Poison Ivy Protocol

#1
I have always just attacked the stuff and washed off the best I could afterwards. I think I just have a low sensitivity to it. We did a removal a couple days ago with a big PI vine on it. Today we have one guy at the Dr. and two other who may end up going. What is the best product out there? What are some other preventative measures some of you take when dealing with PI?
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
#4
Don't move to Arkansas then, I swear it is the State Plant there. Lived there for 3 years and had it several times that sent me in for shots. First time in 40 years to have it and haven't had it since I moved away. I did the oral ivy thing there and it just didn't seem to work too well.
 

craneguy1

Well-Known Member
#5
Get it done...scrub brush and bleach when its starts to pop up...got it in my eyes once cuz i couldn't see it through all the english ivy and the wind was gusting all the sawdust into my face. Predlizone medpack it was...sheeite works wonders. Once a year only perscription though. I am now more protective of my moist wet binoculars....only got 2 ya know.
 

TreeLogic

Well-Known Member
#6
Glad to see this thread finally!

Personally, I don't think you need to do any product purchasing.

Urushiol (the allergen in Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, and Poison Sumac) is an oil. Treat it like an oil.

1) Make sure you can ID poison ivy. Hairy vine with limbs. One of the only vines with long branches. This makes it easy to recognize, even in winter when there are no leaves.

2) Never cut it with chainsaw. It'll spray the oil all over you. Cut with handsaw. Try not to transfer the oil all over you. When you're done, rub your handsaw blade in the dirt a few times. It'll soak up the oil.

3) Dirt is your friend, it's free, and it's on every job you do. If you get PI (urushiol) on you. Rub dirt on your arms. Rinse it off, and repeat.

4) The handsaw works great on the branchlets coming off the vine. Use the handsaw like a hatchet and swat them off to clear your path.

I've had steroid shots from PI before. It sucks. But I honestly feel like I got the stuff beat with this process.

One other thing, if you have to haul off the PI, I would avoid chipping it.
 

oceans

Well-Known Member
#7
Great sounding advice there, Logic. I only wonder of that would still work for people with real serious reactivity to the oil. It would be great if everyone could use the method you posted.

I'm one of the lucky guys that doesn't react to Poison Ivy. That also makes me the goto guy when it's on a job site. I just get into it and don't bother to treat it as a poisonous vine, but I make certain to let my co-workers know it's there. Most everyone I work with can ID it, and know who to handle it based on their level of reactivity.

I'm often reminded of our immune systems, and that I've heard they shift a bit in 7 years...I'm hoping I don't find out the hard way that my immune system shifted INTO the group of people that can't get near it.
 

TreeLogic

Well-Known Member
#8
Thanks Oceans. FWIW, I consider myself highly allergic. I think the people who say, "I can get it just by walking by it." really have more of a problem with the ID part.

I know guys who can roll in the stuff and be fine. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't envious. They should still get the oil off of them though.

I've reinfected myself in the days following a job...no reaction the first day... from the steering wheel, truck console, my belt, etc. Point being, in my experience, even if you're not affected by it, you can still transfer the oil to others.

I'm no expert, but I figured out something that helped me alot. Hope it can help somebody else.
 

oceans

Well-Known Member
#9
[ QUOTE ]
...Point being, in my experience, even if you're not affected by it, you can still transfer the oil to others.

[/ QUOTE ]

That's the truth! I'll be thinking about that more in the future. I don't know of any incidents where anything has been transferred yet, but it sure could happen.

We carry a few bottles of this stuff in the trucks. It works great, and probably beats rubbing soil all over our entire fleet of vehicles and tools!
...just busting', man. :)

http://www.timberwolfhandcleaner.com
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
#10
LOng sleeves, gloves and tape the cuffs if you're really sensitive. Wear a respirator and glasses if needed.. Be conscious not to scratch your eyes or face etc... toss the gloves and shirt ASAP... then wash down with liquid laundry soap and water ASAP...

On a systemic level, work on your adrenals and humble yourself and learn how to talk to plants, then go out and ask the warrior vine for peace..

Buddy of mine keeps giving it to his GF, even though he washes his clothes as soon as he comes home..
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
#11
As indicated above avoidance of Urushiol oil is king for me - all the way to using nitril gloves and a disposable Tyvek suit. Tecnu slathered on before hand to ‘seal pores’. When done rinse off with water then wash with Tecnu again for inexpensive shedding of more Urushiol oil.

Home as soon as possible and shower in cool water with Tecnu Extreme as an inexpensive way to ‘soak up’ left over Urushiol. Then if any irritation/itching develops use the more expensive product that I believe Tecnu Extreme tries to copy, Zanfel. Both products have tiny micro clusters that when wetted with water and rolled around the affected area absorb more Urushiol oil and are then rinsed off your skin a minute latter.

Zanfel’s info. sheet points out that livestock don’t get poison ____ because their skin is so thick. It then goes on to point out that if we get the Urushiol off our skin within x amount of time we won’t get it either. If you do get it and use Zanfel to absorb it off your skin, more oil works to the surface and you must reapply Zanfel in intervals until all is absorbed.

oceans, If you ever do get “reactive” to poison ____ (in seven years or whenever) you can reset to where you are now. The practice of N.A.E.T., Nambudribauds (sp) Allergy Elimination Technique works on reactivity developed to Urushiol and anything else that we become reactive to in life.

When I was a kid I would get Poison Oak bad very easily (not that much contact.) Then one time I was hospitalized etc.. My doctor told my mom that I may grow out of it at 12 or so. I remember thinking, why? That makes no sense, if it’s bad for me it is bad for me. Now I know the body does an energetic reshuffling around that time as we go through puberty. N.A.E.T. in my words is the study of how to bring about a positive ‘energetic reshuffling’ on anything we come into contact with and at any time. And it’s cheap and easy too.
 
#13
Very hot tap water as hot as you can tolerate for a few seconds on the itching rash gives a few hours of relief. Makes the histamines all get released at once and it takes a while for your body to build them back up. Zanfel is pretty good for the rash, it is expensive. There is a generic that some stores carry that is half the price.
 

TreeLogic

Well-Known Member
#14
Oils are hard to clean off of things. They're sticky. That's why you need something to absorb the oil that you can then rinse off. We get dirty as hell on a daily basis anyway so for me, fresh rich dirt does the trick. But baby powder would do the same thing. Calamine works the same way. But I like free and easy to find.

So, no offense, but when he y'all can't find your Technu, or you run out, give my plan a try. You can thank me later.

PS: The hot water is a bad idea IF you still have oil on you. It can open your pores and cause it to go systemic.

And bleach, sorry but I'm not putting that stuff on me. My goal is to keep you from getting an allergic reaction in the first place.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
#16
Dirt sounds like it has it’s place (funny how I blew past that in an earlier post) and I haven’t focused on cleaning up gear as much as I could. I guess after I got ‘cleared’ for reactivity to the oil I have gotten a bit more careless about it.

I have heard of hospitalizations with burning Poison Oak and with chipping it. People atomizing the oil and then breathing it in.

I have paid as much as $42 a tube for Zanfel, $34 at WalMart. A customer took my recommendation to try it and then was kind enough to make me aware that I could get it for $23 a tube on Amazon.
 
#17
[ QUOTE ]


PS: The hot water is a bad idea IF you still have oil on you. It can open your pores and cause it to go systemic.

[/ QUOTE ]

Cool water alone works best to remove the oil shortly after contact. Once the oil binds to the skin you need Zanfel or a similar product. Once the itch begins the very hot water for a second or two works really good to relieve the itch. I agree that the bleach is a waste of time. Works great for killing germs, not so much on poison ivy.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
#18
Bleach works really good on chiggers though! Put a quart in a tubfull of water and sit and soak for 15 min or so. Little buggers will be dead.
 

TreeLogic

Well-Known Member
#19
OldOak,
Chiggers suck about as bad as PI. My family used bleach to kill them too. Mom taught us to put some in the bath water and you could literally see them by the hundreds floating on the water. Bleach can be bad for you though. Sorry for sounding like such a know it all but rubbing alcohol does a great job at getting chiggers to let go. A lot easier on the body too. Just rub it on the potentially affected areas before they latch on good. FWIW.
 
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