Opinions on Cuts

Z'sTrees

Well-Known Member
Snap cuts really shouldn't be used, IMO. You inevitably create a scenario where the crane is lifting more weight than the pick in order to break it off. Straight through where applicable, but the shelf cut and v cut are great tools for questionably balanced picks. Don't forget a traditional face and back cut can work well in some situations too. No matter what cut you make you want to be completely cutting the piece off, not letting the crane or gravity separate fibers.
 

Mitch Hoy

Member
I carry a wedge on a lanyard and make a straight back cut to the crane most of the time.
I make face cuts for pieces to boom up on.
I save the shelf for weird positions.
 

andrus kokerov

Well-Known Member
A shelf or V-cut almost always for me. Keeps the piece in place and time for the climber and crane to react. Also no extra lifting power needed. On stem parts i often cut just through, no problem when you guest the weight right. Iv used a facecut ones to boom a leader up, that i wasent sure i can balance out and it was realy close to the roof.
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
I make one plane cuts for nearly every pick. But with a certain order of saw direction so that when you get down to the minimum fibers, the movement wont pinch until the cut is 100% complete.
 

ghostice

Well-Known Member
"Snap cuts really shouldn't be used, IMO. You inevitably create a scenario where the crane is lifting more weight than the pick in order to break it off"
I wondered about this too, but suspended my scepticism when told that it's common for helicopter logging to make a cut from both sides horizontally in the same plane, but leave about 3/4" "hinge" more to one side of the trunk (i.e. not in the center). Usually heli logging will indicate to the machine the direction to pull the tree with tape near the ground - the pull being made in the direction of shorter distance to the "hinge wood". Been told that crane can do the same with boom movement rather than straight vertical cable up. Further thoughts? Still personally prefer a "V" cut usually.
 

allmark

Well-Known Member
Snap or by pass cuts are very effective cuts. The key is to not be too thick between the cuts or as previously stated the crane will need to apply to much pressure and cause a shock load. They are also very useful for new cutters with cranes until they gain more experience
 

*useless info*

Active Member
Snap or by pass cuts are very effective cuts. The key is to not be too thick between the cuts or as previously stated the crane will need to apply to much pressure and cause a shock load..
...And helps to have that small tension opposite side of pick,
so; can close face and stretch opposing tension to snap.
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Like, leave 3/4" tension strap(a la'ghostice )not in center;to give most leveraged distance(compression close crane side to tension fiber opposing side) for crane against tension hold .
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Tapered Hinge into upward open face great for working off balance horizontals into vertical pick with crane in good wood if operator agrees.
Then can have Dutched opposing side to force tearoff and also serve more towards crane in end game of sweep upward.
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Crane is how we show the last resort to drop something is up!
 
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Tony

Well-Known Member
Snap or by pass cuts are very effective cuts. The key is to not be too thick between the cuts or as previously stated the crane will need to apply to much pressure and cause a shock load.
Yup, what he said. I also like to line them up inline with the boom. Put the lower cut toward the crane, ball opposite. The the operator can boom up to separate. You can double kurf the lower cut as well, becomes a shallow face.

Tony
 

Fivepoints

Active Member
I will also add, if you're shock loading the crane with bypass cuts, your doing it wrong. The bad thing about doing it right is sometimes they won't end up holding as they will let go prematurely. We use this a lot while cutting from a bucket truck. We use the method that Tony described. Boom up a bit and it just comes off smooth.
 

*useless info*

Active Member
Would always treat crane like is gin-pole setup onsite temporary support from army manual fm 5-125.
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Crane is ownly as good as ground it stands on,
>>in usage pick straight up from overhead only, watch geometries, never impact.
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Geometry change can be high impacting force change at already high baseline load X length etc.
force is = leveraged static loading X speed SQUARED .
>>don't allow movement on boom against to keep speed squared and it's impact out of equation against thin gin pole.
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Let it serve it's function; but: Baby this puppy!
 
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