New guy crane questions

TimberJack

Well-Known Member
All noted, and appreciated @tc262. I'm in Florida, where tree work standards are often a little iffy. Even though this crane operator comes with a great reference, I'm still wondering how much swinging he's accustomed to and how many slings he uses to pick. Using his main line and having some extra lines seems like a great idea to run by him.
Im pretty sure osha and ansi are national standards maybe you should look into them...
 

colb

Well-Known Member
I linked a video, let me know if you can't see it.
I can view the video, but it's different on a portawrap than on a limb, right? I'm not able to connect the two - perhaps I don't have enough knot experience.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Im pretty sure osha and ansi are national standards maybe you should look into them...
Thanks Timberjack. I'm getting ready to sit down with the ANSI, which I understand is the important one in this case. Also thinking about whether to order the TCIA manual. I'm not excited about the TCIA these days...
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
The book isn't worth what they charge but there is some helpful information in it. OSHA and ANSI will tell you what not to do but not how to do it. Do you have another climber you can work on this job? Going into your first crane job blind sucks. I've been there.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Consider buying a crane operator Sena headset.


How much of the road do you need, and can you get by with using?


Are you going to need a Traffic Control Plan for the city? You should put some cones/ signage out, as needed. MUTCD https://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/kno-overview.htm
This is perhaps what I'm most concerned about. This intersection feels like it is a dangerous place to carry out tree operations. I'll have a dependable guy managing that, but it's still not the best time for me to learn new tricks. Optimistically, the crane may decrease our traffic stop time if it can get the wood across to the road opposite the driveway.
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the guidance guys, and I agree.

Does anyone know a proper crane removal, primarily-SRT climber vaguely near North Florida who might consult/train me?
I was just there in Florida last week, I would of helped you for sure ! Steve's the closest I vote for him!
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
This is perhaps what I'm most concerned about. This intersection feels like it is a dangerous place to carry out tree operations. I'll have a dependable guy managing that, but it's still not the best time for me to learn new tricks. Optimistically, the crane may decrease our traffic stop time if it can get the wood across to the road opposite the driveway.

Probably only Certified Flaggers and Police can legally direct traffic, fwiw. Are you going to be drawing attention from local law enforcement (are you a block from City Hall or the local PD)?
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Probably only Certified Flaggers and Police can legally direct traffic, fwiw. Are you going to be drawing attention from local law enforcement (are you a block from City Hall or the local PD)?
It's immediately off a small main thoroughfare. People turning in to the neighborhood will be surprised unless they are forewarned out on the main road. I will obviously need to block entry from the main road (and the other two roads) while each piece goes across the neighborhood road to the third road, which fronts the main road to serve 5 houses and is opposite the customer's driveway. That is where I want my pile - nice and quiet spot. The point being, possibly, so yes-ish.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
If you're jumping in the deep end with both feet and space is an issue, maybe it makes sense to simplify it, if you can rig out some/ all of the brush (possibly rig piles to go over the house by crane??) leaving you less problematic drop zone set-downs in the driveway, rather than flying over the street.


Maybe you can simply fly stuff over, if you have good traffic control.
 

tc262

Well-Known Member
I can view the video, but it's different on a portawrap than on a limb, right? I'm not able to connect the two - perhaps I don't have enough knot experience.
Just imagine it like where the port a wrap is, is the crane ball. Picture it with the port a wrap farther away with the leg of rope running down. It's the same knot just gotta look at it slightly different.
And I used a clove until @Tyler Durden showed me to use the cow hitch. Maybe he can explain it in simple terms.
 

TJG

Active Member
Let us know how you make out with this job I have never done any crane work either. Just watched videos!! Godd Luck My the Arborist Force be with you!!
Ted
 

Tyler Durden

Well-Known Member
When I tie on my crane loads, using the cow hitch, I picture a tentionless anchor. The beauty of the cow hitch is that there is no binding of the hitches if you tie it properly. It is as secure as can be, but if you watch the direction of loading, the hitch comes out with very little effort on the ground man's part.
A bag of slings on the hook makes life simple as well.


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colb

Well-Known Member
Let us know how you make out with this job I have never done any crane work either. Just watched videos!! Godd Luck My the Arborist Force be with you!!
Ted
Yeah Ted, I'm locating a trainer and asking the city about the traffic issue. Lots of hurry up and wait...
 

colb

Well-Known Member
When I tie on my crane loads, using the cow hitch, I picture a tentionless anchor. The beauty of the cow hitch is that there is no binding of the hitches if you tie it properly. It is as secure as can be, but if you watch the direction of loading, the hitch comes out with very little effort on the ground man's part.
A bag of slings on the hook makes life simple as well.


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That picture goes along with everything everyone is saying. Is your friction saver on a shackle? Looks like it is just girth hitched straight to the cable above the ball, but I'm guessing the shackle is there, out of view.
 

Tyler Durden

Well-Known Member
It is just girthed around the cable, above its termination clamp. That was @tc262 's treestuff tie in point. It is the safest and simplest way to get it done. And as a primarlary SRT climber, I still do DdRT off the ball, still can't figure a good SRT method on a crane with out leaving a climbing line attached all day.

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