a partial cut into the side of the pod or podstalk, and then grab the tip of the pod with the tip of the manual polesaw and pull down hard (often with large proportion of your body weight) and bend the pod down, then cut the rest of the stalk when its near horizontal...
 
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