My knuckleboom hooklift mecanil sg160 build

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
On your footprint truck diagram (on your website) it says your Gvwr is 50,990. That is why I was confused, cause if you are 20/46 wouldn't your. Gvwr be 66,000?
Yes but I put what palfingers drawings said for the truck. They gave me a curb weight and a max weight. It doesn't add up to the springs though. My curb weight is 54k and my max is about 59k. The web site was done before I actually put the truck on the scales.
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
No my scale weight is rite on. Steer has about 12000 and rears have about 42000 with the pusher at 30psi. Takes about 3k off the steer.
 

Lumberjack

Well-Known Member
Also, he needed the weight of the hoist anyways.

My rear mount truck has ~4400lb of weight added between the front headboard and front bumper.
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
I have 360 degrees of full chart compacity even without the container in the truck.

This is another advantage to a cab mount, usually less weight has to be added.
 

TimberJack

Well-Known Member
So the added weight is ballast when the wheels are off the ground... do they ever add weight to truck mounted stick booms?
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
So the added weight is ballast when the wheels are off the ground... do they ever add weight to truck mounted stick booms?
Knucklebooms you never want the tires off the ground, it is part of the stability. You just lower your outriggers to just slightly extend your suspension.

I'd assume so, yes (add weight to stick boom trucks). You need counter weight to lift weight.
 

jwelchert

New Member
What's your budget look like for this build with the addition of the hooklift if you don't mind sharing? Just looking to see how all the lines add up (truck, crane, fab, grapple saw, etc) Considering a build myself, looking at different options for a build for the flexibility just as you had brought up in your post.
 

chipper1

Member
Knucklebooms you never want the tires off the ground, it is part of the stability. You just lower your outriggers to just slightly extend your suspension.
That's interesting, never been taught that. If an outrigger starts to sink you would transfer the weight to the tire/tires. I've been in a situation or two where that happened running other types of cranes and it speeds everything up very fast, which can be a bit hairy when the safeties start shutting functions down.
To be clear I'm not doubting, but curious as that was not what I was taught will the booms/cranes I've ran.
Very nice setup, as you said you can run the crane for many yrs to come. What's you estimated ROI.
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
With knuckles and cables you never want the outriggers to sink! That is super dangerous! You can topple a crane pretty easy doing that. If you pad out and lift the crane off the ground and see no sinkage that’s a great start. If you want the tires on the ground that’s fine after a pressure test!
 

chipper1

Member
That's the point, once it happens it happens quick, I wouldn't leave it set up in a spot I knew it was going to sink!
I've set up on many construction sites where all is well until it isn't(ground is not settled because of grading top is frozen, and whatnot), and when they go they go fast.
 
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