New Choking Crane Sling Stays on Hook

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
The guys that have used them all seem to like it. Lots of other options if this isn't your thing.

Nothing new ever came about because people didn't try new stuff.


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Isn't some or all SRT banned in Germany....and your introducing this technique? I would think this is far more risky than anything SRT related? Funny how the world turns.
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure those events are connected


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My point is....You can't climb on SRT in Germany...but you can sling large pieces of wood over someone house and your crew with a new devise that could potentially fail? Who are these guys you gave this to try out? Are they using this in a work environment? I know I was just audited by my insurance company and they asked to see my slings, and asked for the log we use to keep track of our slings. I am not sure this would fly IMO with them.
 

bonner1040

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure I agree with the statement "could potentially fail" we've proof and field tested these extensively with nothing but positive results.

Crews at Heartwood, TreeCare Inc and others are using these regularly with positive feedback.

Luckily if you prefer a different setup there are tons of options available that aren't going anywhere and no mandate that you have to use this system.


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96coal449

Well-Known Member
Nick, this would have to meet Osha standards ...... wouldn't it? Crane work in NYC has the tightest regulations in the nation, setting standards high in the NE. I don't see this sling ever getting certified for crane use. I like the soft sling concept though. I had a chain sling glance my elbow once pruning limbs. I was tied in and the sling was under load. Cut it loose and it swung by me a little bit after the tips freed from an adjacent limb. Hollow braid's softer than even straps but I don't see your knot thingy passing specs.
 

96coal449

Well-Known Member
Slings are labeled for their weight ratings ...... right? And then they get a date of manufacture. This is going to be checked by osha if there's a failure. Someone's going to declare an un-closed sling system unsafe.
 

SJ_Treeguy

Active Member
Hey Nick it is good to defend you product ! Everything needs to be tested and approved, it sounds to me that no one is slamming your crane sling they are just giving you sound advice! Just because two tree companies have these and like them does not mean they are ready for the marketplace, were is the break test data, the wear factor data and I could go on ! This needs test after test before it is released , your original question was what do we think of this ? But you are acting like it's already in production, be patient!
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
What are you referring to? The slings?
I think he is referring to the fact that if a crane operator showed up to your job, and you wanted to use those slings....what would the operator say?
My insurance is written that I have full responsibility of whatever happens when I am on site with my crane. Meaning, my insurance company is held liable for anything that happens. So, if that pieces falls off the hook because the sling broke, its my fault. If the piece falls off because the rigger didn't hook it right, that is my fault as well.
 

dbl612

Active Member
Nick, this would have to meet Osha standards ...... wouldn't it? Crane work in NYC has the tightest regulations in the nation, setting standards high in the NE. I don't see this sling ever getting certified for crane use. I like the soft sling concept though. I had a chain sling glance my elbow once pruning limbs. I was tied in and the sling was under load. Cut it loose and it swung by me a little bit after the tips freed from an adjacent limb. Hollow braid's softer than even straps but I don't see your knot thingy passing specs.
would never be allowed on a new york job site and would be highly questioned by an osha inspector if involved in an accident regarding a dropped load, as there is no positive connection. a giant no. just because heartwood likes it, does not mean its accepted as an industry standard by any stretch of the imagination.
 

dbl612

Active Member
Hey Nick it is good to defend you product ! Everything needs to be tested and approved, it sounds to me that no one is slamming your crane sling they are just giving you sound advice! Just because two tree companies have these and like them does not mean they are ready for the marketplace, were is the break test data, the wear factor data and I could go on ! This needs test after test before it is released , your original question was what do we think of this ? But you are acting like it's already in production, be patient!
it would be interesting wmherenicks liability falls in this issue, seeing as the systems safe usage depends on the users proper dressing of the sling when applied.
 

dbl612

Active Member
I think he is referring to the fact that if a crane operator showed up to your job, and you wanted to use those slings....what would the operator say?
My insurance is written that I have full responsibility of whatever happens when I am on site with my crane. Meaning, my insurance company is held liable for anything that happens. So, if that pieces falls off the hook because the sling broke, its my fault. If the piece falls off because the rigger didn't hook it right, that is my fault as well.
you are partially correct there, royce. if the piece falls off because it was not rigged right, and the rigger isn't employed by your company, the your insurance company will contest their responsibility.
 

96coal449

Well-Known Member
I think he is referring to the fact that if a crane operator showed up to your job, and you wanted to use those slings....what would the operator say?
My insurance is written that I have full responsibility of whatever happens when I am on site with my crane. Meaning, my insurance company is held liable for anything that happens. So, if that pieces falls off the hook because the sling broke, its my fault. If the piece falls off because the rigger didn't hook it right, that is my fault as well.
And an even larger liability if said piece kills someone. I remember the old timers words that made his own slings from 5/8 and 3/4 3-strand. "Don't get under it!"
 

craneguy1

Well-Known Member
you are partially correct there, royce. if the piece falls off because it was not rigged right, and the rigger isn't employed by your company, the your insurance company will contest their responsibility.
So then if you rent a crane and someone else besides one of their employees does the rigging and it falls/falls apart, the crane company is (no pun intended) off the hook? What if you are just a small tree guy who rents a crane for a job and assumes the crane company is responsible and you have not a lick of general liability that remotely covers using a crane? Just thinking out loud....food for thought ya'll. You rig it you own it; get insurance.
 

dbl612

Active Member
So then if you rent a crane and someone else besides one of their employees does the rigging and it falls/falls apart, the crane company is (no pun intended) off the hook? What if you are just a small tree guy who rents a crane for a job and assumes the crane company is responsible and you have not a lick of general liability that remotely covers using a crane? Just thinking out loud....food for thought ya'll. You rig it you own it; get insurance.
the crane rental company is responsible for everything they supply. if they provide licensed riggers for the job, they are responsible for the actions of said riggers. if the tree guy hooks on to the tree incorrectly (on an area that will not support the load imparted on it) and the piece breaks and falls causing damage and or injury, the tree guy is responsible for that accident, not the crane company. if the tree guy provides his own slings, he is also responsible for the integrity and application of those slings. think about this when you don't want to use the crane companies slings and/or pay fees for the use of their rigging.
 

dbl612

Active Member
the crane rental company is responsible for everything they supply. if they provide licensed riggers for the job, they are responsible for the actions of said riggers. if the tree guy hooks on to the tree incorrectly (on an area that will not support the load imparted on it) and the piece breaks and falls causing damage and or injury, the tree guy is responsible for that accident, not the crane company. if the tree guy provides his own slings, he is also responsible for the integrity and application of those slings. think about this when you don't want to use the crane companies slings and/or pay fees for the use of their rigging.
also think about this when you decide to use an uncertified product such as this new adjustable sling with no positive connection point. if you wouldn't use this type of connection for your lifeline, why would you use it to hoist a load overhead? the consequences of failure are both deadly.
 

TimberJack

Well-Known Member
I miss the gumbo hooks that are so poplur amoungst the many. Rental crane co's seem to love their shackles though. Maybe what you need to work on is a giant quicky.
 

craneguy1

Well-Known Member
Nick just send me one and ill document every lift i do with it...in non-critical situations of course...include chafe sleeve...we'll test longevity of such braid.
 
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