OLDS-Overhead Lowering...

monkeylove

Well-Known Member
I got mine last year from Carrol, love that thing. It's magical how well it works. How much are you charging for them Rescue, I know in one of the other threads they was some folks that might be looking for one.
 
I got mine last year from Carrol, love that thing. It's magical how well it works. How much are you charging for them Rescue, I know in one of the other threads they was some folks that might be looking for one.
Click on the Craigslist ad link in my post. I'm selling them at my cost just to get the rest of them in good hands.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
I've never worked with a POW in a tree, either natural crotch friction or a BS. Typical POW use at the base.

Its super useful to have the climber be able to stop sitting and watching the groundworker struggling to lower a piece while squeezing it into a tight landing zone. Its way more useful to have the groundie or climber catch the piece, and have the climber lower to the groundie. Does a lot to improve productivity.

The rope stays out of the way more, too.

You can easily adjust slack through the BS without having to reach it, with the rope through two slots at least. I don't recall ever using all the wraps, never having negative-blocked wood down, only with overhead rigging point. Its symmetrical, so you can land a piece on one end of the rope, let the ground crew get it untie/ stack the rope, while you work off the other end of the rope. Having a couple rope lengths to choose from helps, or simply tie a midline loop knot (bowline on a bight) and clip a biner there, or if chunking a spar, then use a clove hitch, with tie off.


It can bind against the trunk of the tree, so care must be taken. A POW would be similar.
 
Just an update: I've got way more people interested than I have belay spools, so I closed down the Craigslist ad.
I'm glad that some of you tree monkeys will put them to good use.
 

theXman

Well-Known Member
Anybody worn theirs out? I have grooves. Not complaining. Not working in the rain might help.

RescueMan, your CL post is absent.
SouthSound,
unfortunately, any friction device that uses the surface as friction is going to wear over time.

Dirty ropes, magnify the wear tremendously.

Mechanical ascenders, biners, lowering devices, X-Rigging Rings... you name it, no matter what the material, if the rope is dirty with mud, dry dirt or sand, you WILL wear your tools out.

That's a benefit of a block for sure. They don't wear out with grit.

I finally worked in pouring down rain on a job this year. On a muddy trail. Lowering decent sized pieces, all with rigging rings. Groundmen walking in 3 inches of water and ropes covered in mud from being stepped on and worked with.

When we were done, my double beast rings that were the terminal rigging point had two worn shiny aluminum patches. The redirect rings had no visible wear. Also, I wore out my spiderjack cam on my climbing rope as well.

When you have to work with dirty ropes, friction tools can wear.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Yes, David. As I mentioned, not complaining. I'm looking for a back-up to my original, which is a couple years old, and my main lowering device, despite having a med and large POW.

If you guys can get one, get one!
 

Treetopflyer

Well-Known Member
Yes, David. As I mentioned, not complaining. I'm looking for a back-up to my original, which is a couple years old, and my main lowering device, despite having a med and large POW.

If you guys can get one, get one!
I have one coming my way, very psyched about it . What kind of weight does one wrap control easily , have you ever used it in conjunction with seperate friction contoller on ground.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
You'll learn what you can lower. I found it would work for some big loads. If you're unsure you can to a partial trunk wrap while the piece is being cut.

Since there are two spring pins set in the drum to keep half inch line from crossing and jamming I have considered having a machinist drill one hole in the center so that I could use larger diameter rope. Of course this would null and void any warranty and responsibility.

On the other hand, half inch double braid is super strong, I wonder if I would really use this for anything larger.
 

Jeff_Cochran

Well-Known Member
i use a porty in the tree all the time when flying in the bucket. it is quick and dirty and works well in a smooth three man operation. one roper/cutman, one climber/bucket op, and one guy moving debris with the mini-skid
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
i use a porty in the tree all the time when flying in the bucket. it is quick and dirty and works well in a smooth three man operation. one roper/cutman, one climber/bucket op, and one guy moving debris with the mini-skid
When you can move up to the lowering device with a bucket to reset the rope, its easy. if you have to climb up and down for each piece, more work, especially the farther the LD is from the work.

Are you able to easily adjust the slack back through the POW remotely?
 
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