New throw hook on the market

colb

Well-Known Member
#2
Is it Paul Poynter on IG @woodenhand that has one and posts about it? He likes it. I can see how useful it could be. Can also imagine that it could get caught in small branches...
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
#7
Way cool but super expensive. I might be interested at $200-$250. Looks like it hooks the rope not the branch like the DMM Captain...

What's the eye for at the end?
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
#10
OK, that video above, of using the Bennet Hook, got me excited so some more tinkering in the shop late at night to home brew a version (do not really have the $360. to spare and had a chunk of No.60 stainless roller chain). Slightly different in config from the real item but it seems to handle about the same. The roller chain will always fall over either way around the limb, to line up the hook and also when it is time to pull it off the limb. I played around with it about half an hour and in that time was able to more or less get the knack of quickly grabbing the hanging hook with a horizontal fling of the line. Same thing to unhook afterwards. The neat thing about it, compared to the Captain, is that the Bennet will not slide sideways on an angled or down slanted limb. There is a place for both in my pile; I love using my Captain Hook too. My home brew Bennet is rather heavy just hanging on the saddle, but once you are throwing it the weight is a decided advantage. Raining this week but will try to get some GoPro footage of using it once the weather clears.
DIYBennet.png
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
#12
Thanks, Santiago. It is fun making stuff like that! Not sure how much use I will actually get with it since I like my Captain Hook for most purposes and it lives permanently on the other end of my long lanyard. But this gadget might have a place in a tree like these cedars I have here with limbs sloping sharply downwards. The hook tends to slip down badly on limbs in trees like that.
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
#14
I wondered about that too.. But, one thing I have noticed right away with this thing, which I think is a serious limitation, is that the convenient length of it has a lot to do with the actual diameter of the limb you are targeting. On a smallish limb, the extra length is a real hindrance because the chain links are running completely around the limb and through the hook part. This can make it hard to disentangle later. But on a large limb, you might want even more length so it hangs down far enough to snag the hook when you fling the line to set the hook And it is a pain to add or remove links. Definitely not something you can do on the spot. Now, I am not sure there would be the same problem with a genuine Bennet Hook; it might work a lot better than my DIY version.
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
#15
OK, that video above, of using the Bennet Hook, got me excited so some more tinkering in the shop late at night to home brew a version (do not really have the $360. to spare and had a chunk of No.60 stainless roller chain). Slightly different in config from the real item but it seems to handle about the same. The roller chain will always fall over either way around the limb, to line up the hook and also when it is time to pull it off the limb. I played around with it about half an hour and in that time was able to more or less get the knack of quickly grabbing the hanging hook with a horizontal fling of the line. Same thing to unhook afterwards. The neat thing about it, compared to the Captain, is that the Bennet will not slide sideways on an angled or down slanted limb. There is a place for both in my pile; I love using my Captain Hook too. My home brew Bennet is rather heavy just hanging on the saddle, but once you are throwing it the weight is a decided advantage. Raining this week but will try to get some GoPro footage of using it once the weather clears.
View attachment 54285
A work of art @Burrapeg! Can you tell us more about the end (anchor that hooks the rope) portion of your build? Home welded SS or repurposed from something else?
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
#16
A work of art @Burrapeg! Can you tell us more about the end (anchor that hooks the rope) portion of your build? Home welded SS or repurposed from something else?
Thanks for the kind words! The hook end is just a piece of steel key stock. I drilled a hole at each end; and on the hook end threaded a bent steel rod thru it, then welded it. I smoothed it up a bit everywhere with an angle grinder and emery flap wheel.
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
#18
Four hooks, like a grapnel? Might be hard to get it back off the limb. The thing the chain does, besides give weight, is to make the device curve over the limb with the two hooks sideways to the limb, so it will slide back over without catching when you are ready to retrieve it. I have been playing with the thing some more and, all in all, I am finding it rather tricky to use if the target limb is any distance below my own position. Very hard to snag it like that. And it also gets to be difficult if too far above as well. It would be neat to try a genuine Bennet Hook to compare.
 

Burrapeg

Well-Known Member
#20
I wonder if you could get away with fewer links to lighten it, and still get the advantage of them lining up the hooks for snagging?
I have been thinking about your suggestion and may try that tomorrow since the rain has quit for a few days. Maybe pull out about four links and see how it goes.
 
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