Pecan Tree Pollination

Discussion in 'Pesticides and Ferts' started by Larry_Louks, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. Larry_Louks

    Larry_Louks New Member

    Hi Folks,

    We've just bought a four-year old home that we love. I can't imagine why the previous owner planted no trees here, but I have been busy remedying that. I've set out some oaks, magnolia, and citrus.

    It seems like I read somewhere that you do not have to have two (or more) pecan trees to get pecans. (That a single tree produces both male and female mechanisms that are sufficient for self-pollination.) Is this correct? My backyard is not very big, and where I have room for one pecan, two would be crowding things a bit. Thanks for any insight that you would like to offer.

    Larry
  2. rborist1

    rborist1 New Member

    Like alot of other fruiting trees, pecans require cross pollination in order to set fruit. Since you do not have the space for another pecan to mature, you can graft another variety of pecan to the tree. Hope this helps.
  3. theXman

    theXman Well-Known Member

    Craig,

    How did you know about pecans in Canada???

    I have three good size ones on my property here in Maryland, but it's very uncommon to find them here. I thought this was about as far North as they went.

    How come my pecan nuts aren't very big? I don't get very many either.

    Craig is right about needing more than one tree.
  4. rborist1

    rborist1 New Member

    I used to live in the heart of pecan country..........Texas! Pecans usually produce on alternate years and the further north you grow them the harder it is to get large nuts because of the length of the growing season.
  5. klimbinfool

    klimbinfool New Member

    could it not be the variety he has, That it isn't a large nut to begin with?

    Greg
  6. rborist1

    rborist1 New Member

    Sure it could be the variety........native pecans usually produce a smaller nut as opposed to other varities. If memory serves me correctly, pecan nuts takes well over 200 days of optimal growing to reach maturity though. I don't think that Maryland would have the kind of growing season required for the nuts to reach maturity.
  7. Larry_Louks

    Larry_Louks New Member

    Hi Craig,

    I appreciate the reply. I'll look into the possibility of grafting with the one tree.

    I've hunted again for the article that I read in which it stated that a single tree self-pollinates, but I haven't found it.

    Larry
  8. joe

    joe Member

    [ QUOTE ]
    Hi Craig,

    I appreciate the reply. I'll look into the possibility of grafting with the one tree.

    I've hunted again for the article that I read in which it stated that a single tree self-pollinates, but I haven't found it.

    Larry

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Both of you seem to be correct about the flowering and fruiting of Pecan trees.

    http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/volume_2/carya/illinoesis.htm

    The Silvics manual written by the U.S. Forest Service states native species are monacious and fruit by themselves. Cultivars of Pecans have an incomplete dichogamy which means the flowers on the same plant can mature at different times requiring another cultivar for pollination.

    Joe
  9. MARK_CHISHOLM

    MARK_CHISHOLM Administrator

    [ QUOTE ]
    I used to live in the heart of pecan country..........Texas!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Where in Texas? Were you born there or just live there for a spell?
  10. rborist1

    rborist1 New Member

    I was born in Canada. I lived in Brownwood TX for just over a year.

    I don't miss the summer TX heat and don't care for the cold Canadian winters........I guess I could move down half way and be content, after all I am married to a American.
  11. chad

    chad New Member

    are you in a micro climate where that tree will grow, or will its growth just be limited?

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