Pros and cons of long, stock, or shorter length harness bridges

moss

Well-Known Member
#1
Starting this up to dig into why people like the bridge configurations they use. I believe that climbing technique adjustments can make anyone a more efficient/effective climber and take away the need for a longer than stock bridge. Convince me I'm wrong or simply describe what you like in a bridge and why. Thx!
-AJ
 

John@TreeXP

Active Member
#2
I like the long and short rope bridge. Long for when I'm not ascending. I like it short when I'm ascending, keeping everything as tight and compact as possible. The short rope bridge is more conducive to mitigating lag and sit back, while the longer bridge provides for greater maneuverability and positioning.

This then begs to question whether one may prefer the single/adjustable rope bridge, or a double rope bridge. Personally, I prefer a double rope bridge, short and long. I usually keep the primary climbing line on the short bridge, while connecting lanyards and second climbing lines to the longer rope bridge.

My setup includes a TM harness with the stock rope bridge adjusted to about 10" bite between the rings. I also use a Sterling 8mm RIT, tied using fisherman's knots, with about a 24" bite between the rings. I consider both rope bridges to be fully PPE.
 
#4
I also use a short one and I like when everything is tight to me weather I'm asending or descending. My climbing knot I like usually to be right around my chest and neck area. But again all climbers are different and I think it's all about each of us being as comfortable as we can will working.
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
#5
I'm a bridge rookie. I just recently started using a rope bridge saddle (New Tribe Aero) with 2 bridges. I found that using a short bridge on the initial SRT ascent keeps things tidy and the SRT device close to your body for tending. I've been using a second slightly longer bridge to provide more options to configure other climbing systems that are deployed in the canopy. I only have small rings on the bridges now but a large ring and swivel are going to be added in the near future to allow more room for multiple connections. The second bridge for me is more about configuring different systems in a way that doesn't create conflicts between connectors.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
#8
I have tried a couple things, one of them is using a daisy chain or pair of them attached to my bridge for additional attachment points, comes in handy some times. I mostly use a short bridge with wire core on the outside Ds and prusic adjustable 15 footer with biners on both ends on the bridge.
 

RyanCafferky

Well-Known Member
#9
I climb on a harness without a bridge (Petzl Navajo). Every time I climb on a harness with a bridge it drives me crazy because I am so used to having that central clip in point that is so close to my waist and I can always easily reach my hardware. I get why the bridge saddles are more comfortable but it just doesn’t work for me after so many years in a Navajo.
 
#10
I bought a Rook and stuck it on original bridge next to ring that came on Onyx. Just used it the other day....dang that swivel is soweeet. Doesn’t eliminate but helps reduce twisted cross loading or having to swap around orientation of diners

Question- thinking about adding longer 2nd lanyard. Any techniques for securing the rook (when not in use) so it doesn’t beat up the “twins” when it’s dangling around? Pics are even better.
 
#11
I recently added a second longer bridge to my saddle (tree access evo) and it's pretty sweet. Gives me the option of using my lower "D rings" (they're actually stitched cordage) independently of my climbing line attachment.A short and a long also keeps my friction devices staggered when I'm hanging on them so it's easier to manipulate them. The saddle also has a fixed attachment point that I use for ascent, keeps everything close and shifts my center of gravity slightly so I'm more upright
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
#12
For me, the biggest con that an extra long bridge presents is the increased risk of incidental damage. It is a critical component, why do that? I ran an adjustable bridge on my TM for a while and found that my adjustments were always the same, short or long. Because the long setting was used for only a few special setups I found that a short bridge in combination with a rope eye to eye sewn to the right length worked just as well for getting the multicender farther out.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
#13
For me, the biggest con that an extra long bridge presents is the increased risk of incidental damage. It is a critical component, why do that? I ran an adjustable bridge on my TM for a while and found that my adjustments were always the same, short or long. Because the long setting was used for only a few special setups I found that a short bridge in combination with a rope eye to eye sewn to the right length worked just as well for getting the multicender farther out.
That's kinda what I found a daisy tubular webbed daisy chain is good for too! And it has multiple hanging points for temporary rigging storage... you can hang a saw off it if you need to for odd positions etc.
 
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