prefered static climb lines.

treemanluke

New Member
SRT is new to me as a working line so I am thinking I am not alone. After just over a year of trials with a homemade Rope Wrench, a manufactured wrench, and a unicender I am looking to purchase 300 ft of static access line with the intention of also working off of it: SRT and DRT/floating anchor. Before I spend a days wages on a rope I would love to get some input! So far I have used Samson: blue streak, Poison Ivy, and sterling HTP. MY BIG QUESTION is: can 3/8 static be too hard on hitches and hands? I’ve only done accents on 3/8, and I don’t have any to run trials. What are your experiences with thinner line?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
I don't like 3/8" unless I'm doing a wilderness climb where I have to carry gear. For most of my rec climbs and all of my work climbing I use Tachyon.
 

rangerdanger

Active Member
The thinner lines can be hard on the hands, but depending if you wear gloves or not that may not be a huge factor. I've climbed on KMIII for awhile and liked it. No experience with HTP expect when I've borrowed it at comps to footlock on. Lotta good reviews tho.

If weight isn't a factor look into Samson Vortex, not a tru static line, but many ppl have commented how little stretch it has and they like it a lot. The thicker feel in the hands is great, and hitches run very smoothly with it. Also, I know Sterling makes static lines from 3/8" all the way up to 1/2" or 5/8", so maybe you could look into those if you wanted a static line, but wanted it thicker as well.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Be sure to define 'static' when you compare ropes. This is a word that isn't understood or well defined. Look at the specs of a rope that you have climbed on then look at other specs.

How much stretch at what percent of breaking strength?

There isn't a universal test or rating method for stretch so each manufacturer has a little different way of measureing it. Kinda reminds me of using the "King's Foot' to measure distance. How old is the King? Size 8 or 18?
 

lync

Member
Not a static line but yale blaze is a lightweight minimum stretch 7/16 line that I have found is good for srt ascents, but works well with knots and hitches. i was suprised how little bounce it had, but running a vt with oc eye to eye worked well. A 200 foot lenth was easily managable in taller trees.
 

Fairfield

Well-Known Member
You may want to make sure that whatever you are using for ascent and descent or what ever, is ok for that size line as well.
 
I run 3/8's Sterling HTP for access and work positioning. I use rope wrench and hand spliced ICE eye n eye. this combo works great for me. I do notice some hand fatigue if I climb on it all day but its not to bad.

My other SRT line is Velocity and to be honest, it doesn't seem much larger then the 3/8 HTP. I like them both.
 

treemanluke

New Member
I chose to go beefy, 11mm HTP. It will be for multi uses not just access , THANKS to all for the input.

Now if I only knew where I stored my 180ft comp rope.....
 

tommyh

Member
i believe i read in the sherrill catalog that if wrenching they suggest using "an arborist grade climbing line" which they use poison ivy as an example. i think they say that the hitch can do damage of some sort when "repeatedly milking the cover end-to-end." is this all true?
i want to get a new rope thats longer (200ft at least) to use when ascending with my frog walker/wrench system (same as Cary's) and also to then work the tree with my wrench.
 

SRTsteve860

Active Member
Tommy

from what i understand, if a rope is milked many times over a majority of its length (as with using a friction hitch/ device to ascend the majority of the rope, then go back down) the rope will become more static as it is milked more and more.

As the cover/kern is stretched off the end of your line, it only makes sense that there is less line remaining over the core/mantle to bear the load of the climber. For that reason, that cover already has stretch built into it, thus is more static.

A more static line will then bring about different forces to the climber and TIP if a fall or sudden load were to happen. and if the rope construction relied upon a dynamic damping effect of the line versus a high breaking strength it can spell trouble for the climber.
 

Roger_Barnett

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Not a static line but yale blaze

[/ QUOTE ]

Actually, arbo lines are every bit as static as most lines that are typically sold as "static"

Folks need to know this, as arb lines are not optimum for energy absorption, as is full dynamic lead climbing rope designed for rock and ice.

I suppose our life and lowering lines (besides the nylon Yale Polysorb) could be called semi-static, since HMWPE lines (spectra, kevlar, Vectran) are fully static, as they break at as low as 3% stretch.
 

Jeremy9

Member
I've been using 11mm HTP for everything, and it works pretty good, but I think my next rope will be a half inch static line. It will be a little easier on my hands and I think my hitch will be more reliable one it.
 

countryboypa31

Well-Known Member
Yale kernmaster is a good choice. Offering lower elongation along with knot ability. Not sure on the longevity but it's designed as a static rappel line. So I would feel its fairly durable. Look for it at the next tcia expo in Baltimore. Also I think trees tuff has looked into stocking it.
 

Adam_P

Active Member
I got a chance to do some SRT ascents on kernmaster and liked it a lot. I haven't seen it for sale anywhere but when it pops on treestuff I'll pick up 200' of it.
 

Fairfield

Well-Known Member
Climbed on 11mm PMI Pit rope today, very light! loved it will be picking up 300ft of that for sure!!
 

tommyh

Member
So to get some clarification here, would it be a good idea for me to buy a "static" KMIII (new england rope) to use for working with a rope wrench? Or would I be better off using what I normally use, say tachyon or poison ivy?
 

tommyh

Member
Another thing, when I set my poison ivy to play with my frog walk system. (I really have only used it once in a work scenario.) and I go up and down a few times, when I pull the line out of the tree the section that hangs from my "target crotch" to the ground feels very stiff. Is this due to "milking"?
 

chris_girard

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
So to get some clarification here, would it be a good idea for me to buy a "static" KMIII (new england rope) to use for working with a rope wrench? Or would I be better off using what I normally use, say tachyon or poison ivy?

[/ QUOTE ]

KMIII is a fine rope to use for SRT and in fact I’ve been using it for years. It is not a purely “static’ line.

The thing that you guys have to remember is that whatever rope that you choose to use, make sure that it meets an EN1891 Type A; sufficient energy absorption to withstand a Factor 1 fall without the need for energy absorbers.

Tachyon and PI are also fine ropes to use for SRT.
 
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