New Fall Arrest training requirement for Ontario?

Discussion in 'Rules and Regs' started by Anonymity, Mar 12, 2016.

  1. squad143

    squad143 Well-Known Member

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    If I'm doing tree work on a construction site, possibly. I'll have to check into that.
    Just because I'm in a tree, say homeowners backyard. I believe no.
    Right now these rules are mandatory for the "construction" industry.
    WSIB is mandatory for the construction industry. It is not mandatory for us, it's "By Application", not mandatory.
    I'm not advocating not having training or comp. just stating how different we are from "construction" in the governments eyes.
    OHS rules govern us as do some sections of Construction, Forestry and Industrial.
    I believe that the industry specific training that I have for doing the work that I do is sufficient for the work that I do.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016
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  2. squad143

    squad143 Well-Known Member

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    How about we all talk about something a little less controversial......
    Like riding the crane ball :whistle:
     
  3. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    3. Subject to subsection 116 (8), the top of the guardrail system shall be located at least 0.9 metres but not more than 1.1 metres above the surface on which the system is installed.
     
  4. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    26.7 (1) A permanent anchor system shall be used as the fixed support in a fall arrest system, fall restricting system or travel restraint system if the following conditions are met:

    1. The anchor system has been installed according to the Building Code.

    2. It is safe and practical to use the anchor system as the fixed support. O. Reg. 145/00, s. 14.
    (3) Despite the requirements listed in subsection (2), the support capacity of a temporary fixed support used in a fall protection system may be determined by dynamic testing in accordance with good engineering practice to ensure that the temporary fixed support has adequate capacity to arrest a worker’s fall. O. Reg. 145/00, s. 14.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2016
  5. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    4. The system shall be installed or erected, and maintained, in accordance with the professional engineer’s design.

    5. Before each use, the system shall be inspected by a professional engineer or a competent worker designated by a supervisor.
     
  6. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    Have already posted the ontario regs on this many times as well as having on the job approval from the MOL while using Norm Hall's tie in technique.
     
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  7. squad143

    squad143 Well-Known Member

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    I was just being cheeky. Seems there are lots of threads on that subject and they are always interesting.
    May have missed your stating the Ont. Regs. I'll have to do some hunting.(y)
     
  8. Anonymity

    Anonymity Member

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    Thanks to everyone for your post's! This thread even proves my point a little more...all this can be so confusing, even for someone who's trying to do the right things! I'm starting to just have the personal policy to work safely and show do diligence toward training and standards...and just sadly except the fact that at times I'm probably braking some "rule" somewhere that I have know clue about ... I wish it was more like traffic laws. I know the rules and if I follow them I'm ok, no tickets but if I don't I could be in trouble.
     
  9. mrtree

    mrtree Well-Known Member

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    I just read the entire section of working at heights stuff (it is S 26), not a big read and it is pretty damn clear; if you work at heights you must be protected from falling to a surface below. How you do that is a choice, with guardrails being only one option.

    Anonymity why don't you take the training I found and you will then have a clue and no excuse. I imagine a day of your time is well worth the knowledge and compliance you will gain.
     
  10. Anonymity

    Anonymity Member

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    Who said I don't have fall arrest training? I do have fall arrest training...(sounds like a point was missed). I was just wondering if I needed a particular government flavour of fall arrest training, with a particular piece of paper? Again, after speaking with some other tree companies they seemed to indicate to me that if I didn't have "that particular" training I could be fined.
     
  11. Mangoes

    Mangoes Well-Known Member

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    Preceding the 2009 Christmas Eve Swing-stage collapse:
    - employers were (are) required to provide training specific to the hazards of the job
    - workers who worked at height were required to have training specific to the hazards of working at height (hazards, systems, policies, procedures)

    The Christmas Eve tragedy (and a spate of occupational falls) was the catalyst for creating a "Standardized WAH Training Curriculum".
    - all Construction sector workers must have the training by the aforementioned due date (currently within a grace period)
    - the Training Standard is generic and possesses nearly zero Arboriculture discussion
    - however it trains in general WAH policies, procedures and regulations
    - the Training Standard does not replace or overwright job/industry specific training which is STILL required

    Eventually all employers/industries in ON will be required to:
    a) provide the Standardized WAH Training module
    b) provide job specific WAH training that is specific to the hazards, systems, policies, procedures of the job/industry (i.e. Arboriculture)

    IHSA has two instructors who are Arborists and are able to deliver the Curriculum Standard yet make it somewhat relevant to the Arborist. We did 11 staff just a few weeks ago.

    Note - this training does evaluate competency. It is possible to fail the test or practical evaluation.
     
  12. Anonymity

    Anonymity Member

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    Ok thanks Mangoes, that sounds much more like what these other tree guys were talking about...thanks for posting
     
  13. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    Why don't you and every one of your employees just take TDG training to carry gas cans in your trucks, why don't you and every one of your employees take an A/Z trucking course since they drive chip trucks, why don't you and all of your employees take an industrial forklift courses to run your mini skids?

    Because while there are industries that require certificated training for these skills and we use skills that are similar they simply do not apply to us and an employers training budget would be much better spent on skills that do.
     
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  14. Anonymity

    Anonymity Member

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    Yes, I agree.
     
  15. Mangoes

    Mangoes Well-Known Member

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    James - haves you had a chance to argue with Mike (Mrtree) in person? Smart guy, knows his $h!t, but LOVES an argument!

    (Mrtree - right bud?!?)
     
  16. mrtree

    mrtree Well-Known Member

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    I really have no idea what you are talking about.

    As for training, absolutely do as you want your the owner. Legislation is only created as there has been a problem in the wider working world. If you think you can do better, than do better. The concept is simple, your policy and procedures (SOPs) must meet or exceed the directing legislation.

    As for gas cans, again do as you want. Legislation may require you to handle gas in a specific manner but we know arborists do not have accidents so ignore the legislation.
     
  17. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if I have met him or not, but I too love a good debate, I'm not trying to hurt any feelings, just enjoy this kinda stuff.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016
  18. Pelorus

    Pelorus Well-Known Member

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    Recently took the working at heights, and elevated work platform courses through CRS (Contractors Rental Supply) - which has multiple locations across Ontario.
    Would not classify having done do as either a waste of time, (especially during winter downtime), nor money. And if CEU's can be gained, there will be additional satisfaction. Learned a couple of things, and it was interesting.
    CRS has a policy that they will not rent out an aerial platform to someone who does not have this training, which was my primary motivation for going. Other equipment rental supply outfits may have different policies, but I reckon if you are working at heights on what can be considered a construction site, you gotta have the training. Which is good for a three year period.
     
  19. classictruckman

    classictruckman Well-Known Member

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    Do you mind sharing the cost of the training from the rental shop?
     
  20. Pelorus

    Pelorus Well-Known Member

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    The working at heights was $160 or $180, and consumed most of the day. written test was a no brainer. The practical was quite thorough, and consisted mostly of seeing whether each individual could properly inspect, put on, & adjust a full body harness and lanyard, etc. The other course was $120, iirc, and was only half a day, but there were only 4 of us taking that one. Donuts and coffee included. :)
     

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