My knuckleboom hooklift mecanil sg160 build

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
Look forward to the build. It's going to be awesome. Why did you choose the Fassi over the Palfinger or Effer? I am looking at buying or building one as well and wonder which one to choose.
The main reason I chose Fassi is because that is what a local crane shop deals with...15-20 minutes away. So it makes it easy for service etc. Plus I feel some of the electronics are better on fassi. This is only the 3rd fassi crane, with a grapple saw, that I know about in North America. The first one that this shop is doing. So I expect some complication, but I have faith my local shop will figure them out.

Palfinger definitely has more knowledge of tree mek builds, and seem to have higher load charts.

Ps the local shop used to deal in palfinger cranes but switched to fassi.
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
They are pretty sure I don't need a pusher, legally. Of course it will hurt my log carrying capacity some though. I had told them I didn't want it, unless it was needed, but we do have frame room for it if I decide to add one later, {or the law makes me}

According to their computer program the from axle will have 18,900 lbs on it out of 20,000. The tandems will have 29,100 on them.
 

Lumberjack

Well-Known Member
A 19klb axle sucks on driveways. I would want a pusher for that.

My Mec was supposed to be 43klb, ended up being 51klb, 19klb on the steer, 31klb on the drives, next to no legal payload. The first picture is how the truck was supposed weigh according to the information Jason sent me to buy the truck. The second is the first weight “bump” after I bought it, the scale ticket they showed me, with the log bunks, man basket, and whatever else on the deck in their office. The third is what it scaled at home with the extras removed (only the grapple saw, no rigging aside from the hooks for the booms shown in the forth picture). Tiffin still hasn’t made it right. Long story short, maxed out front axles suck, super heavy axles suck. I had a steer tire punch through the edge of the county asphalt street while working.

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climbhightree

Well-Known Member
A 19klb axle sucks on driveways. I would want a pusher for that.

My Mec was supposed to be 43klb, ended up being 51klb, Tiffin still hasn’t made that right. 19klb on the steer, 32klb on the drives, next to no legal payload.
Yeah I hear you, and already figured I'd add it at some point. I know it would give me better payload and weight distribution. I was mostly trying to keep the cost down, and the truck short (but later decided I better keep the frame long enough incase I need/want it).

Once the crane is mounted, and we can get a better idea of the weight, I will for sure bring this topic back up to them. I already re-mentioned that I need the room for it, in case it is needed. The shop guys affirmed it wouldn't be too hard to add it to the truck later.
 

Lumberjack

Well-Known Member
Yeah I hear you, and already figured I'd add it at some point. I know it would give me better payload and weight distribution. I was mostly trying to keep the cost down, and the truck short (but later decided I better keep the frame long enough incase I need/want it).

Once the crane is mounted, and we can get a better idea of the weight, I will for sure bring this topic back up to them. I already re-mentioned that I need the room for it, in case it is needed. The shop guys affirmed it wouldn't be too hard to add it to the truck later.

Good deal. It’s much easier to plan while building than after everything is mounted and filled.
 
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Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
Wow! one of those trucks here would be awesome! My only concern is the steep terrain here? smallish crappy dirt driveways and bad access. It would be a bad idea to invest in something that only gets used half the time. But maybe it means not taking the other lobs? Just focus on crane jobs? Never done it so ...
 

Stephen Moore

Well-Known Member
The mechanil looks wicked sweet though... nobody in the entire area owns one. The closest thing to that would be a feller buncher.
 

Baja Mike

Active Member
So what is the optimal truck axle configuration that will be legal and still have log capacity and light on driveways. I am ignorant on this subject matter. Looking at building a 40 or 50 metric ton unit. What is the best truck to start with. Sorry for the detail @climbhightree would you like me to start a new thread?
Thanks for the help
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
So what is the optimal truck axle configuration that will be legal and still have log capacity and light on driveways. I am ignorant on this subject matter. Looking at building a 40 or 50 metric ton unit. What is the best truck to start with. Sorry for the detail @climbhightree would you like me to start a new thread?
Thanks for the help
For now it is OK, it is an interesting topic. More axles definitely better for legality and weight capacity. I think the first question one needs to answer is rear mount vs cab mount on the crane...that plays a lot in the weight distribution of the truck.

I'm new to all this...i let the crane company decide on the truck brand and configuration (other than cab mount, hooklift, front outrigger, and short
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
Maybe my need for the pusher is because i'm rear mount?
I think it plays a part in it. It puts the weight of the crane completely on the rear tandems, instead of being somewhat shared between the two. My crane weighs 14,400 lbs by itself. My 3 axles come out to 66,000 (20 front, 46 rears) , where as your site listed your Gvwr at 50,990.

I forget is your front axle rated for? And your tandems?
 
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climbhightree

Well-Known Member
A 19klb axle sucks on driveways. I would want a pusher for that.

My Mec was supposed to be 43klb, ended up being 51klb, 19klb on the steer, 31klb on the drives, next to no legal payload. The first picture is how the truck was supposed weigh according to the information Jason sent me to buy the truck. The second is the first weight “bump” after I bought it, the scale ticket they showed me, with the log bunks, man basket, and whatever else on the deck in their office. The third is what it scaled at home with the extras removed (only the grapple saw, no rigging aside from the hooks for the booms shown in the forth picture). Tiffin still hasn’t made it right. Long story short, maxed out front axles suck, super heavy axles suck. I had a steer tire punch through the edge of the county asphalt street while working.

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Wow
 

Steve Connally

Well-Known Member
I think it plays a part in it. It puts the weight of the crane completely on the rear tandems, instead of being somewhat shared between the two. My crane weighs 14,400 lbs by itself. My 3 axles come out to 66,000 (20 front, 46 rears) , where as your site listed your Gvwr at 50,990.

I forget is your front axle rated for? And your tandems?
20k fronts and 46 rears
 

Evan_WI

Member
You'll want to look up "bridge law." I think it is a federal law that rear tandems are limited to 34,000lbs. So, even though the equipment is rated to 46k you can only legally put 34k on them. I would definitely add another axle to that truck!

On another note, I'm surprised that the torque box doesn't extend all the way down the frame to the rear outriggers. Is this typical on cab-mount cranes of this size?
 

climbhightree

Well-Known Member
You'll want to look up "bridge law." I think it is a federal law that rear tandems are limited to 34,000lbs. So, even though the equipment is rated to 46k you can only legally put 34k on them. I would definitely add another axle to that truck!

On another note, I'm surprised that the torque box doesn't extend all the way down the frame to the rear outriggers. Is this typical on cab-mount cranes of this size?
According to their schematics the rears will only have 29,000 something on them (when empty).

Yes there will be shear plates put on yet the connect the torque box and hooklift to the frame, from the cab to the rear outriggers. Should be on by the time I go back down for more pictures.
 

Evan_WI

Member
So if you're at 19k on the front and 29k in the back you're good for ~5-6k in payload. I'm thinking you're going to want to carry about 3 times that. Also, I'd agree with what others have said about the front axle being that heavy. You're likely to break sidewalks, or driveways with that.
 
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